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Despite Bernie Sanders’ string of primary losses to Hillary Clinton earlier this week, he’s vowing to continue his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination.

With Clinton’s big advantage in delegates, the nomination might be a long shot for Sanders. But he’s still raising money and rallying for his case that the Democratic Party needs to embrace a set of progressive policies.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

The federal Securities and Exchange Commission sent another subpoena to the city of Hartford in January, a sign that its investigation into the city and its treasurer is continuing. 

Twitter @GoYardGoats

Hartford officials are again asking legislators to pass a state law to help to pay for its new baseball stadium.

The shutdown of Washington, D.C.'s Metrorail system for an entire day — 29 hours to be exact — for a safety inspection prompted a New York Times interviewee to say: "It's the capital of the United States and one of the biggest business centers in the country. This is like a developing country."

As a Youngstown native, I have come to expect this.

Every presidential election year, candidates flock to Youngstown, Ohio, to use my hometown as a political backdrop.

It's a great place to talk about job losses. Steel mills used to line the Mahoning River for miles, churning out tens of thousands of jobs. Those jobs drove the city's population from 33,000 in 1890 to 170,000 in 1930. My grandparents came from Poland and Hungary to join in that boom.

In the mid-20th century, Youngstown became known for its union jobs and high levels of home ownership.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford resident Tenaya Taylor, 25, became a bike commuter last summer. She’s a college student and works a few different jobs around the city. The bus schedule can be unreliable sometimes, she said, so biking for her is the fastest way to get around. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

When Luke Bronin was running to be Hartford’s mayor, he said he wanted to spend some time looking under the hood at the city’s finances. He’s done that now, and what he's seen isn't good. In advance of his state of the city address tonight, Bronin sat down with WNPR to share his take on the city's budget. 

Michael Blann/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

MGM International wants to give Connecticut a little advice about siting its proposed new casino. The gaming group has released a study which says if Connecticut put a third casino somewhere in Fairfield County, it would generate more revenue and more jobs. 

The cities of Springfield, Holyoke, and Northampton along with Amherst and UMass have signed an agreement committing to move forward on a regional bike share program. 

The program, tentatively named “ValleyBike,” would make bicycles available to people for a small fee to make short trips. 

Christopher Curtis, chief planner with the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission, said the communities and the institution will be looking to obtain $1.1 million in federal transportation funds to buy the bicycles and build the bike stations.

Gov. Dannel Malloy/flickr creative commons

This week’s opening in New Haven of Alexion Pharmaceutical's new global headquarters marks the completion of the first phase of the city’s revitalization effort.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Shafida Kamal is 16. She had just moved to this country and then immediately started her freshman year at Bulkeley High School this fall. At the very beginning, it was rough.

Lori Mack / WNPR

Alexion Pharmaceuticals said it will have 1,000 workers at its new headquarters building in New Haven by the end of this month. Connecticut’s most successful homegrown bioscience company, Alexion showed off its global headquarters Monday. 

City of Bridgeport

Bridgeport Police Chief Joseph Gaudett has accepted a new position as emergency communications consultant in the Bridgeport Emergency Operations Center.

Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons

Hillary Clinton flew in to western Massachusetts on Monday morning, one day ahead of the Super Tuesday voting in more than a dozen states, including Massachusetts and Vermont. 

If you want to understand Clinton's Super Tuesday strategy all you need to do is look at her travel schedule: Georgia, Arkansas, Tennessee and Monday in Massachusetts and Virginia.

In these states she's delivering a relatively new, more positive message. There's less drawing contrasts with her primary opponent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and more talk of "breaking down barriers" and "love and kindness."

General Electric

The departure of General Electric hangs over this legislative session like a cloud. And the public debate over what it really means for Connecticut is still no clearer.

Police Leaders Call To Curb Deadly Force

Feb 17, 2016

A consortium of police officers and researchers is promoting a plan to prevent so-called “lawful but awful” fatal shootings involving law enforcement. The Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) has 30 recommendations for curtailing excessive force in the line of duty, from not shooting at vehicles to abandoning the “21-foot rule.”

The recommendations are contentious in many police departments. Denver Police Chief Robert White, a PERF board member, talks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about the recommendations and shifting police tactics.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

    

The Isham-Terry house, a lone Italianate villa, sits on a corner in Hartford within view of drivers headed eastbound on I-84. 

The house is the last of what was once an affluent neighborhood -- and it survived, though not without a fight, the construction of I-84 in the 1960s, one of the few historical buildings to avoid the wrecking balls of Hartford’s urban renewal projects. 

Hartford Yard Goats / Facebook

When the city of Hartford needed land for its $350 million stadium and downtown development project, it couldn’t come to an agreement with a certain property owner on a price. So the city took some of the land it wanted by force, and decided to pay $1.9 million for it -- an amount its owner said was "wholly inadequate."

Now, the matter is in court, and the two sides are in front of a judge arguing over how much the city should actually pay. 

Additional hearings have been scheduled to review the latest plans for the $950 million MGM Springfield casino. 

The Springfield City Council, which has already held four hearings on the site plan for the resort casino, has scheduled two additional hearings later this month. 

City Council President Mike Fenton said he’s been assured by MGM officials that the extended review will not hold up the construction of the casino which is scheduled to open in 2018.

Hartford's HartBeat Ensemble premieres a new work this weekend that draws on the stories of people from the city’s Asylum Hill neighborhood. It accompanies an effort by community leaders to inspire change in the neighborhood by working closely with the people who live there. 

Trombone Shorty

Troy Andrews has been playing the trombone since he was a boy, which is how he got the nickname he still uses: Trombone Shorty. This week, the New Orleans native is coming to UConn to perform.

In Immigration Reform Debate, Sanctuary Policies Take Center Stage

Jan 26, 2016
Arasmus Photo / Flickr Creative Commons

Sanctuary cities have become a focus in the national debate on immigration reform. But what are they? Where are they? And how do they affect communities around the country? 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin announced Wednesday a deal between the city, the developer of Hartford’s new minor league baseball stadium, and the Hartford Yard Goats that will cover a $10.3 million shortfall to complete the stadium.

The city said the stadium will be ready for the team's home opener on May 31. The stadium was originally scheduled to open April 7. 

To understand why General Electric would abandon its sprawling Fairfield, Connecticut, campus, for Boston’s waterfront, consider what one small, 30-person firm is looking for as it seeks out office space in the same neighborhood: showers.

“Because a lot of people are biking to work,” explained real estate broker Greg Hoffmeister. “They want to have that, or go running at lunch. So having a shower is pretty important.”

Office of Gov. Andrew Cuomo

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has some big changes planned for Penn Station in New York City. Among them: he wants to connect it to Metro-North, with a plan to build four new stations in The Bronx.

Denis-Carl Robidoux / Creative Commons

General Electric said in this week's announcement that it began considering a headquarters move three years ago: in other words, long before last spring's dust-up over Connecticut’s budget. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

General Electric confirmed on Wednesday afternoon that it will move its headquarters to Boston from Fairfield.

Vincent Scarano / Connecticut College

Picture a curbside lined with garbage. You may imagine old mattresses or discarded TVs, but there's one bit of trash your mind may block out: cigarette butts. An anthropology professor at Connecticut College has become obsessed with these often-overlooked artifacts of modern life, examining what they can tell us about our culture -- and the basics of archeology. 

MGM has announced major demolition work will begin next week as it prepares the site in downtown Springfield where a $950 million resort casino is planned.

Almost a year after the former Zanetti school building served as the backdrop for the MGM Springfield groundbreaking, it will be demolished beginning Tuesday, according to a press release from MGM. 

The much anticipated major construction work follows state environmental and city zoning approvals. 

MGM Springfield President Mike Mathis said the casino remains on track to open in the fall of 2018.

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