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Medicaid has become an increasingly important source of health insurance coverage for children in the United States. That’s especially true for children living in small towns and rural areas, according to a new report.

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The stereotypes around homeschooling have existed for decades. Since the modern homeschooling movement began in the late 20th century, those who favored this educational approach have largely been perceived as white, anti-establishment, radically Christian, and ultra-conservative.

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“Eat less, exercise more” is a familiar mantra, especially to anyone who has ever tried shedding a few pounds. But do those four words, in fact, hold the key to successful weight loss and management? 

He's not a real doctor. His friends and family called him Ted. Since his death in 1991, Theodor Seuss Geisel has become the best-selling author of children's books in the world.

Now the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, pays homage to its favorite native son with the first-of-its-kind Seuss Museum.

Lydia Brown / WNPR

"The Cat in the Hat comes back" to Springfield and he’s bringing a few of his friends. Yertle the Turtle, Horton, the Lorax -- all can be found at The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss, a museum honoring the life and legacy of children’s author Theodor Geisel. 

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More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

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This hour: family narratives -- how we share the stories of our lives and how those stories help shape who we are. 

Back in January, Republicans boasted they would deliver a "repeal and replace" bill for the Affordable Care Act to President Donald Trump's desk by the end of the month.

In the interim, that bravado has faded as their efforts stalled and they found out how complicated undoing a major law can be. With summer just around the corner, and most of official Washington swept up in scandals surrounding Trump, the health overhaul delays are starting to back up the rest of the 2018 agenda.

Dominik Skya flickr.com/photos/dominiksyka-photography/ / Creative Commons

Under current state law, children over the age of 13 who transmit or possess child pornography could be charged with a misdemeanor. Due to a legal loophole, younger children could face a more serious felony charge. But now there’s an effort to revise the law that governs juveniles who sext. 

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Nearly 1,400 new cases of lead-poisoned children under age 6 were reported in Connecticut in 2015, a slight drop from the year before, but more children showed higher levels of poisoning.

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Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults does not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

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If there's one thing we've never been good at, it's limiting ourselves. We eat too much junk food, watch too much TV, and engage in all manner of self-indulgence. So why then, do we continue to adhere to the limitations of monogamy? If love is so grand, why not celebrate a lifestyle which encourages loving multiple partners?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s been nearly 50 years since a US Supreme Court decision put an end to state laws banning interracial marriage.

This hour, we learn about the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia. Have society’s perceptions really changed from that landmark decision in 1967?

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

A bipartisan group of legislators and advocates are urging passage of a bill that would allow all pregnant women in Connecticut access to insurance coverage for pre- and post-natal care.

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

William Gantz flickr.com/photos/bilg/326347413 / Creative Commons

An estimated 95,000 young children in Connecticut under age six have experienced a potentially traumatic event. There's a new effort underway in the state to expand services focused on their developmental needs.

Violence in Syria took a horrible toll on the country's children last year, the United Nations' children's agency says, with the civil war blamed for killing at least 652 children — 255 of whom were either in or near a school.

In another unsettling trend, 851 children were recruited and used in the conflict in 2016 — double the figure who were recruited in 2015, UNICEF says. The agency says that children's deaths rose 20 percent and injuries rose by 25 percent.

The world is facing its greatest humanitarian crisis since 1945, says the United Nations humanitarian coordinator, Stephen O'Brien.

O'Brien told the U.N. Security Council on Friday that more than 20 million people across four countries in Africa and the Middle East are at risk of starvation and famine.

"We stand at a critical point in our history," he said. "Without collective and coordinated global efforts, people will simply starve to death."

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Thousands of Connecticut children have elevated levels of lead in their blood. This is often the result of lead dust in the home or in the soil outside.

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Get the lead out -- at least, that's what Connecticut renters Rosie Gallant and Adam Golka hoped to do after discovering the toxin in their Woodstock home. This hour, we hear their story and find out how repeated lead exposure has impacted the health of their infant daughter. 

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A new report from C-HIT -- the Connecticut Health Investigative Team -- looks at how emergency rooms across the state are grappling with a rising number of child mental health patients. The number is still mounting, it says, despite efforts to confront the issue by Governor Malloy and other officials. 

US Department of Education / Creative Commons

Billionaire Betsy DeVos is the new Secretary for the US Department of Education.

This hour, how will she impact public school education nationwide including here in Connecticut? We hear from educators within traditional public and charter schools — and we want to hear from you, too.

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Hundreds of undocumented immigrants have been rounded up during raids in major cities across the country in the past week. Immigration and Customs Enforcement reported more than 680 people were arrested nationwide, including 41 in New York City. ICE called the actions part of "routine, daily targeted operations."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

An investigation into Hartford Schools by the state's Office of the Child Advocate has found that a former high-ranking school administrator had a history of inappropriate contact with students, yet continued to be promoted through the system.

Confronting Youth Homelessness

Feb 6, 2017
Steve Hardy / Creative Commons

Year after year, hundreds of thousands of people find themselves homeless in the United States — including the young.

This hour, we explore local efforts to help homeless youth in Connecticut. What kinds of programs are out there to help them to not only find housing but employment, too?

Md saad andalib / Creative Commons

It’s been nearly 50 years since a US Supreme Court decision put an end to state laws banning interracial marriage.

This hour, we learn about the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia. Have society’s perceptions really changed from that landmark decision in 1967?

marc thiele/flickr creative commons

Public health officials worldwide are calling on their governments to get tough on alcohol marketing. A special issue of the scientific journal Addiction, edited by a UConn professor, finds that alcohol marketing to young people has a direct link to early drinking. And social media also plays a crucial role. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A new report gives voice to some of Connecticut's youngest domestic violence victims -- children six years old and younger. This hour, we take a look at the findings from that report and consider what’s being done to improve services for children who experience trauma. 

From the book The Human Body and Health Revised by Alvin Davison, 1908 / Public Domain

As many young people try out the new headphones and earbuds they received as holiday gifts, doctors have a warning: they pose a potential health hazard. Studies show hearing loss among kids and teens is up about 30 percent higher than it was in the '80s and '90s. 

PBS

For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series "Sesame Street."

Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

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