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Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Ethel Walker School in Simsbury recently hosted a fair showcasing its STEAM summer program. The program gives kids in pre-K through fifth grade from Hartford Public Schools an opportunity to develop skills in the fields of science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Local advocates for migrant children separated from their parents at the United States border said Monday that they don’t believe the Trump administration will meet a court-ordered deadline to bring the families together. The deadline imposed by a U.S. district court in California is July 26.

Max Pixel

A four-year old boy died Thursday in West Haven after being left in a hot car. The victim’s two year old brother who was also in the vehicle, was taken to hospital but survived. The vehicle was parked outside an apartment complex in town, but the exact circumstances of the death aren’t yet clear, and police say the incident is still being investigated.

Wavebreakmedia / iStock

As fertility rates fall nationwide, Connecticut continues to rank among the lowest in the country—a trend doctors attribute to women here delaying childbearing.

Books DAMSELFLY and THE DIALOGUES
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Check out some of the titles recommended during this episode here.

Now that it’s summer, it’s time to head to the beach with a good book! For many of us, vacation is one of the few times we get to read for fun. Don’t know what book to pick up? Where We Live has got you covered.

A Harvard brain scientist who studies trauma in children is warning of lasting damage to the young migrants who've been separated from their parents at the border.

Pexels

Pregnancy is lifechanging, but for some women, that may come at the cost of their career.

This hour: A New York Times investigation looked at thousands of lawsuits by women and found that pregnancy discrimination is widespread in many American companies. We find out more from reporter Natalie Kitroeff.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Two immigrant children are suing the federal government after being separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border and transported 2,000 miles to Connecticut.

Ingrid Henlon has been working in Hartford as an early childhood teacher for 27 years, but she said she hasn't gotten a raise in a decade.

"I'm a single person, and every year, you know, everything goes up," she said. "The light goes up, the gas goes up, the rent keep going up, but for the past couple of years my paycheck has been the consistent amount."

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

A new Connecticut Public Radio series spotlights autism spectrum disorder -- with insight into the lives and experiences of young children and their families.

This hour, we speak with the series' creator, Dr. Thyde Dumont-Mathieu, and hear from a Connecticut mother whose son is on the spectrum.

Department of Health and Human Services

Governor Dannel Malloy recently wrote to Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar to say he’s prepared to dedicate state resources to reunite migrant children with their parents. Some immigration lawyers say that’s easier said than done.

Creative Commons

U.S. President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday halting the at-the-border separation of immigrant children and families. Coming up, we wade through the details of the decision and consider its significance moving forward. 

Later, we talk about chronic pain and its impact on young children. We hear from a Connecticut mother whose son was diagnosed with amplified musculoskeletal pain syndrome (AMPS) and learn about the out-of-state program that treated him.

Michele Lamberti / Creative Commons

Guilt. Ah, yes, that awful, anxiety-ridden five-letter word. Most of us have experienced it. All of us have learned to dread it. But is a little guilt really such a bad thing?

This hour, we consider that question and more with a series of guilt (note we did not say “guilty”) experts. We check in with a researcher at the University of Virginia and with a psychologist based in New York. And we want to hear from you, too. 

Catherine Boyce

This hour, Save the Children U.S. President and CEO Carolyn Miles joins us. We talk about her decades-long career and learn about the unconventional journey that led her to the Fairfield-based NGO.

It’s the latest conversation in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series, featuring prominent women with ties to the state. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

A new Connecticut Public Radio series spotlights autism spectrum disorder -- with insight into the lives and experiences of young children and their families.

This hour, we speak with the series' creator, Dr. Thyde Dumont-Mathieu, and hear from a Connecticut mother whose son is on the spectrum.

Seeing Things Differently: Where To Turn For Help Before And After Autism Diagnosis?

May 2, 2018
Lisa Wilson (top right) with her family in Hartford, Connecticut. Her son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Parent Lisa Wilson wasn’t sure if her son was developing the skills he should for his age. “He wasn't talking as a typical two-year-old would've been talking,” she said.

Feverpitched / Thinkstock

New federal data find that about one in 59 children has autism spectrum disorder.

Michele Lamberti / Creative Commons

Guilt. Ah, yes, that awful, anxiety-ridden five-letter word. Most of us have experienced it. All of us have learned to dread it. But is a little guilt really such a bad thing?

This hour, we consider that question and more with a series of guilt (note we did not say “guilty”) experts. We check in with a researcher at the University of Virginia and with a psychologist based in New York. And we want to hear from you, too. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When it comes to the nation’s opioid crisis, substance abuse affects more than the addict. More and more children are entering the foster care system every year at an unprecedented rate.

Kadia Doumbia gives testimony at a public hearing.
CT-N

The state legislature is considering a bill that would outlaw female genital mutilation. While federal law already prohibits the practice, Connecticut is one of 24 states where there is no specific state law making FGM a crime, meaning the state itself cannot bring a prosecution. 

yardenxanthe / flickr

Slime is not something we often think about. But there are plenty of reasons why that should probably change: From the theory that life on Earth may have have first emerged from a primordial ooze, to the current slime-making craze that's sweeping the internet.

Updated at 3:44 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday handed the Trump administration a setback over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which shields hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation.

The court declined to take up a key case dealing with the Obama-era DACA — for now.

The high court said an appeals court should hear the case first. The result is DACA will stay in place until or if the Supreme Court takes it up.

Fran Rabinowitz, the president of the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents, called for changes to gun legislation Thursday at East Hartford High School. She was supported by student leadership at the school.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

East Hartford High School students are joining a national chorus of voices against gun violence. They want to be heard by legislators in Washington D.C.

Vladimir Pustovit / Creative Commons

There are many questions a young woman will face as she matures. Among them: What is her timeline for building a family? And how many kids does she expect to have?

But not all women want to become mothers. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When we hear the words “autism diagnosis” it’s common to imagine a young child or adolescent.

But what about those who receive their diagnoses at a later stage of life -- in the midst of successful careers or long, happy marriages?

Vladimir Pustovit / Creative Commons

There are many questions a young woman will face as she matures. Among them: What is her timeline for building a family? And how many kids does she expect to have?

But not all women want to become mothers. 

Till Westermayer / Flickr

For someone with food allergies, a taste of peanut butter or a bite of shellfish could be life-threatening.

Erowid Center

It’s been declared a national public health emergency. In the United States, the annual number of deaths from opioid overdose has surpassed the number of deaths during the height of the AIDS epidemic in the ‘90s.

But opioid users aren’t the only victims of this crisis. 

Dr. Mahendra Patel, a pediatric cancer doctor, has begun giving away medications to some of his young patients, determined not to disrupt their treatments for serious illnesses like leukemia. He's worried Congress will fail to renew funding soon for a health program that pays for the care of millions of children across the country.

Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs Office Follow / Creative Commons

Make room, troops. Recently, the Boy Scouts of America unveiled a major decision -- starting this year, the organization will begin admitting girls. Yes, that’s right. Girls.

While the news has been met with applause by some, others have expressed more critical views -- including the Girl Scouts. This hour, we find out why. 

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