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Judy Dworin Performance Project

When Suzi Jensen went to see her mom in prison at the age of 12 she was only allowed to hug her twice, once at the beginning of the visit and once at the end.

Toy guns have been a popular item on Christmas gift wish lists for decades. Little Ralphie Parker from the 1983 holiday classic A Christmas Story spends most of the movie wishing for a “Red Ryder Carbine Action 200-shot Range Model Air Rifle.”

Many toy guns look more real than toy, however, which has city officials, law enforcement and safety experts across the country urging parents to use extreme caution when purchasing them for children.

Kids' Work Chicago Daycare / Creative Commons

The Office of the State Child Advocate has released a report on the deaths of nine young children who died while in licensed and unlicensed day care settings. The report recommends a host of measures, including more funding so low-income families can access quality child care.

Updated at 4:57 p.m. ET Friday

A 7-year-old Guatemalan girl who crossed the southern border into the United States illegally earlier this month died of dehydration and shock after being apprehended by the U.S. Border Patrol in New Mexico.

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

In the office; on the scale.

To what extent have physicians and other medical professionals contributed to the stigmatization of obesity? This hour, we take an in-depth look.

We also discuss the effects of obesity and weight stigma on children. What responsibilities do parents, pediatricians, and educators share in keeping kids healthy and safe? 

The Sleep Judge / Creative Commons

Many women who become pregnant miscarry without knowing it. Yet miscarriage is not something we, as a society, often talk about. Why?

This hour, we take an in-depth look and we also hear from you. Have you or a loved one ever miscarried? Where did you turn for support? 

Erin Blinn-Curran / Connecticut Children's Medical Center

Some brands of slime, sirens and smart toys should be avoided this holiday season according to the 33rd annual Trouble in Toyland report. The highly toxic chemical boron is used in six different slime brands. Boron can cause nausea, vomiting and reproductive issues, posing a threat to the health of children and adults.

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The Norwich Roman Catholic Diocese is facing 20 new lawsuits alleging years of sexual abuse at a residential boarding school.

Damian Bariexca/flickr creative commons

Several child advocacy groups warn that some apps targeted at small children are potentially dangerous and costly. 

Outreach Programs Target Asthma Hot Spots, But More Help Is Needed

Nov 18, 2018
Robert Carmon, and dad, Chaz demonstrate the inhaler used twice daily to control Robert's asthma.
Steve Hamm / C-HIT.org

Robert Carmon had a rough start to life. Shortly after birth he developed asthma, a chronic disease that causes inflammation in the lungs and difficulty breathing. His attacks were so severe as an infant that his parents rushed him to the emergency room practically every week. They were terrified he might die.

Catherine Boyce

This hour, Save the Children U.S. President and CEO Carolyn Miles joins us. We talk about her decades-long career and learn about the unconventional journey that led her to the Fairfield-based NGO.

It’s the latest conversation in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series, featuring prominent women with ties to the state. 

thetruthpreneur / Creative Commons

The National Council for Adoption has reported a decline in U.S. intercountry adoptions since the year 2004.

This hour, we discuss the factors driving this downward shift and consider how it compares to trends in the adoption of children born domestically.

We also hear from two Connecticut residents with unique adoption experiences -- one as an adoptive father, the other as an adopted son.

If you have an adoption story you want to share, we want to hear from you, too.

Girl Scouts of the USA wants to take Boy Scouts of America to court. The organization has filed a federal lawsuit accusing the Boy Scouts of trademark infringement.

This started last October, when the Boy Scouts said it would start allowing girls to join its programs.

Midwives Could Be Key To Reversing Maternal Mortality Trends

Nov 1, 2018
Caitlin DePasquale of Norwalk looks on as midwife Lindsay Lachant measures her abdomen during Depasquale's appointment at the Connecticut Childbirth & Women's Center in Danbury.
Credit: Melanie Stengel / C-HIT.org

The Connecticut Childbirth & Women’s Center in Danbury is a 50-minute drive from Evelyn DeGraf’s home in Westchester. Pregnant with her second child, the 37-year-old didn’t hesitate to make the drive—she wanted her birth to be attended by a midwife, not a doctor.

Dave White / Creative Commons

For interview highlights from this show, click here. 

It’s been fifteen years since the death of Fred Rogers -- a man who, for decades, served as the cardigan-donning host and creator of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Rogers’ life is now the focus of a new Maxwell King biography -- aptly titled The Good Neighbor. This hour, we sit down with King for a special preview of the book. 

Danielle Vukadinovich is sitting up in a hospital bed at the Inova Women's Hospital in Falls Church, Va., waiting to give birth.

"I feel good, I'm excited!" says Vukadinovich, 35, of Annandale, Va., "Nervous, but good!"

Vukadinovich is getting a cesarean section today. It's the second time for her — she underwent the surgical procedure 19 months ago when her twins were born.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley has announced she will resign from the post by year's end, raising questions and speculation as to who will fill the high-ranking vacancy.

This hour, we examine one possible candidate: former Connecticut U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman. What qualifications would Lieberman bring to the position? And what would it take for him to be confirmed?

Later, we talk about trends in U.S. civics education. Are children who are exposed to the topic earlier more likely to develop into engaged voters?

And finally, controversy surrounding New Britain’s Paul Manafort Sr. Drive has drawn attention to a lesser-known Connecticut son, Ebenezer Bassett. Who was he? And how should the state honor his legacy? 

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

In the office; on the scale.

To what extent have physicians and other medical professionals contributed to the stigmatization of obesity? This hour, we take an in-depth look.

We also discuss the effects of obesity and weight stigma on children. What responsibilities do parents, pediatricians, and educators share in keeping kids healthy and safe? 

Julie Jordan Scott / Creative Commons

A lot of you reading this are familiar with the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder because you watched the popular "Little House on the Prairie" television show that ran from 1974-1983.

But the television show came long after Laura Ingalls Wilder began sharing the story of her family's journey through the open frontier. She shared her memories in a series of beloved Little House books that spanned a life of pioneering both before and after the government declared the frontier closed. She speaks in simple and intimate prose of everyday life that fascinated millions of young readers who wanted to live like Laura. Fans today still want to believe in the absolute truth of every word. 

Ervins Strauhmanis / Creative Commons

Three Merrimack Valley, Massachusetts neighborhoods were marred by natural gas explosions Thursday, in an incident that left one dead and several others injured. This hour, we take an in-depth look at what happened and consider the likelihood that a similar situation could unfold here in Connecticut.

Later, we learn why some local residents and advocates are airing their grievances against Veyo, the company contracted to provide non-emergency transportation to adults and children on Medicaid. How did the California-based enterprise come to operate in Connecticut in the first place? We find out.

And finally, we wade through the known and unknown effects of e-cigarette use, and find out why the electronic tobacco devices are so fashionable among youths today. Have you owned or smoked an e-cigarette? What about your child or children? We want to hear from you. 

thetruthpreneur / Creative Commons

The National Council for Adoption has reported a decline in U.S. intercountry adoptions since the year 2004.

This hour, we discuss the factors driving this downward shift and consider how it compares to trends in the adoption of children born domestically.

We also hear from two Connecticut residents with unique adoption experiences -- one as an adoptive father, the other as an adopted son.

If you have an adoption story you want to share, we want to hear from you, too.

Books DAMSELFLY and THE DIALOGUES
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Check out some of the titles recommended during this episode here.

Now that it’s summer, it’s time to head to the beach with a good book! For many of us, vacation is one of the few times we get to read for fun. Don’t know what book to pick up? Where We Live has got you covered.

Rogelio A. Galaviz C. / Flickr

It’s difficult to imagine children’s programming without the impact of Fred Rogers. For nearly 50 years, Rogers pioneered a model for how children can learn, discover themselves and grow by watching tailor-made programs. Now, 15 years after his death, his legacy continues thanks to a documentary, an upcoming film, and now a new biography that chronicles his life.

Two Central American children who were taken from their parents at the U.S. border will get legal immigration status for a year, under an unusual settlement with the government.

Dave White / Creative Commons

For interview highlights from this show, click here. 

It’s been fifteen years since the death of Fred Rogers -- a man who, for decades, served as the cardigan-donning host and creator of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Rogers’ life is now the focus of a new Maxwell King biography -- aptly titled The Good Neighbor. This hour, we sit down with King for a special preview of the book. 

Sen. Richard Blumenthal said the price for a pair of EpiPens is between $600 and $700.
Phillip Bradshaw (Flickr) / Creative Commons

At the start of the school year, officials say they’re concerned about the price and availability of epinephrine for kids who need it. The drug can be administered by an EpiPen to anyone having an allergy attack and goes into anaphylactic shock.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Sophie Zezula, 10, unveiled her “Snow Straw” at a Ridgefield invention convention five months before American cities began outlawing plastic straws and five months before lawmakers in other Connecticut towns like Hamden and Stonington revealed that they were pondering a ban.

Catherine Boyce

This hour, Save the Children U.S. President and CEO Carolyn Miles joins us. We talk about her decades-long career and learn about the unconventional journey that led her to the Fairfield-based NGO.

It’s the latest conversation in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series, featuring prominent women with ties to the state. 

Pexels

Pregnancy is lifechanging, but for some women, that may come at the cost of their career.

This hour: A New York Times investigation looked at thousands of lawsuits by women and found that pregnancy discrimination is widespread in many American companies. We find out more from reporter Natalie Kitroeff.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Ethel Walker School in Simsbury recently hosted a fair showcasing its STEAM summer program. The program gives kids in pre-K through fifth grade from Hartford Public Schools an opportunity to develop skills in the fields of science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics.

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