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It was supposed to be Indiana Gov. Mike Pence's political coming-out party, but drama with Ted Cruz largely overshadowed his moment at the Republican National Convention.

The crowd quickly turned on Cruz on Wednesday night after he refused to endorse GOP nominee Donald Trump.

The Texas senator and Republican primary runner-up was initially met with a warm reception, holding the crowd in the palm of his hand as he told emotional stories about the recent police shootings in Dallas and how America had to defend the Constitution and the freedoms of speech and religion.

Ida Mae Astute/ABC / Creative Commons

Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie put Hillary Clinton on trial, and the delegates heard from some of Donald Trump's children, as well as House Speaker Paul Ryan.

After repeatedly denying that elements of a 2008 speech by Michelle Obama were used in Melania Trump's address on the first night of the Republican National Convention, an employee of the Trump Organization took responsibility for the flap on Wednesday.

In a statement issued by the Trump campaign, staff writer Meredith McIver accepted responsibility for the addition of Michelle Obama's words in the speech.

Mallory Benedict / PBS NewsHour

It’s the biggest party for Republicans since…well, 2012. GOP lawmakers, retired military leaders, and soap opera stars speak this week in Cleveland as the national Republican party puts a ring on Donald Trump. Our panel will provide mid-convention analysis and updates on the speeches, controversies, and theatrics that are on full-display in Ohio.

Tuesday was technically Donald Trump's night — he officially received the party's presidential nomination — but as it went on, the speakers at the Republican National Convention homed in on his rival, Hillary Clinton, and not what he would do as president.

Tuesday night's session of the Republican National Convention departed dramatically from the previous night's events, proving far less devoted to dread and more consumed with celebration.

But the theme of the session — "Make American Work Again" — was far from dominant or even evident in the evening's program.

On a bright note: It was the night of the official roll call, when each state gets a moment in the spotlight. As is expected, all of the delegation chairs got to toss off some happy horsefeathers about their home state before announcing their delegate count.

Republicans have officially nominated Donald Trump as their presidential nominee, with his home state of New York putting him over the top.

Ida Mae Astute/ABC / Creative Commons

The Republican National Convention officially got underway Monday night in Cleveland, with the theme Make America Safe Again.

New Hampshire’s Republican delegation is in Cleveland for day two of the party’s national convention.

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers is reporting from Cleveland this week. He spoke with Morning Edition's Rick Ganley about what they delegation is up to, and how they feel about what's transpired so far.

The outcome of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland is predetermined: Donald Trump will get his party’s nomination for president. But there was controversy nonetheless for the 16-person Vermont delegation.

A chaotic first day at the Republican National Convention gave way to an emotional evening centered on national security and capped off by a rousing speech by Donald Trump's wife, Melania.

Erik Drost / flickr.com/photos/edrost88 / Creative Commons

The Republican National Convention officially got underway on Monday in Cleveland, Ohio.

Republicans drafting the party's platform in Cleveland this week rejected appeals to soften language opposing same-sex marriage.

According to NPR, delegates supported language in this year's platform that says children "deserve a married mom and dad," and refers to "natural marriage" as between a man and a woman. 

The Republican National Convention begins in Cleveland on Monday. Republicans will hear from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and Tennessee Senator Bob Corker, who are billed as official Trump-Pence surrogates, as well as CNBC contributor Larry Kudlow.

Mallory Benedict / PBS NewsHour

Most of Connecticut’s delegation arrived this weekend in Cleveland for the Republican National Convention. All are committed to Donald Trump, who won nearly 60% of the Republican vote in the state’s primary.

Organizers of this week's Republican National Convention unveiled their program and theme late Sunday, on the eve of the gathering's first session. The theme — "Make America Great Again" — will surprise no one who has heard of Donald Trump and been sentient in the year 2016.

Many people may not even realize that conventions have themes, as most are forgotten soon after the last balloon has fallen. But as the Trump convention gets underway, it's worth a moment of reflection on the theme of the last Republican nominating extravaganza.

Donald Trump is running for president as a Washington outsider. Yet to manage his campaign, he's picked someone who is very much a Washington insider. Paul Manafort has been a political operative and lobbyist for years, including for some controversial figures seeking to influence U.S. politics.

Donald Trump could stand to benefit from his reported vice presidential pick Mike Pence in a number of ways, in particular from his strong Christian identity, which might help Trump gain needed support in evangelical communities.

But Pence initially endorsed Ted Cruz, albeit without enthusiasm, and there were some reports that the Indiana governor disliked Trump. Less than a week after Cruz dropped out, Pence endorsed Trump.

After weeks of speculation, presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump tweeted Friday morning that he has chosen Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate.

Trump had planned to hold a press conference Friday morning, but he canceled that after a deadly attack in France. He has now scheduled a news conference for Saturday at 11 a.m in New York City.

Pence quote-tweeted Trump's announcement, adding that he is "honored" to join the ticket and "work to make America great again."

This post was updated Oct. 1 at 10:19 a.m.

Last Monday, the first presidential debate was the most-watched debate ever. A little more than a week later, the Hillary Clinton's and Donald Trump's vice presidential picks will take the stage.

Peter Thiel, Antonio Sabato, Jr., and precisely zero former Republican presidential nominees — that's who will reportedly be speaking at the Republican convention next week.

The Republican National Committee has released a list of 62 speakers for next week's convention, and it is notable both for who is on it and who is not on it. Trump's convention will have the star power of a famous tech entrepreneur and a former soap opera actor (Sabato).

The leaders of a Connecticut American Indian tribe are accusing Donald Trump’s presidential campaign of disrespecting Native Americans. In a statement released on Thursday, the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation calls Trump’s campaign tactics and behavior bigoted and ignorant.  

Bernie Sanders is expected to endorse Hillary Clinton on Tuesday at an event in New Hampshire, a Democratic source with knowledge of discussions between the two campaigns tell NPR's Tamara Keith.

Clinton secured enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination just over a month ago, but Sanders has stayed in the campaign — though he kept a lower profile.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch, accepting the recommendation of FBI Director James Comey and others in the Department of Justice, is formally closing the investigation of Hillary Clinton's private email server without bringing any criminal charges.

The investigation centered on the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee's use of the server while she was secretary of state. Lynch announced the decision in a statement Wednesday, saying Comey and "career prosecutors and agents" unanimously recommended that the investigation be closed without charges.

Tuesday was a mixed bag for Hillary Clinton.

She escaped a recommendation of an indictment from the FBI, removing the biggest storm cloud over her in this presidential campaign.

But it did not come without significant pain for Clinton, because while FBI Director James Comey did not recommend a formal indictment to the Department of Justice, he served up an indictment of her judgment.

The long-running drama over Hillary Clinton's use of a personal email server during her time as secretary of state came to some resolution today as FBI Director James Comey announced that while Clinton was "extremely careless" in handling classified information, she should not face charges.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said she "fully expects" to endorse the recommendations of career prosecutors and FBI agents investigating the security of Hillary Clinton's email server, but stopped short of recusing herself from the politically charged case.

In an interview in Aspen, Colo., Lynch said she regrets that her unscheduled meeting with former President Bill Clinton on a Phoenix airport tarmac this week has "cast a shadow" over the investigation into his wife's email practices at the State Department.

The past month has not been kind to Donald Trump.

He has landed in controversy on everything from how much he (eventually) gave to veterans groups to Trump University (and the judge who he declared biased because of his Mexican heritage) to his response to the Orlando shooting.

His poll numbers are sinking. His TV blitz is nowhere to be seen. Big donors aren't flocking to him.

And if Donald Trump needed more tangible evidence of problems in his campaign, it's in reports filed Monday at the Federal Election Commission.

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