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Joyce Barnes sometimes pauses, leaving the grocery store. A crowd shifts past, loaded up with goodies. Barnes pictures herself, walking out with big steaks and pork chops, some crabmeat.

"But I'm not the one," she says. Inside her bags are bread, butter, coffee, a bit of meat and canned tuna — a weekly grocery budget of $25.

Connecticut Public

The Hartford has rejected Chubb's $23 billion acquisition bid. Insurance industry expert Frederick McKinney of Quinnipiac University spoke to Connecticut Public Radio's All Things Considered about why he thinks the company made this decision, and whether the saga is really over.

Onasill ~ Bill / Creative Commons

With The Hartford’s rejection of a takeover offer from Chubb comes speculation about the next move in a potential insurance industry consolidation that could get personal for Connecticut. 

Most analysts believe the Swiss giant -- with its U.S. headquarters in New Jersey -- will come back with an improved bid for the Connecticut insurer.

The board of directors of Connecticut insurer The Hartford has unanimously rejected an unsolicited takeover bid from rival Chubb. The Swiss based insurance company had made an offer that valued The Hartford at around $23 billion. But The Hartford says such a deal is not in the best interests of the company and its shareholders.

Many Americans are ready and eager to buy a home right now. But they're having trouble finding one.

Home sales edged down 6.6% in February compared with the previous month because there just aren't enough houses out there for people to buy.

That lack of supply is also driving up prices as bidding wars break out with multiple offers on many homes.

"The housing market is out of whack," says Lawrence Yun, chief economist at the National Association of Realtors. "There's a lot of demand, but the supply is not coming along."

A draft report critical of a utility’s response to Tropical Storm Isaias has Connecticut lawmakers again calling for accountability.

The report released late Friday by the state’s Public Utility Regulatory Authority concluded that Eversource’s preparations and response were inadequate and said fines and penalties will be considered under state law, thought it didn’t specify what those might be.

Connecticut Public Radio

Insurance giant Chubb has made an unsolicited $23.24 billion offer to acquire locally based The Hartford Financial Services Group. To mull over what will and what could happen here, insurance industry expert Frederick McKinney of Quinnipiac visited with All Things Considered.

Connecticut Public

Storied Connecticut insurance company The Hartford says it is considering a takeover bid from fellow insurer Chubb. The Swiss company has offered $65 a share for the Hartford, valuing the company at approximately $23 billion.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut lawmakers passed a bill two years ago that gradually increases the state minimum wage to levels that will peak in 2023 at $15 per hour. At first glance, that seems like a win for working people. But Lauren Ruth, research and policy director with Connecticut Voices for Children, has co-authored a report that says with the state taking away key benefits at the same time, the minimum wage hike represents only a partial win for working people.

Whether or not you want an electric vehicle in your driveway, you might soon spot one showing up on your curb.

All major delivery companies are starting to replace their gas-powered fleets with electric or low-emission vehicles, a switch that companies say will boost their bottom lines, while also fighting climate change and urban pollution.

UPS has placed an order for 10,000 electric delivery vehicles. Amazon is buying 100,000 from the start-up Rivian. DHL says zero-emission vehicles make up a fifth of its fleet, with more to come.

Updated March 12, 2021 at 1:02 PM ET

Jennifer Bates often finds peace by drinking tea on her patio. But these days, to use her words — the butterflies have filled up her stomach and won't go away.

"Butterflies normally come to calm me," Bates says. "But this is ... nerve-racking to think I don't know how it's gonna go."

Entrepreneur Keitra Bates stands in a gleaming glass-front retail shop in a new development on the south side of Atlanta.

"We're looking at almost 2,000-sq-ft. of raw space," she says, pointing out the floor-to-ceiling windows that face onto Atlanta's popular Beltline, railways converted to trails and parks encircling the city.

This will soon be the second location for a business she started called Marddy's — short for Market Buddies, a shared kitchen where home cooks can prepare their goods, and collectively market them.

Movie theaters in Chicago, Houston, Phoenix and Philadelphia have been open for months. But attendance remains low, not just because of public safety concerns—but because there isn't much to see. Major studios are delaying their blockbusters, or releasing them straight to streaming.

One big reason? The two biggest movie markets in the country, New York City and Los Angeles, remain closed.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

The Biden administration will suspend steep tariffs on Irish and Scotch whiskies, English cheeses and other products, after reaching an agreement with the U.K. Former President Trump had imposed the tariffs in late 2019 as part of a long-running dispute over the aviation industry.

The Federal Aviation Administration must address "weaknesses" in its oversight of Boeing that led the agency to miss flaws that contributed to two deadly crashes involving the Boeing 737 Max aircraft, a federal watchdog has found.

An inspector general's report from the Department of Transportation said U.S. aviation regulators do not understand the plane's flight control software that caused two devastating crashes in 2018 and 2019.

Connecticut Touts Real Estate Boom Stemming From Pandemic

Feb 23, 2021
Fuse / Thinkstock

Thousands of new residents have come to Connecticut during the coronavirus pandemic with workers in New York, Boston and elsewhere looking to relocate as they work from home, the state’s economic development officials said.

One of Connecticut’s largest independent banks, People’s United, is be acquired by M&T Bank based in Buffalo, NY in a $7.6 billion deal.

Facebook will restore news pages in Australia after the government agreed to change a proposed law forcing tech companies to pay publishers for news content.

The new law would force Google and Facebook to pay Australian news publishers for stories with terms of a deal set by a third party, had they not been able to negotiate payout agreements with local publishers themselves.

Google agreed to follow the law after striking a deal with the nation's biggest publishers. Facebook protested and yanked news content from its site in Australia last Thursday.

As Britain’s exit from the European Union becomes a reality, the British Consul General to New England will be hosting a virtual visit to Connecticut this week to talk about trade opportunities. Dr. Peter Abbott and First Secretary of Trade Policy Tom Nickalls, will meet with Connecticut officials and business leaders, and the event includes a town hall-style meeting with Connecticut exporters about transatlantic business.

Sage Ross / Creative Commons

A hedge fund will purchase the parent company of Connecticut’s Hartford Courant, the nation’s oldest continuously published newspaper.

Alden Global Capital is poised to take complete ownership of Tribune Publishing and most of its subsidiaries, including the Courant, New York Daily News and Chicago Tribune. The deal will not become official until shareholders agree to the purchase.

Former President Donald Trump's shuttered hotel and casino in Atlantic City, N.J., was demolished Wednesday morning, collapsing amid gentle cheers from the crowd.

At about 9 a.m., a series of controlled explosions were heard before the 39-story building imploded on itself. The whole process unfolded in less than 30 seconds, from start to finish.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

Hiring resumed just tepidly last month after a slump in December, as the labor market faces a long climb to recover the millions of jobs lost during the pandemic.

U.S. employers added 49,000 jobs in January, after a revised drop of 227,000 the month before. Unemployment fell to 6.3%, from 6.7% in December, as hundreds of thousands of people left the workforce.

Industries that saw notable job gains in January include business and professional services and finance, but bars and restaurants continued to lose jobs.

Updated at 8:28 p.m. ET

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos will step down as the company's chief executive officer this summer, after more than a quarter-century at the helm of the retail, logistics and tech powerhouse.

Updated at 4:32 p.m. ET

The GameStop stock-market roller coaster continued Friday as the video game retailer's shares shot up, the online broker Robinhood struggled for cash and securities regulators issued a stern warning for anyone trying to game the market.

Catapulted by seemingly unrelenting enthusiasm on Reddit, GameStop stock soared nearly 68%.

Even before Amazon built its warehouse in Bessemer, Ala., local officials called it a game-changer.

The mayor said it was the largest single investment in the 130-year history of the city. Birmingham's working-class suburb is a shadow of the steel and mining hub it used to be. Amazon jobs, paying more than double the state's minimum wage of $7.25, promised a shot in the arm.

Updated at 4:51 p.m. ET

What the deal with GameStop?

There's a good chance you have heard that question many times in the past few days.

Consumer watchdog groups are applauding President Biden's pick of Gary Gensler to run the Securities and Exchange Commission. They say that there is much to do to protect everyday Americans who invest their retirement or other savings in the market and that Gensler has proved he can get that done.

But progressives were a lot more skeptical about Gensler back in 2009 when he was first chosen to be a top financial regulator. That's because, in some ways, Gensler is the ultimate Wall Street insider.

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

Restaurants and bars are reeling from persistent spikes of coronavirus cases and related restrictions in their communities, driving retail spending in December down for the third month in a row.

In a file photo, the Berlin train station at night.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

COVID has changed the way we live, work, even move. This hour, we talk about the future of public transportation in Connecticut, with commuter advocate Jim Cameron. We also hear from the State Department of Transportation (DOT) public transit bureau chief.

Ridership has plummeted on rains and buses as many residents continue to work from home. This, even as Connecticut’s often-overlooked bus systems have been critical for many of the state’s essential workers to get to their jobs.

Will Connecticut’s mass transit system be able to recover from the economic toll of COVID?

Richard Drew / Associated Press

Connecticut’s own William Tong is one of 48 state attorneys general suing Facebook over its alleged anti-competitive practices. What’s the harm of Facebook’s practices? And what are the chances this lawsuit will succeed? To answer those questions, we invited Bloomberg News journalist Sarah Frier to join us on All Thing Considered. She covers social media companies extensively, and she’s written a book called No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram.

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