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Updated at 12:23 p.m. ET

A few years ago, money was very tight for Chasity Wohlford. The Houston resident, who was working a low-wage job, needed to fly to Colorado for a family emergency. She says a friend told her, "Oh, just go to this payday lender. It's super easy." But Wohlford ended up over her head in debt after taking out that loan.

Want To Read Ned Lamont’s Playbook? Start Here.

Oct 29, 2019
Courtesy: Governor's Office

Gov. Ned Lamont engaged in two of his favorite pastimes Tuesday: Drawing boldface corporate CEOs, academics and philanthropists into public-private partnerships, and tilting at the silos he believes prevent government agencies from working efficiently in common cause.

Scott Leighton / Creative Commons

Hearst Connecticut Media has published a series of reports on data that shows workplace sexual harassment and abuse remain a serious problem across all industries in the state.

The region's largest dairy cooperative will impose a new pricing system in January in an effort to curb excess milk production.

It's a pivotal time for LGBTQ people in the workplace. Last week, the Supreme Court heard arguments in cases testing whether people in that community are protected by the country's workplace anti-discrimination laws.

This month marks 20 years since General Electric Co. signed an agreement to clean up PCBs the company had dumped in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

Courtesy: Techstars

The latest class of start-up companies being fostered by Stanley Black & Decker at its Hartford accelerator will show off their innovations Monday, in an event the company calls Demo Day

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

U.S. employers added 136,000 jobs in September — a sign of continued resilience in the labor market amid growing signals that the economy is losing steam.

The unemployment rate fell to 3.5% — the lowest since December 1969 — but the pace of hiring has slowed from last year. The jobless rate was 3.7% in August.

Job gains for the two previous months were revised up by a total of 45,000.

Bob Orozco barks out instructions like a drill sergeant. The 40 or so older adults in this class follow his lead, stretching and bending and marching in place.

It goes like this for nearly an hour, with 89-year-old Orozco doing every move he asks of his class. He does that in each of the 11 classes he teaches every week at this YMCA in Laguna Niguel, Calif.

"I probably will work until something stops me," Orozco says.

Updated at 10:31 a.m. on September 30, 2019 

A new report says the construction of MGM Springfield added more than half a billion dollars to the economy of Massachusetts. 

MGM Springfield says it had slightly more than 2,000 employees at the end of June. That's according to the company's latest report to the Massachusetts Gaming Commission.

David Lofink / Creative Commons

Venture into any of Connecticut's municipal centers and you will likely notice an empty storefront … or two or three or, well, you get the point.

This hour, we ask: What impact do these vacancies have on the vitality of local communities? And what resources are available to help these communities attract and retain more retail businesses?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

 

Veteran radio reporter and editor John Dankosky is leaving Connecticut Public, the organization announced Monday. 

Dankosky, who has worked at the company for 25 years and is the executive editor of the New England News Collaborative, has taken a voluntary separation option offered to longtime employees.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Cocktail hour at Downton Abbey is always high drama for the fictional inhabitants of the stately home, and every revelation around the dinner table is usually accompanied by at least a few glasses of alcohol. But for one Connecticut entrepreneur, it wasn't the staged high life that inspired a spirited idea -- it was a peek inside the real-life castle where the series is filmed.

Gambling revenue at MGM Springfield was up 2.7% in August from the previous month. That's according to figures released by the Massachusetts Gaming Commission Monday. But after completing its first year in business, the casino has fallen well below projections.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Attorney General wants to know more about one tech giant’s outsize influence in the digital marketplace. William Tong is one of 50 attorneys general who have launched an anti-trust investigation into Google. 

Updated at 5:18 p.m. ET

President Trump on Friday announced higher tariffs on goods from China, hours after Beijing said it will slap tariffs on $75 billion of autos and other U.S. goods. Earlier in the day, he "ordered" U.S. companies to stop doing business with China though it was unclear whether he had the power to do that.

As the casino in Springfield, Massachusetts, was under construction a few years ago, several local retailers and restaurants said they got a lot of new business. But now — a year after it opened — not so much.

Updated at 9:31 a.m. ET

The economy is slowing down, but it keeps creating jobs at a healthy pace. Employers added 164,000 jobs last month, as the unemployment rate held steady at 3.7%, the Labor Department said Friday. The jobless rate remains at a nearly 50-year low.

Analysts had expected about 165,000 jobs to be added in July and the unemployment rate to be 3.6%.

Courtesy: MMCT

The state’s two federally recognized tribes, along with several state lawmakers, have put forward a new proposal to expand gaming in the state.

A proposed bill would authorize the Mohegans and Mashantucket Pequots to build a resort casino in Bridgeport, and potentially build out three more casinos or entertainment zones in Hartford and other towns around the state. 

Prosecutors said a former slot machine technician stole roughly $22,000 from the MGM Springfield casino.

A woman has been charged in connection with a hacking breach at Capital One bank that exposed information from more than 100 million credit applications over a 14-year period – what is thought to be one of the largest such attacks in recent years.

Authorities in Seattle have charged Paige A. Thompson, who also goes by the handle "erratic," with a single count of computer fraud. She appeared in court on Monday and is scheduled for a detention hearing on Thursday.

The state of California has formed a deal with four automakers to produce fuel-efficient cars. The agreement is different from plans the Trump administration is expected to put in place that would relax national emissions standards.

Four of the world's largest automakers, including Ford, BMW, Honda and Volkswagen, signed the deal with the California Air Resources Board.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Hemp production. It's a growing field in Connecticut... and we mean that in the most literal sense. This hour, we learn about the state's newly seeded hemp industry and consider the challenges and opportunities of farming the plant on local land. 

Updated at 11:25 a.m. ET

Equifax will pay up to $700 million in fines and monetary relief to consumers over a 2017 data breach at the credit reporting bureau that affected nearly 150 million people.

Updated at 7:34 p.m. ET

Stocks rallied Wednesday as Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testified about challenges facing the U.S. economy, adding to expectations that the central bank will cut interest rates later this month.

The Fed had hinted at such a cut in June.

Updated at 9:25 a.m. ET

Hiring rebounded strongly in June as U.S. employers added 224,000 jobs. That's well above the pace many forecasters were expecting, and a sharp pickup after a disappointing May.

A monthly snapshot from the Labor Department showed unemployment rose slightly, to 3.7%, as more workers entered the job market.

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A workers' rights activist says about a dozen current and former employees of Northampton, Massachusetts, music venues are planning to take legal action over wage theft.

Jeffrey Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

This hour, we take a deep dive into the realities of modern-day motherhood. We talk with a sociologist who spent years in the field interviewing working moms. We also get a local perspective, and we want to hear from you. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has found a new problem in Boeing's troubled 737 Max that the company must address before the regulatory agency will allow the airplanes to fly passengers again. The discovery further delays the airliner's return to service.

Southwest, American and United Airlines, the three U.S. carriers that fly Max jets, have already pulled the aircraft from their schedules through Labor Day weekend and this latest development could set back the plane's return to commercial flight well into the fall.

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