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In the tiny town of Laurierville, deep in the heart of Quebec, sits a former furniture warehouse that has been converted to hold half the world's reserve supply of maple syrup. This strategic reserve is designed to stabilize the price and supply of maple syrup for a growing global market, and all commercial maple producers in Quebec are required to deliver part of their crop to the reserve each year.

Jews preparing their Passover meals this weekend may face an ethical dilemma if they plan on getting their food from Stop & Shop. Employees at the grocery store chain are on strike. One Connecticut rabbi says food isn’t kosher if you have to cross a picket line to buy it.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Grocery chain Stop & Shop said on Friday, April 12 that a majority of its Connecticut stores are still open even though union workers have gone on strike.

Updated at 12:41 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is preparing to slap tariffs on billions of dollars' worth of imports from Europe, in retaliation for what it calls unfair subsidies of Airbus jets. The proposed tariffs would cover not only aircraft but also wine, cheese, woolen suits and other signature European products.

Fighting to retain its Boston-area casino license, Wynn Resorts executives on Wednesday detailed changes in the company's governance and policies, adjustments made in the wake of a litany of sexual misconduct allegations against former founder and CEO Steve Wynn.

Stop & Shop returns to the negotiating table with its unions on Wednesday. The state treasurer of Massachusetts has criticized the company's proposals — and she has a unique perspective. 

Wynn Resorts mishandled sexual misconduct allegations against founder Steve Wynn, then concealed the accusations from Massachusetts regulators when seeking one of the state’s coveted casino licenses, according to a report by investigators for the Massachusetts Gaming Commission.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state Senate voted Wednesday to confirm Gov. Ned Lamont's controversial choice to run the Department of Economic and Community Development. David Lehman's nomination has been criticized by lawmakers of both parties, mostly because of his previous job at the investment banking firm Goldman Sachs and its role in the 2008 financial crisis. 

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

Have you taken a ride on the bright red Hartford Line? The commuter rail service debuted last summer, a recent project of the Connecticut Department of Transportation.

But rail is just one mode of transportation in a state known for congestion and aging infrastructure.

This hour, we sit down with new DOT Commissioner Joseph Giulietti. Giulietti is a Connecticut native, who most recently served as President of Metro North.

Jeffrey Smith / Creative Commons

Listen live on Monday at 9:00 am.

job while also raising a family.

This hour, we take a deep dive into the realities of modern-day motherhood. We talk with a sociologist who spent years in the field interviewing working moms. We also get a local perspective, and we want to hear from you. 

Trump Administration Reconsiders, OK's Casino In East Windsor

Mar 21, 2019
Rendering of the Tribal Winds Casino planned for East Windsor, Connecticut.
Tribal Winds Casino

Facing a criminal investigation about political interference, the Department of Interior abruptly reversed course Thursday and announced it has accepted a gambling amendment necessary for the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes to jointly construct a casino in East Windsor to compete with MGM Springfield.

U.S. Census Bureau

New England has long been one of the biggest makers of guns sold both inside, and outside, the U.S. Iconic names like Smith & Wesson, the Colt 45 and the Winchester rifle were all made here, and the region still has several global manufacturers of guns.

Package Stores Offer Dime Recycling Fee In Lieu Of Liquor Bottle Deposits

Mar 18, 2019
Jeff Kubina (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s package stores have proposed a 10-cent “recycling fee” as a compromise alternative to the 25-cent deposit Gov. Ned Lamont recommended last month.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The city of Hartford is going back to a familiar strategy with the hope that local businesses can capitalize on March Madness.

Beginning March 21, the NCAA Tournament returns to Hartford for the first time since 1998.

Updated at 5:48 p.m. ET

The Federal Aviation Administration says it is temporarily grounding all Boeing 737 Max aircraft operated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory.

The announcement Wednesday afternoon follows decisions by many other countries to ground the planes after 157 people died in Sunday's crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8.

Grendelkhan / Wikimedia Commons

What would you do with all that time if you didn't have to drive during your daily commute?

This hour: like it or not, autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be a major part of our not-too-distant transportation future. We take a look at some of the promises and challenges of automating vehicles and ask what they will mean for the cities of our future.

MGM Springfield is trying to figure out how to keep people under 21 from getting onto its casino floor. 

Chinese telecom manufacturer Huawei is suing the U.S. government, arguing that Congress violated the Constitution when it banned government agencies from purchasing Huawei equipment.

Katie Harp / Pexels

Do you have credit card debt hanging over your head? Or maybe you've been thinking you should start saving for retirement, but you aren’t sure how to pay for it?

This hour we sit down with NPR correspondent Chris Arnold, who covers personal finance and consumer protection. NPR’s new family of podcasts, Life Kit, gives listeners practical tips for navigating life challenges from parenting to healthy eating. Arnold hosts Life Kit’s podcasts about money. They are all about figuring out how to get your finances in order in a fun and approachable way.

Lamont's 'Debt Diet' Hits An Already Lean Nonprofit Safety Net

Mar 4, 2019
Gov. Ned Lamont delivered his first budget address to the legislature on February 20, 2019.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s private, nonprofit social services community has been struggling since the early 2000s with minimal growth in state funding for the vast array of programs it provides.

Updated at 11:33 a.m. ET

The U.S. economy expanded at a solid 2.6 percent rate during the last three months of 2018, but growth was significantly lower than it had been earlier in the year, the government said Thursday.

For 2018 as a whole, the economy grew 2.9 percent, a touch below the Trump administration's projected target of 3 percent.

Image of twenty dollar bills
Martin Vorel / Libreshot

Progressive lawmakers around the country have been rallying behind a call for a $15 minimum wage, and Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont has joined their ranks.

This hour, what would increasing the minimum wage by almost 150 percent over the next four years mean for businesses and workers here in Connecticut? We hear from an economist and get the takes of several local business owners on Democrats’ proposal to increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2023.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Ned Lamont's proposed budget doesn’t include a plan to increase the state income tax to help cover a $3.7 billion projected budget deficit, and that has some watchers and stakeholders wondering about the state of income inequality in Connecticut.

For 27 years, Mark Schand lay in his prison cot in Massachusetts and plotted out the retail empire he'd been envisioning since well before his arrest.

"I would lay in bed, my eyes wide open, looking at the ceiling, just thinking of a color scheme, and picture the uniform," said Schand.

Members of the Hartford Courant newsroom are moving to form a union, NPR has learned. It's the latest Tribune Publishing newspaper where journalists have been pushing to organize.

Domenic Esposito

Massachusetts’ Attorney General, Maura Healey, has filed a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma and the Sackler Family, claiming that “Purdue pharma created the [opioid] epidemic and profited from it through a web of illegal deceit.”

Updated at 9:27 a.m. ET

Job growth picked up for the 100th consecutive month in January even as hundreds of thousands of federal workers were furloughed during the partial government shutdown, the Labor Department said Friday.

Employers added 304,000 jobs last month — topping analysts' expectations and the 223,000 average monthly gain in 2018. The string of job growth underscores the long economic expansion since the Great Recession.

Excitement over the Super Bowl continues to mount here in New England, as the Patriots are set to battle the Los Angeles Rams on Sunday night.

While playing in the Super Bowl is nothing new for the Pats, the ability for fans to place a legal wager on the game here in the region is new.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled last year that a federal ban on sports betting was unconstitutional.

And in New England — so far — sports betting is legal at a pair of casinos in Rhode Island: Twin River, in Lincoln; and Tiverton, just over the Massachusetts state line from Fall River.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

The partial shutdown of the government reduced federal spending by about $3 billion and cut into overall U.S. economic growth, according to a report released Monday by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

The report says that because of the shutdown, which lasted from Dec. 22 through last Friday, about $18 billion in discretionary government spending was delayed. Most of the money will be spent later, now that the shutdown has ended.

This Valentine's Day is going to be a little less sweet.

SweetHearts, the colorful, heart-shaped candies with sugary messages like "Kiss Me" and "My Love" will be scarce this year. If you're lucky enough to find them, they'll be from last year's batch.

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