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animals

Aequorea victoria
Sierra Blakely / Wikimedia Commons

Did you know 75 percent of animals in the ocean glow?

Sandy Cole / Wikimedia

The Argus Pheasant is a lifelong bachelor. He mates with multiple females but has no further contact with his mates or the baby pheasants he sires. By human terms, not much of a feminist.

David Tipling / Yale University Press

Yes we’ve gotten a few inches of snow already, but winter officially starts next week.

For animals, preparing for the season means undertaking major lifestyle changes in order to survive.

Bradley International Airport is giving stressed travelers the chance to hug a therapy dog during the holiday season.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

At twilight in late fall, thousands of crows take wing above highways running through Hartford. These crow “commuters” are headed home to roost, but where, exactly, do they go?

Kevin the turkey hangs out beside the road near the DMV in Old Wethersfield.
David DesRoches / WNPR

Take a drive through Old Wethersfield and he's hard to miss.

John Morgan / Creative Commons

The House of Representatives passed a 440-page tax bill Thursday that was introduced two short weeks ago. Among other things, the bill would remove deductions  important to people with big medical expenses and college tuitions and ultimately hit hardest those making $75,000 or less. 

Tanel Teemusk / flickr creative commons

It's been a crazy week. (Of course, they're all crazy weeks.) As such, this week's crazy Nose tries to rapid-fire its way through as many crazy topics as possible in its crazy 49 minutes.

Some of the crazy possibilities:

Zhao / flickr

There are an estimated 10 quintillion insects living on the planet right now-- That's 1.4 billion insects for each human. If they decided to take over, there's nothing we could do to stop them. Fortunately, they seem relatively content to share their planet with us.

C Watts / flickr creative commons

In 1959, Soviet geneticist Dmitri Belyaev started an ambitious experiment to study the origins of domestication -- he would attempt to breed domesticated wild foxes by selecting on their behavior alone, a process he imagined our ancestors carried out with dogs thousands of years before.

Lori Mack/WNPR

The East Haven police department has acquired a new piece of equipment to protect one of its most valued employees. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Long Island Sound has a new guardian of sorts. Earlier this year, biologist Bill Lucey was named soundkeeper of the Northeast estuary.

This hour, the Connecticut native stops by our studios.

We learn more about his role and talk about efforts to improve life in and around the Sound.

During a July morning at the New England Aquarium Animal Care Center in Quincy, Massachusetts, a clinical volunteer checked the heart rate of a Kemp's Ridley sea turtle with a Doppler instrument as a part of its physical exam.   

David Tipling / Yale University Press

The days have gotten shorter and the leaves continue to change -- all signs autumn is definitely here. But for animals, the beginning of fall means undertaking major lifestyle changes -- in order to survive the winter.

Wikimedia Commons

Is extinction forever? A Yale researcher is asking that question as she works to revive a type of giant tortoise that used to be found in the Galapagos.

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