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Nobody likes termites. They get into the wood in our homes and can lead to infuriating and expensive repairs. What's to like?

It turns out, there's a lot to like termites. Scientists study how they build their mounds for clues to solving some of the world's most pressing problems, like mitigating the effects of drought, building colonies on Mars, and creating biofuels.

Trinity College

Ugandan-American musician Samite Mulondo combines music and storytelling in his performances. This hour, Samite returns to our studios to talk about his newest piece, The Story Of Mutoto, which he performs at the University of Saint Joseph this weekend.

And  Hartford’s art house theater Cinestudio celebrates fifty years of showing films this week. We talk with Cinestudio’s founders, James Hanley and Peter McMorris.

Ballake Sissoko kora instrument
B. Peverelli

Sherif Sissoko says it would have been one thing if his brother Ballaké’s car had been vandalized. But his musical instrument?

“He was traveling to India, to Israel, to China with this kora,” said Sissoko, who lives in Hartford and is also a musician. “It’s personal. It’s like a piece of yourself.”

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Once a year, about 50 alumni of the University of Liberia Chorus come together to make music, reminisce, and raise money for the university’s music department. This year's performance is this weekend in New Haven.

Brian Skerry / SHARK

Sharks. They’re among the apex predators of the ocean, swimming with stealth and agility across our blue planet. But more than that, they’re sources of myth and fear, stirring imaginations with their serrated jaws and cutting dorsal fins.

Updated at noon ET

A military council has taken control of Sudan and arrested its longtime president, Omar al-Bashir, the country's military said Thursday. The move comes after opposition protesters recently gained new momentum in demanding al-Bashir leave office.

Sudan's defense minister, Awad Mohamed Ahmed Ibn Auf, said the "regime" had been removed and its head arrested, as he announced the coup in a televised statement.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A new education bill seeks to add African-American studies to the social studies curriculum in Connecticut public schools. High school students testifying before the legislature this week said loud and clear that Black history is more than just Rosa Parks, slavery and civil rights.

David Siu / Creative Commons

Nobody likes termites. They get into the wood in our homes and can lead to infuriating and expensive repairs. What's to like?

It turns out, there's a lot to like termites. Scientists study how they build their mounds for clues to solving some of the world's most pressing problems, like mitigating the effects of drought, building colonies on Mars, and creating biofuels.

Samite playing flute
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Samite Mulondo went from a refugee camp in Kenya to collaborating with Paul Simon. This year, the musician and Uganda native joined us in the studio to share his story and his music.

David Siu / Creative Commons

Nobody likes termites. They get into the wood in our homes and can lead to infuriating and expensive repairs. What's to like?

It turns out, there's a lot to like termites. Scientists study how they build their mounds for clues to solving some of the world's most pressing problems, like mitigating the effects of drought, building colonies on Mars, and creating biofuels.

Courtesy of the artist.

The International Festival of Arts and Ideas in New Haven hosts the premiere of a play called Requiem for an Electric Chair. It’s written and performed by Congolese actor Toto Kisaku who was granted asylum in the U.S. earlier this year. He lives now in Connecticut.

Elizabeth Nearing / Long Wharf Theater

A new play at New Haven's Long Wharf Theatre integrates the stories of real refugees trying to make a new life for themselves in the Elm City.

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A Nigerian musician, who regularly performs for young prison inmates in his native country, will make his American debut early next month in Connecticut.

Samite playing flute
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Samite Mulondo went from a refugee camp in Kenya to collaborating with Paul Simon. This hour, the musician and Uganda native joins us to share his story and his music.

Lilia Blaise

Tunisia was the catalyst for the Arab Spring seven years ago. After historic municipal elections in this North African country, we ask—why has Tunisia succeeded in achieving democracy when others have failed?

Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

President Trump is meeting with his Nigerian counterpart, Muhammadu Buhari, today at the White House. The two leaders are discussing security and economic issues. They're also holding a press conference featuring two questions from American news outlets and two questions from Nigerian media. Watch the event live.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Walt Disney’s hit film "Black Panther" broke new ground as the first mainstream superhero movie with a predominantly black cast and plenty of strong leading women. The film’s music also opens new doors: introducing authentic African sounds into an action-packed Marvel movie score. Central to those sounds is the talking drum from West Africa which can be heard sailing above many of the orchestral and choral arrangements.

Samite playing flute
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Samite Mulondo went from a refugee camp in Kenya to collaborating with Paul Simon. This hour, the musician and Uganda native joins us in the studio to share his story and his music.

Voodoo Unveiled

Mar 6, 2018
David Rosen / flickr

Voodoo is more than just a misunderstood religion, its practice draws on age-old beliefs, cultural elements, and folk traditions from a multitude of nations and ethnic groups.

Former international soccer star George Weah has won Liberia's presidential runoff, the country's election commission announced Thursday.

Weah won 61.5 percent of the vote, with more than 98 percent of ballots counted. He defeated the current vice president, Joseph Boakai.

Voodoo Unveiled

Nov 29, 2017
David Rosen / flickr

Voodoo is more than just a misunderstood religion, its practice draws on age-old beliefs, cultural elements, and folk traditions from a multitude of nations and ethnic groups.

Tanel Teemusk / flickr creative commons

It's been a crazy week. (Of course, they're all crazy weeks.) As such, this week's crazy Nose tries to rapid-fire its way through as many crazy topics as possible in its crazy 49 minutes.

Some of the crazy possibilities:

Updated at 6:05 a.m. ET Wednesday

Zimbabwe's army said Wednesday that it has seized control in what is being described as "a bloodless transition" that has apparently pushed aside President Robert Mugabe. The military said he and his family are "safe and sound."

Armored vehicles and soldiers patrolled streets in the capital, Harare, amid loud explosions overnight. Soldiers reportedly took control of the headquarters of the national broadcaster, ZBC, and an army spokesman said on air: "This is not a military takeover."

Chion Wolf

The ensemble Cuatro Puntos sees music as a catalyst for change. The group, which is based in Connecticut, performs and teaches around the world. The ensemble often collaborates with members of local communities during performances.

Updated 6:20 a.m. ET Monday

In the Somali capital of Mogadishu, funerals have begun for those killed in Saturday's truck bombing. Officials have cautioned that the death would continue to rise from the nation's worst-ever attack.

The government's latest figures show more than 300 people were killed and another 300 others wounded in the explosion. The Associated Press reports that overwhelmed hospitals in Mogadishu are struggling to assist other badly wounded victims, many burned beyond recognition.

Fronteiras do Pensamento https://www.flickr.com/photos/fronteirasweb / Creative Commons

Nobel Peace Prize 2011 winner Leymah Gbowee made a passionate plea on Thursday to those who work in conflict zones around the world to include women as equal partners in the journey toward peace.

Who Owns Antiquity?

Jul 20, 2017
Alan / flickr creative commons

Hobby Lobby recently paid a $3 million fee for illegally buying smuggled ancient Iraqi artifacts.

This hour: What is the relationship between collecting antiquities and the looting of them in countries that are experiencing violent conflicts and societal breakdown? Do Western museums and collections have a role to play in saving at-risk antiquities?

Why I Love (And Question) Independence Day

Jul 3, 2017

On my first Fourth of July in the United States, I woke up in the morning, stretched and realized that my wife was still in bed.

I asked if she was going to work. She said, "Oh, don't you know today is July Fourth?"

I looked through our window. Just about everybody in Fernley, Nevada, the town where we lived, was on their way to Main Street with chairs, umbrellas, drinks and snacks.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

This hour: bridging West Africa’s communication gap. We hear how one Connecticut-based nonprofit is bringing community radio to Senegalese villages. It's something host Lucy Nalpathanchil reported on during her visit to the country late last month. 

Nine months ago, Joyce Chance left a refugee camp in Uganda where she had spent the last eleven years. Chance, who was born in Congo, boarded a plane with her two kids, and came to the United States.

A refugee resettlement agency in Concord, New Hampshire picked them up at the airport, and moved them into a one-room apartment.

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