2020 election | Connecticut Public Radio
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2020 election

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This November, 32 million Latinos will be eligible to vote in the 2020 election, making them the largest minority voting bloc in the United States, according to the Pew Research Center. But Latinos are a diverse electorate—with roots from more than two dozen countries. 

This hour, what are President Trump and the Democrats doing right now to reach these voters?

The Democratic presidential primary candidates are competing in South Carolina on Saturday, hoping to win over voters in the fourth contest of 2020. Follow NPR's live coverage of the primary, including results and analysis.

Jesse 1974 / Flickr

Secession is in the air. Britain withdrew from the European Union, Scotland wants out of the U.K., Catalonia from Spain, and, wait for it, California from the U.S. Yes, the days of our country's states being united may soon come to an end.

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

Bernie Sanders won a decisive victory in last week's Nevada caucuses after effectively tying with Pete Buttigieg in the less diverse states of Iowa and New Hampshire. Is he the candidate that can beat President Trump? Or the one who will lead the Democratic Party down the road to ruin? It depends on who you talk to. 

The Democratic presidential primary is heading west for the third contest in the 2020 race. Nevada Democrats are hoping their caucuses avoid similar problems that plagued Iowa earlier this month.

Follow NPR's coverage for the latest updates, analysis and results as the caucuses get underway.

Updated at 7:08 a.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has opened up a double-digit lead in the Democratic nominating contest, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Sanders has 31% support nationally, up 9 points since December, the last time the poll asked about Democratic voters' preferences.

Over GOP Leader’s Objections, Trump Faces Primary In Connecticut

Feb 15, 2020
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s secretary of the state said Friday that Republicans will have a choice of at least three candidates in a presidential primary on April 28, but the party’s state chairman asserted that the GOP doesn’t want one and might go to court to stop it.

President Donald J. Trump, who won 85.6% of the vote in the New Hampshire primary this week, will be contested in Connecticut by William Weld, the former governor of Massachusetts, and a former Democratic presidential candidate, Rocky De La Fuente.

John Dankosky / Connecticut Public

The Democratic primary season is just getting started. How have the results from the New Hampshire primary affected how you might vote? 

Updated at 10:20 a.m ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders pulled off a narrow victory in New Hampshire on Tuesday night, providing a jolt of energy to his front-of-the-pack status by holding off Pete Buttigieg, former mayor of South Bend, Ind.

Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET

The finish at the top in New Hampshire looked a lot like the finish last week in Iowa, this time with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders leading the way and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg finishing a close second.

But from the No. 3 spot on down there were some pretty big surprises, including the rise of Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar and disappointing finishes for Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden.

Here are six takeaways from what happened last night:

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio / NENC

As New Hampshire voters pick their party's nominees, the NPR news team is providing live updates from the Granite State.

Families with children watch from the second floor as Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks at the Manchester Canvass Kickoff with Elizabeth Warren at Manchester Community College on Feb. 8, 2020 in New Hampshire.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

The Democratic presidential candidates criss-crossed New Hampshire for a final push ahead of the Tuesday primary. Rallies were held from Concord to Manchester to Londonderry, where supporters waited in long lines to fill halls, gyms, arenas and schools to catch glimpses of -- or shake hands with -- the candidates.  Here are some of the moments that show what it was like on the ground in the Granite State.

Updated at 12:49 p.m. ET

Democrats are going to try again.

After the Iowa results meltdown, New Hampshire takes center stage Tuesday night. This election is run by the secretary of state's office and not the state party. It's also a more-straightforward primary (with a couple kinks we explain below) rather than a complicated, math-heavy caucus.

Unclimatechange / Creative Commons

The Atlantic writer McKay Coppins says President Trump's reelection team is waging a massive disinformation campaign that uses the same tactics of information warfare used by autocrats like Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and by Russian President Vladimir Putin in our 2016 election.

Voting booth
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Presidential hopefuls have been flooding New Hampshire’s airwaves with ad buys ahead of Tuesday’s primaries. The Wesleyan Media Project in Middletown tracks political advertising in real time during elections. 

Co-director Erika Franklin Fowler spoke with Connecticut Public Radio’s Diane Orson for Morning Edition.

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Seven Democratic presidential candidates are debating in New Hampshire Friday night, days after a major issue left the first contest of 2020 too close to call.

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We're back on the air -- at least for today -- and we're taking your calls. Give us a call at 888-720-9677 (888-720-WNPR). It's been a dizzying week between the Super Bowl and impeachment and now...

The Iowa caucuses descended into chaos Monday night after we all learned that results would be delayed until later on Tuesday. Problems with a new app led to frustration, mistrust, and renewed questions over whether Iowa should remain first in the nation. Does the caucus system even work? Why don't we just hold a national primary?

Unfortunately, candidates got lost under the pile of problems. Each claimed either victory or a very good showing in a caucus in which many Democrats remained undecided until the end. Is Michael Bloomberg the winner in this mess?

Updated at 9:40 a.m. ET Tuesday

The Iowa caucuses aren't over yet. A delay in the results meant the state Democratic Party did not call the race Monday night as expected, leaving the candidates and their supporters in limbo.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Leading Democratic presidential candidates meet once again on the debate stage this week.  The stakes are higher than ever for presidential hopefuls, because the first primaries are just around the corner. This hour, we check in with New Hampshire where voters will head to the polls in less than a month.

Is there a better way to narrow candidates for President than the state-by-state primary system? 

And later, a high-profile murder case in Connecticut has led to a proposal to reform the way domestic violence cases are treated in family courts.

Angela Hsieh/NPR

Seven Democratic presidential candidates are debating Thursday night, the smallest group yet. The December debate, hosted by Politico and PBS NewsHour, is taking place at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. NPR reporters are providing live analysis of the candidates' remarks.

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The top seven Democratic presidential candidates will appear on stage in Los Angeles Thursday night in the sixth debate of the year.

The debate comes just one day after President Trump became the third president of the United States to be impeached by the House of Representatives.

Here's what you need to know:

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders lead the crowded Democratic field, pulling in together about half of the support of Democratic voters and Democratic-leaning independents, according to the latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll.

Biden leads with 24%, followed closely by Sanders at 22%. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren is third with 17%, followed by South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg at 13%, all together making up a clear top tier of four candidates.

Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and former Vice President Joe Biden are leading the crowded Democratic presidential primary race in New Hampshire, according to a new WBUR poll. With the first-in-the-nation primary less than nine weeks away, Buttigieg is running slightly ahead of Biden, followed by Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who is in fourth place.

Throughout the presidential primary campaign, voters in New Hampshire have said climate change is one of their top priorities. And even as candidates emphasize the dangers of global warming – and detail their plans to address it – many voters aren't reassured.

NHPR’s Annie Ropeik has more as part of our series “Where They Stand,” which takes a closer look at candidates’ policy proposals. 

Editor's note, Feb. 4, 2020: Click here to see an updated version of this project with the Democratic field as of the final week of the New Hampshire primary. 

Crandall “CJ” Yopp

Dr. Khalilah Brown-Dean is a Quinnipiac University professor and author of Identity Politics in the United States. 

Earlier this month, she sat down with us in front of a live audience to talk about the book, which paints identity politics -- a term often associated with modern-day elections -- in a new, historical light.

This hour, we listen back to our conversation, and we also hear from you. 

From Toxic To Staple: Gun Control Is Now Front And Center On The Campaign Trail

Oct 23, 2019
Gun control advocate and school shooting survivor David Hogg speaks at a presidential candidate gun forum on Oct. 2, 2019, with former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, far left, looking on.
Heath Druzin / Boise State Public Radio

The politics of guns on the national stage are changing. Fast. And when Democratic presidential hopefuls got together in Las Vegas earlier this month to discuss gun policy the shift was crystal clear.

Instead of running away from the issues, as the Democratic Party has for years, many of the candidates tried to one up each other on their gun control cred.

Scazon / Creative Commons

Today, a two-part show. The first part is with an impeachment expert on the House inquiry into whether President Trump abused his power for personal gain. How much trouble is the president in?

'Mayor Pete' Continues To Lead In Campaign Fundraising In Connecticut

Oct 20, 2019
Mayor Pete Buttigieg held a town hall meeting for his presidential campaign on the front lawn of Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa.
Phil Roeder (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Pete Buttigieg continues to raise more money in Connecticut than any other presidential candidate, according to the latest filings with the Federal Elections Commission.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Last night’s 12-person Democratic presidential debate proved a few things:

1. That’s too many people on stage.
2. Elizabeth Warren has become both the front-runner and the target of most of her colleagues.
3. Warren is proving to be a bit harder to attack than former front-runner, Joe Biden.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Creative Commons

President Trump leaves chaos in his wake.

There is chaos in Syria. Turkish artillery fire is targeting the Kurdish-led militia that has been allied with U.S. Special Forces over the last five years in their war against ISIS. Syrians are fleeing their homes, ISIS prisoners are escaping from prisons no longer guarded by the Kurds, and the last U.S. troops pulled out on Sunday.

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