2020 election | Connecticut Public Radio
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2020 election

Updated at 7:38 p.m. ET

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his newly named running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris of California, made their first joint appearance Wednesday following Biden's announcement of the selection a day earlier.

Henry Boulton, capacity monitor at a poll at Conard High School in West Hartford, gives an instruction to Elizabeth Davis who voted for the first time on Tuesday,
YEHYUN KIM / CTMirror.org

The top-line races were easy. Soon after the polls closed Tuesday night, the Associated Press declared Republican Donald J. Trump and Democrat Joe Biden winners of the year’s final presidential nomination contest, the twice-delayed Connecticut primary.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

With a presidential primary just a week away, municipal clerks are feeling the stress of absentee voting amid the pandemic. 

Socially Distanced Senate Passes No-Excuse Absentee Ballot Bill

Jul 28, 2020
Sen. Will Haskell, D-Westport, argued that minimizing crowds at the polls by allowing people to vote by absentee ballot contributes to public safety.
YEHYUN KIM / CTMirror.org

Meeting for the first time since COVID-19 forced the closure of the State Capitol in March, the Connecticut Senate voted 35-1 Tuesday for final passage of legislation allowing no-excuse absentee ballot voting as a public health precaution in November.

Colin Gillette, Bradford County, PA

The number of people testing positive for coronavirus continues to rise in many parts of the U.S., with sharp rises in places like Florida, Nevada, Alabama, Texas, and Puerto Rico. Yet, President Trump continues to attribute the rise to more testing -- despite the rise in hospitalizations and deaths -- and he wants to reduce federal aid for more testing, tracing, and for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Also this hour: The ABC News/Washington Post poll released Sunday shows former Vice President Joe Biden leading President Trump by 15 points among registered voters, 55% to 40%. A majority of respondents are not happy with the president's handling of the coronavirus, among other things.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

The number of people being infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus is rising in 48 states. We're testing more, but the rate of positive tests, hospitalizations, and in some states, deaths, is also rising.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The novel coronavirus could make it difficult to staff polling places for elections this August and November. To guard against that, Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill has announced a campaign to recruit workers for this year’s primary and general elections. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Something different is happening in America at this moment. Do you feel it? We want to hear from you. Call us during our live show Tuesday, from 1 to 2 p.m., at 888-720-9677 or 888-720-WNPR.

People across America are protesting the same police brutality against black Americans that never seems to stop.

America has suffered more deaths from COVID-19 than any other nation, and we still don't have a federal plan to deal with it, despite the efforts of health care workers and scientists.

President Trump had threatened to deploy the military if the state officials he first felt the need to denigrate couldn't control the looting in their locales. He proceeded to order the police to use tear gas and flash grenades to disperse peaceful protesters so that he could pose in front of a burned church with a Bible in his hand.

COVID-19 Deaths Hit 3,000, Connecticut Prepares To Reopen, And Gun Rights Group Files Suit

May 11, 2020

As Connecticut continues to focus on reopening its economy, this state’s coronavirus death toll reached a grim milestone Monday. State officials reported that 3,008 people here have now succumbed to this deadly disease.

Absentee Ballot
Airman 1st Class Zoe Thacker / U.S. Air Force

Stamford, Connecticut currently has the most residents diagnosed with coronavirus in the state. This hour, Mayor David Martin joins us to discuss the city’s recovery plan. 

postcards
Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

As recent events in Wisconsin have reminded us, this is an important year for elections, but one where we will have to explore new paradigms for political activity.

Before the coronavirus pandemic hit and we all began social distancing, election activities had been ramping up. And one cooperative effort in Connecticut is managing to keep going stronger than ever, despite physical isolation.

CTMirror.org

Reshaped by a virus, the strangest race for the White House in U.S. history kicked off in practice if not officially when Sen. Bernie Sanders ended his campaign and endorsed former Democratic rival Joe Biden in his challenge of President Donald Trump.

Bernie Sanders
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders has dropped out of the running for the Democratic presidential nomination, but his decision Wednesday to remain on the ballot could force Connecticut to nevertheless hold a primary under the threat of COVID-19.

Updated at 1:43 p.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is planning to stay in the 2020 Democratic presidential race despite another disappointing primary night.

Two weeks ago, Sanders was the unlikely front-runner for the nomination. Now former Vice President Joe Biden has consolidated support so rapidly, and won so many states, that Sanders is facing calls to drop out of the race.

But Sanders announced his intention to press on in a statement on Wednesday.

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the 2020 McIntyre-Shaheen 100 Club dinner.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

It was another big night for Joe Biden. The former vice president won a set of resounding victories over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders Tuesday, most notably in Michigan, which Sanders won four years ago.

In the second biggest Democratic primary night next to Super Tuesday, March 10 has six contests. Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and Washington state are choosing Democratic presidential nominees.

Follow NPR's live coverage, including results and analysis.

America Amplified: Post-Super Tuesday Special

Mar 5, 2020

It happens every four years: the national media swoop into Super Tuesday states, cover the horse race, and move on — leaving behind voters with a lot left to say about the issues that matter most in their lives. But the conversation doesn't have to end there.

Updated at 10:58 a.m. ET

Mike Bloomberg, the billionaire former mayor of New York City who had spent hundreds of millions of dollars on ads during a 100-day presidential campaign, announced on Wednesday he's suspending his bid and is endorsing former Vice President Joe Biden.

"Three months ago, I entered the race for President to defeat Donald Trump," Bloomberg said in a statement. "Today, I am leaving the race for the same reason: to defeat Donald Trump — because it is clear to me that staying in would make achieving that goal more difficult."

The Democratic presidential contest is now a two-man race.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders went into Super Tuesday the front-runner, but it was Joe Biden's night. The former vice president rode a surge of momentum out of his big win in South Carolina on Saturday and established himself squarely as the principal alternative to Sanders.

On the day of the Democratic presidential debate in South Carolina, Kyle Bryant, who’s serving time at the medium-security prison in Norfolk, was trying to get fellow inmates to tune in. But it was a struggle.

“[People in prison] believe all politicians lie,” he said. “And that [politicians] all make fake promises.”

Debate-watching is just one way Bryant is trying to get other inmates at MCI-Norfolk to think about voting.

Tuesday is the biggest primary day of the 2020 race, when 14 states are holding contests with 1,357 delegates at stake. Follow NPR's coverage for the latest news, analysis and results.

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

Sanders won big in Nevada. Biden won big in South Carolina. Steyer and Buttigieg are out, Bloomberg is in, and Warren and Klobuchar are pulling up the rear.

There will be 1,357 delegates from 14 states up for grabs on Super Tuesday. We try to make sense of it.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This November, 32 million Latinos will be eligible to vote in the 2020 election, making them the largest minority voting bloc in the United States, according to the Pew Research Center. But Latinos are a diverse electorate—with roots from more than two dozen countries. 

This hour, what are President Trump and the Democrats doing right now to reach these voters?

The Democratic presidential primary candidates are competing in South Carolina on Saturday, hoping to win over voters in the fourth contest of 2020. Follow NPR's live coverage of the primary, including results and analysis.

Jesse 1974 / Flickr

Secession is in the air. Britain withdrew from the European Union, Scotland wants out of the U.K., Catalonia from Spain, and, wait for it, California from the U.S. Yes, the days of our country's states being united may soon come to an end.

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

Bernie Sanders won a decisive victory in last week's Nevada caucuses after effectively tying with Pete Buttigieg in the less diverse states of Iowa and New Hampshire. Is he the candidate that can beat President Trump? Or the one who will lead the Democratic Party down the road to ruin? It depends on who you talk to. 

The Democratic presidential primary is heading west for the third contest in the 2020 race. Nevada Democrats are hoping their caucuses avoid similar problems that plagued Iowa earlier this month.

Follow NPR's coverage for the latest updates, analysis and results as the caucuses get underway.

Updated at 7:08 a.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has opened up a double-digit lead in the Democratic nominating contest, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Sanders has 31% support nationally, up 9 points since December, the last time the poll asked about Democratic voters' preferences.

Over GOP Leader’s Objections, Trump Faces Primary In Connecticut

Feb 15, 2020
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s secretary of the state said Friday that Republicans will have a choice of at least three candidates in a presidential primary on April 28, but the party’s state chairman asserted that the GOP doesn’t want one and might go to court to stop it.

President Donald J. Trump, who won 85.6% of the vote in the New Hampshire primary this week, will be contested in Connecticut by William Weld, the former governor of Massachusetts, and a former Democratic presidential candidate, Rocky De La Fuente.

John Dankosky / Connecticut Public

The Democratic primary season is just getting started. How have the results from the New Hampshire primary affected how you might vote? 

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