2018 elections | Connecticut Public Radio
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2018 elections

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Just days after the U.S. Attorney General released his summary of the long-anticipated Mueller report, we ask: What does his sum-up do -- or not do -- to trust in the country's election system? We talk with a panel of reporters and election experts, and we also hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The fate of a contested election in Stratford will be decided the state House of Representatives. But the House will have to consider two conflicting resolutions by the legislature's Committee on Contested Elections. 

In Personal Spending, Lamont Crushed Stefanowski

Jan 11, 2019
Ned Lamont and Bob Stefanowski during a break at a debate.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

In the battle of wealthy gubernatorial self-funders in 2018, there was no contest as to who was willing and able to spend more of their own money: On that score, Democrat Ned Lamont outspent Republican Bob Stefanowski, $11 million to $1 million after the August primaries.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When it comes to being a check on the president's power, many say Congress has fallen down on the job. But another force has risen up to take over that role: state attorneys general.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

The chief counsel to the state Senate Republicans has been fired after admitting misappropriating tens of thousands of dollars from an election expenses account. Michael Cronin was confronted Monday by the caucus leader, state Senator Len Fasano, after vendors complained of unpaid bills, and a check was bounced.

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

A narrative often repeated by Connecticut Republicans and others is that state residents are sick of the high taxes and government ineptitude, and ready to bolt to greener pastures.

But new census data isn't all doom and gloom. Out-migration trends that soiled Connecticut's reputation in recent years are dissipating, according to a Hartford Courant editorial. In certain key categories, it found recent population losses have turned into population gains.

"I'm going to look like a laser beam in terms of how this impacts economic growth and what it'll mean for a budget,"  Lamont said. He takes over as governor on January 9, 2019.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Ned Lamont wants to focus on job creation and economic development as he prepares to assume Connecticut’s governorship.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

This year’s race for governor saw candidates spending a lot of money for each vote cast. Democrat Ned Lamont outspent his Republican opponent nearly two to one.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

We’re still finding out results from last Tuesday’s elections in Connecticut and that’s not surprising, really. Some of the races were just really close. That’s probably a good thing.

Another good thing: Lots of people showing up to vote. Gigantic numbers showing up to vote in a midterm election in Connecticut and just about everywhere.

The bad thing: We still can’t seem to get this election thing right at least in our cities.

This hour, we look at possible fixes.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Days after midterm voting, as ballots are still being counted, Republican lawmakers who are holding on to tight leads in midterm states are alleging foul play and voter fraud. The claims were amplified by President Trump, without evidence, on Friday morning.

Democrat Jahana Hayes addresses her supporters in Waterbury after declaring victory in her U.S. House race against Republican Manny Santos. Hayes becomes the first black woman elected to Congress in Connecticut.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

A record number of residents voted on Tuesday -- electing, among others, Connecticut’s first African American woman to Congress. This hour we talk with Jahana Hayes about her historic win. We also break down what happened in other midterm races, where Democrats achieved major victories in the governorship and General Assembly.

And we want to hear from you. What issues do you want our newest leaders to tackle first?

Armando Herreria

In theory, anyone who’s eligible but not registered in the state of Connecticut can register to vote the day of an election and cast a provisional ballot. But it’s a three-step process which takes some time, and that was the stumbling block for New Haven during Tuesday's election.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Women won big in these 2018 Connecticut midterm elections. This follows a national trend sparked in response to the 2016 election of Donald Trump. More women ran and more women won, many in seats not held by a Democrat in decades, let alone by a woman. 

Today, an hour with several of Connecticut's new female legislators. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s next governor will be Democrat Ned Lamont. Republican Bob Stefanowski conceded the race to his opponent just before 9:00 a.m.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Upstart candidates like Connecticut's Jahana Hayes played a big role in Democrats regaining control of the U.S. House of Representatives in Tuesday's election. Hayes' victory over Republican opponent Manny Santos also kept the GOP locked out of the state's congressional delegation yet again.

Updated at 3:44 a.m. ET Wednesday

Republicans and Democrats will split control of Congress next year. House Democrats are projected to pick up enough GOP-held seats to take the majority in the House, according to The Associated Press. Senate Republicans are projected to maintain and perhaps expand their majority.

The results create a divided Capitol Hill next year and mean President Trump's plans for new tax cuts, tougher immigration legislation and changes to the Affordable Care Act will be blocked.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Democrat Jahana Hayes, an educator who rose from poverty and teen motherhood to become a National Teacher of the Year, made her own history Tuesday night as the first black woman elected to Congress from the state of Connecticut.

Democrats Make Solid Gains In General Assembly

Nov 6, 2018
Adavyd / Creative Commons

Democrats made their first state legislative gains in 10 years Tuesday night, breaking an 18-18 tie in the Senate by picking up three Republican seats and defending vulnerable Democratic lawmakers who were targeted by the GOP. 

Murphy Declared Winner In U.S. Senate Race

Nov 6, 2018
Sen. Chris Murphy
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Democratic U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy coasted to re-election Tuesday as record numbers of voters went to the polls in a historic midterm election that will determine which party controls the next Congress.

Mark Goebel / Creative Commons

We have a tradition on the show of celebrating voting and the people who vote by speaking to thoughtful "citizen observers" from around the state about their experience of voting on this Election Day. 

Polls Close After A Day Of Heavy Voter Turnout In Connecticut

Nov 6, 2018
Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

At least some of the ballots cast in Connecticut seem destined for controversy after a day of heavy turnout and long lines in the mid-term elections. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's November 6, which means the wait for Election Day is finally over.


As Connecticut voters head to the polls, we sit down with reporters and election officials to preview the day ahead.

Do you plan on voting? We want to hear from you, too.

Kevin Burkett (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Follow live coverage of the 2018 midterm elections, including results and analysis. Get caught up on the latest news from around the country.

It's Election Day. Here's What You Need To Know

Nov 6, 2018
Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Today’s congressional midterm elections have focused national attention on the balance of power in Washington, DC. But, with a tight race for governor and a state Senate that is evenly split along major party lines, Connecticut’s statewide races have the potential to shift the balance of power in what has often been seen as a reliably blue state.

Here’s what you need to know.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The nerves are kicking in, said Constanza Segovia, talking politics outside her house in Hartford before Election Day. The stakes are high -- nationally and in the Connecticut gubernatorial race.

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

It's almost over. One more day of lawn signs, robocalls, nasty mailers and deceptive commercials. Election Day is upon us and is shaping up to bring an unprecedented number of voters to the polls.  

Under normal circumstances, America's midterm elections tend to elicit shrugs outside the U.S. The world usually focuses on U.S. elections when the president's name is on the ballot. But if you're an American overseas these days, you may be quizzed on what will happen in Tuesday's midterms.

Leslie Vinjamuri, an American political scientist who has lived in London for more than a dozen years, says in the run-up to this year's midterms, she has been getting questions every day.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Team Hayes brought out the bullhorn. A League of Women Voters debate was starting in an hour in Danbury, Conn., so a crew of volunteers set up on the side of the road, waving campaign signs at passing cars and chanting about change.

SHU/Hearst Poll Has Stefanowski Ahead By 2.4 Points

Nov 1, 2018
Sacred Heart University

His lead of 2.4 points is within the margin of error, but Republican Bob Stefanowski nudged ahead of Democrat Ned Lamont for the first time Thursday in a Sacred Heart University/Hearst Connecticut Media poll in the Connecticut gubernatorial race.

Republican nominee for governor, Bob Stefanowski.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Chip Toth was working at General Electric when he found himself across the table from Bob Stefanowski. The two men both worked at GE, but in different divisions, competing for the same customers.

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