Where We Live | Connecticut Public Radio
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Where We Live

MONDAYS, TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS, AND FRIDAYS AT 9:00 AM AND 8:00 PM

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories. Join the conversation with host Lucy Nalpathanchil, every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Contact Where We Live:

Senior Producer: Tess Terrible

Producer: Carmen Baskauf

Reach us when we're live at 888-720-9677. Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at 860-275-7272.

The Book 2.0

Jul 21, 2011
goXunuReviews, Creative Commons

Borders Books reached its height in 2005 with more than 1,200 bookstores around the world. In a few weeks, there will be no more.

Where We Vote: Susan Bysiewicz

Jul 20, 2011
Chion Wolf

Susan Bysiewicz is hoping to turn her name recognition and long political career in Connecticut into a spot in the US Senate. 

Bysiewicz was Connecticut’s popular Secretary of the State, when she decided to give up that job to run for Governor.  Then, in the first round of the bizarre political shakeup of 2010, she left that race while in the lead to run for the Attorney General’s job, being vacated by now Senator Richard Blumenthal.

Baseball Legends

Jul 19, 2011
Courtesy of Boston Public Library

Today,  a baseball celebration - about heroes and the places where they play.  We’ll talk with the author of a new oral history of Fenway Park; with the organizers of a Hartford Little League trying to stay afloat; and hear a classic public radio documentary about the real homerun champion.

Big City Violence

Jul 14, 2011
Chion Wolf

The number of violent crimes in the US dropped significantly last year to the lowest rate in 40 years.

But then why haven’t Connecticut cities like Hartford and New Haven been able to join this trend?  

The Education Takeover

Jul 13, 2011

The city of Bridgeport is the latest struggling school district to be taken over by the state.

The Board of Education in the city has essentially voted to dissolve itself - to be replaced by an oversight board hand-picked by the State Department of Education.

Men At Work, With Added Stress

Jul 12, 2011
Chion Wolf

A new Pew study says the sluggish recovery from the “Great Recession” has been better for men than women.

But in the context of  the June recent jobs report that shows only 18,000 new jobs were created nationally - it might signal continued bad times for both sexes.

The New "Normal" In Eating Disorders

Jul 11, 2011
Tara Gulwell, Creative Commons

Here’s the misperception: Eating disorders affect white, middle and upper class women.  A new study says, “not true.”  

The study, published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, finds that Native American women are just as likely to suffer from binging and purging as white women.

Olmsted's Legacy

Jul 8, 2011
creative commons

Combating Food Allergies

Jul 6, 2011
vizzzual

Thirty years ago, food allergy was extremely rare. Today, about 5.9 million U.S. children under 18 suffer from this potentially life-threatening condition.

That’s 1 in every 13 children. Or, to look at it another way, one student per classroom has a food allergy. What’s more, nearly 2 out of every 5 affected children suffer from a severe food-allergy.

Animal Rights

Jul 5, 2011
Mike Baird

Michael Vick is once again a star in the Nike universe - only a few years after serving time for his role in a dog-fighting ring.

Sounds Around Us

Jun 30, 2011
ky olsen, creative commons

If you stop and really listen, there’s a world of sound all around you.

For many people, this ambience of life is drowned out by the constant soundtrack of music...in our cars...on our headphones as we walk a city block or hop a subway.  

But today we’ll explore a different soundtrack, that of our actual surroundings.  

The idea came to us from two recent shows we did...one about how new technology is allowing us to map our worlds in all kinds of new ways...and another about field recordings as a type of cultural anthropology.

A Conversation with Hartford's State Legislators

Jun 29, 2011
Chion Wolf

Hartford is at a time of transition. Recovering from corruption, transforming its education planning for the future.

Today, Where We Live teams up with The Hartford Public Library for “The Year Ahead: A Conversation with Hartford’s State Legislators.” 

We'll be talking with members of the state congressional delegation from the city. They'll share their thoughts about the state of Hartford, and what lawmakers are doing to solve some of the city’s problems - from violence, to education scores, to literacy rates.

The New Cartography

Jun 27, 2011
Christine Rondeau, Creative Commons

Since the days of great explorers, maps have served a very simple purpose, getting us from point A to point B (without falling off the edge of the earth, of course). 

But with the advent of digital mapping technologies, the form, function and potential of maps has been revolutionized.

The Art of Field Recordings

Jun 24, 2011

Field recordings of traditional music and oral history have provided an important window into the past.  

Mystic Seaport has been collecting the stories of Connecticut’s dwindling fishing industry for exhibitions and books.  We’ll hear the voices of the men and women who keep alive our state’s only remaining commercial fishing fleet, and hear how Calabretta gathers these stories.  

Where We Live: Cocktails, A History Of

Jun 23, 2011
creative commons

WNPR has a popular regular show where food and drink flows freely.  This is not that show.

Yes, while Faith Middleton's Food Schmooze gets ready to crown a “Connecticut state cocktail” tonight - we’ll take our “sober” look at the history of the cocktail.

Journalists In Conflict

Jun 22, 2011
Creative Commons

As we get ready to consider an end to the war in Afghanistan, it's not just soldiers who've paid the price in American wars.

American society is just beginning to seriously consider the emotional trauma of fighting war. But what about reporting it?  The deaths of two photojournalists in Libya this year sparked fresh conversation about the emotional and psychological — and not just physical — health of reporters and photographers who cover conflict.

On Fatherhood

Jun 17, 2011
JeffS, Creative Commons

Looking for a Father's Day card you might think that all dads do is grill, golf and goof around. Those themes run through the imagery of this holiday. You can see the picture now - a tired man, finally able to relax in the hammock one day of the year. Dog at his side, hot dog on the grill.  But we know that being a dad is a bit more complex.

International Festival of Arts and Ideas

Jun 15, 2011
Uma Ramiah

This past weekend kicked off the annual International Festival of Arts and Ideas, a highlight of the summer in New Haven.

For 15 days the festival creates an environment of entertainment and serious discourse in the city through concerts, lectures, films, live theater, tours and activities for kids.

We didn’t want to miss out on the action so we headed down to New Haven for a live broadcast today from The Study at Yale.

The Question Of Jewish Identity

Jun 13, 2011
Gregthebusker, creative commons

Young people today have a lot of ways to define themselves – their clothes, their music, their Facebook profiles.  But what about religious and cultural identity?  These things are a bit trickier, especially for young secular Jews.  What does this identity mean today in a world where Israel is a place of pilgrimage, and the center of the thorniest political issues we face today?

The Future Of Our Forests

Jun 10, 2011
notfrancois, creative commons

Hedge Funds

Jun 8, 2011
AMagill, Creative Commons

Hedge Fund managers are America’s new economic elite...they weathered the storm of the financial collapse better than anyone, and have made the kind of money that’s hard to imagine.  In fact, author Sebastian Mallaby calls it “More Money Than God.” He’s studied the history of hedge funds for this bestselling book that’s - now out in paperback.  

He paints a picture of complicated men - who crave secrecy, exude eccentricity, and who have unlocked the mystery of how markets work, making billions in the process.

Ikea

Jun 7, 2011
Per Ola Wiberg, Creative Commons

You can find a blog called Colorado Ikea Fans” - where you’ll see a real-time countdown to the store’s opening in Denver on July 27th at 9 AM.  

Now, anxious shoppers - we’ve learned - will be lining up 48 hours before opening day.   

The Ikea craze is widespread – indoctrinating us with their “Life Improvement Plan” mentality.  

Putting Humanity Back Into Medicine

Jun 6, 2011
Brittany G, Creative Commons

Doctors get years of training in medicine, but what’s often left out is humanity.

The relationship between doctor and patient is among the most important many of us will have in their lives, yet it’s becoming increasingly depersonalized thanks to overwhelming patient loads.

But there’s a growing field of study - and practice - that aims at putting the humanities back into doctor’s training...to better treat the humans they serve.

Poisoned By Food

Jun 2, 2011
Creative Commons

E. coli, Salmonella, Listeria, Cyclospora - All bacteria that have caused food borne illnesses and deaths in the past decades.

Smart Giving

Jun 1, 2011

We give billions to charity every year, but are we actually solving the world’s problems? When we look at the programs meant to fight global poverty and disease, we tend to see two poles...either we just need more money thrown into the aid programs we now have, or we realize that all these billions are just going down the drain.

Memorials

May 31, 2011
karu101, Creative Commons

Connecticut is host to hundreds of war memorials and monuments dating back all the way back to the Civil War.

These memorials are usually very literal - depictions of heroic figures or commemorations of the war dead.  Or, they are truly monumental - points of civic pride meant to be gathering places for the community.

But over time, memorials have grown increasingly conceptual and abstract, and are often a touchstone for controversy

Memorials

May 31, 2011
karu101, Creative Commons

Connecticut is host to hundreds of war memorials and monuments dating back all the way back to the Civil War. These memorials are usually very literal - depictions of heroic figures or commemorations of the war dead. Or they are truly monumental: points of civic pride meant to be gathering places for the community. But over time, memorials have grown increasingly conceptual and abstract, and are often a touchstone for controversy.

Exploring Jazz at Firehouse 12

May 27, 2011
Chion Wolf, WNPR

Firehouse 12 in New Haven  is an innovative space that is part of a neighborhood resurgence in downtown New Haven. In fact, the jazz trumpeter and composer Taylor Ho Bynum says that there are only a few places like it in the world. It's a high-tech recording studio that presents avant garde jazz, while attracting a crowd to its downstairs cocktail bar.  The setting is a renovated firehouse in the up-and-coming Ninth Square neighborhood, newly filled with restaurants and galleries.

Transportation and Jobs

May 26, 2011
jjsala, Creative Commons

Nearly 30 million trips are made every day using public transit, mostly in the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas.  And the main destination of these millions of commuters is, not surprisingly, work.  So a new Brookings report surveyed public transit in 100 cities in the U.S. including Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford, to see just how effective public transit is in getting people to their jobs every day.

Where We Live: Transportation and Jobs

May 26, 2011
jjsala, Creative Commons

Nearly 30 million trips are made every day using public transit, mostly in the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas.  And the main destination of these millions of commuters is, not surprisingly, work.  So a new Brookings report surveyed public transit in 100 cities in the U.S. including Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford, to see just how effective public transit is in getting people to their jobs every day.

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