Where We Live | Connecticut Public Radio
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Where We Live

MONDAYS, TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS, AND FRIDAYS AT 9:00 AM AND 8:00 PM

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories. Join the conversation with host Lucy Nalpathanchil, every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Contact Where We Live:

Senior Producer: Tess Terrible

Producer: Carmen Baskauf

Reach us when we're live at 888-720-9677. Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at 860-275-7272.

Cheating Schools

Aug 18, 2011
albertogp123

The state is investigating teachers and staff at a Waterbury elementary school about suspected cheating on the 2011 Connecticut Mastery Tests.

This follows widespread cheating scandals uncovered in the District of Columbia, Baltimore and Atlanta…just this year.  In a story this month, the magazine Education Week put it this way:

“As long as test scores are used in any field to make decisions on rewards or punishments, including for schools or educators, a small percentage of people will be willing to bend the rules - or break them.”

Where We Live: Spoonful Of Sugar

Aug 16, 2011
Photo by Mykl Roventine (Flickr)

How much sugar do you eat? The U.S.D.A. estimates the average American consumes more than 3,500 pounds of sugar in their lifetime.

Sugar seems to be in or on everything. Cereal, coffee, yogurt, candy, ketchup and of course...soda. It certainly affects our health, and is seen as the main culprit in “epidemics” of obesity and diabetes.

But sugar has also impacted the course of history, changed the fate of empires, and affected millions.

New Haven Mayoral Debate

Aug 11, 2011
Photos by Thomas MacMillan (New Haven Independent)

In 1994, John DeStefano took over as mayor of New Haven and has held the position ever since.

Tonight, with the primary just over a month away, DeStefano squares off in a debate with four Democratic opponents.

Connecticut Civil War History Tour

Aug 10, 2011
juliejordanscott

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the American Civil War, and the state of Connecticut is paying tribute.

Earlier this year, we talked a bit about Connecticut’s civil war history - and got a big response.  Including from our friend, author and historian Bill Hosley.  

The Fracking Debate

Aug 9, 2011
Photo by Rennett Stowe (Flickr)

Natural gas is responsible for more of New England’s energy than you might expect.

More than 40 percent of power plants in our region are fueled by gas. It’s cleaner - though more expensive to burn - than coal. And with the cost of heating oil high - many homeowners have switched over.

For years, we’ve had to pipe it in from as far away as The Gulf of Mexico.

Increases in the Income Tax

Aug 8, 2011
Office of Policy and Management Secretary Ben Barnes
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Income tax increases are being felt in some paychecks while tax breaks are going out to some big companies.

Those tax increases are being felt mostly by Connecticut’s wealthiest residents...and are showing up in paychecks now.  It’s an issue of “fairness” according to some - but another look at the numbers shows the state’s revenue stream is more “volatile” because of a dependence on the rich.

Photo by Steven Sussman (Litchfield Jazz Festival)

The New York Times called drummer Matt Wilson an “ambassador of good feeling.” It’s a role he takes both seriously...and not all that seriously at all. Drummers have a long history of being the cut-ups in the band and Wilson carries that tradition forward, bringing a sense of humor and adventure to the music. He’s been known to play toy drums onstage - but he’s also played with some of the most seriously talented musicians around - Charlie Haden, John Scofield...and the late Dewey Redman, who he recorded this with back in 1996.

Robert Ballard Is Back At It

Aug 5, 2011
© Ocean Exploration Trust

After discovering the shipwrecked Titanic in 1985, Dr. Robert Ballard could have retired and still gone down as one of the greatest explorers ever. More than 25 years later though, he’s still at it.

His latest expedition is underway and he’s monitoring its every move from his control room in Mystic Aquarium, his computer at home, and on his iPhone everywhere else.

Google's World

Aug 2, 2011
Photo by Robert Scoble (Flickr)

What company became so successful that its name is now used as a verb? If you’re not sure, well, maybe you should Google it.

Google started as a search engine but it has grown to include email, calendars, documents, maps, even mobile operating systems.

Online Civility

Aug 1, 2011
Photo by Basheer Tome (Flickr)

We used to discuss the news around the water cooler, at the barbershop and sometimes at dinner. Now, we can get right online and tell people how we REALLY feel...

Is there anyplace more cringe-worthy than the “comments section” of a news website?

The intentions were good: providing readers with a place to discuss the stories.

But all too frequently there’s name-calling and hateful comments, all disguised by anonymous “handles.”

Roundtable on the Looming Debt Crisis

Jul 29, 2011
Mike Poresky

Yesterday, Republicans who control the house finally addressed the issue that's been gripping the nation: Naming Post Offices.

Yes, when it became clear that House Speaker John Boehner's two-stage solution to avert the debt crisis was not going to get enough votes from within his caucus, the House quickly turned to the important task of naming the Post Offices in Peoria and Pasadena.   

Collaborative Consumption

Jul 28, 2011
Book Cover Design by Nicholas Blechman

We all have junk...maybe too much. You know, the stuff we just don’t use that much. But what if there was a way to make better use of it?

For instance, you use a lawn mower once every few weeks. Your weed-whacker might get used once a year. So why spend hundreds of dollars on something that only occasionally gets used?

That’s one of the questions being asked by people taking part in what is being called “Collaborative Consumption.” Why buy something when you can swap, share, barter, trade or rent for it instead?

William Tong

Jul 26, 2011
Chion Wolf / WNPR

What do you get when a little-known candidate raises more than a half-million dollars in the first months of a run for Senate?  Could it be “tong fever"?

Well, at least that’s what Colin McEnroe called it.  The condition is named after William Tong, who in 2006, became the first Asian American elected to a state office in Connecticut.  

Architecture In The Public Interest

Jul 25, 2011
Philippe AMIOT, creative commons

What if the blueprints to the next great American building were released to the public and it was designed collaboratively?

That’s a far cry from the “individualistic” approach in the iconic novel, “The Fountainhead.”  

This new idea suggests all of us might have something to contribute to Architecture.  It’s called “Open Source Architecture” and it’s based on an inclusive approach to the profession.

Jim Himes on the Budget Crisis

Jul 22, 2011
Chion Wolf / WNPR

With a 12-year career on Wall Street before coming to Congress, Jim Himes has become a “go-to” guy on questions about the debt ceiling.

The 4th district congressman has been making the rounds of cable talk shows, warning about the coming crisis if Congress doesn’t act to raise the debt ceiling.

He told the Connecticut Mirror that he’s trying to “debunk the baloney” that he says he hears coming from the likes of Tea Party Presidential Candidate Michele Bachman.

The Book 2.0

Jul 21, 2011
goXunuReviews, Creative Commons

Borders Books reached its height in 2005 with more than 1,200 bookstores around the world. In a few weeks, there will be no more.

Where We Vote: Susan Bysiewicz

Jul 20, 2011
Chion Wolf

Susan Bysiewicz is hoping to turn her name recognition and long political career in Connecticut into a spot in the US Senate. 

Bysiewicz was Connecticut’s popular Secretary of the State, when she decided to give up that job to run for Governor.  Then, in the first round of the bizarre political shakeup of 2010, she left that race while in the lead to run for the Attorney General’s job, being vacated by now Senator Richard Blumenthal.

Baseball Legends

Jul 19, 2011
Courtesy of Boston Public Library

Today,  a baseball celebration - about heroes and the places where they play.  We’ll talk with the author of a new oral history of Fenway Park; with the organizers of a Hartford Little League trying to stay afloat; and hear a classic public radio documentary about the real homerun champion.

Big City Violence

Jul 14, 2011
Chion Wolf

The number of violent crimes in the US dropped significantly last year to the lowest rate in 40 years.

But then why haven’t Connecticut cities like Hartford and New Haven been able to join this trend?  

The Education Takeover

Jul 13, 2011

The city of Bridgeport is the latest struggling school district to be taken over by the state.

The Board of Education in the city has essentially voted to dissolve itself - to be replaced by an oversight board hand-picked by the State Department of Education.

Men At Work, With Added Stress

Jul 12, 2011
Chion Wolf

A new Pew study says the sluggish recovery from the “Great Recession” has been better for men than women.

But in the context of  the June recent jobs report that shows only 18,000 new jobs were created nationally - it might signal continued bad times for both sexes.

The New "Normal" In Eating Disorders

Jul 11, 2011
Tara Gulwell, Creative Commons

Here’s the misperception: Eating disorders affect white, middle and upper class women.  A new study says, “not true.”  

The study, published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, finds that Native American women are just as likely to suffer from binging and purging as white women.

Olmsted's Legacy

Jul 8, 2011
creative commons

Combating Food Allergies

Jul 6, 2011
vizzzual

Thirty years ago, food allergy was extremely rare. Today, about 5.9 million U.S. children under 18 suffer from this potentially life-threatening condition.

That’s 1 in every 13 children. Or, to look at it another way, one student per classroom has a food allergy. What’s more, nearly 2 out of every 5 affected children suffer from a severe food-allergy.

Animal Rights

Jul 5, 2011
Mike Baird

Michael Vick is once again a star in the Nike universe - only a few years after serving time for his role in a dog-fighting ring.

Sounds Around Us

Jun 30, 2011
ky olsen, creative commons

If you stop and really listen, there’s a world of sound all around you.

For many people, this ambience of life is drowned out by the constant soundtrack of music...in our cars...on our headphones as we walk a city block or hop a subway.  

But today we’ll explore a different soundtrack, that of our actual surroundings.  

The idea came to us from two recent shows we did...one about how new technology is allowing us to map our worlds in all kinds of new ways...and another about field recordings as a type of cultural anthropology.

A Conversation with Hartford's State Legislators

Jun 29, 2011
Chion Wolf

Hartford is at a time of transition. Recovering from corruption, transforming its education planning for the future.

Today, Where We Live teams up with The Hartford Public Library for “The Year Ahead: A Conversation with Hartford’s State Legislators.” 

We'll be talking with members of the state congressional delegation from the city. They'll share their thoughts about the state of Hartford, and what lawmakers are doing to solve some of the city’s problems - from violence, to education scores, to literacy rates.

The New Cartography

Jun 27, 2011
Christine Rondeau, Creative Commons

Since the days of great explorers, maps have served a very simple purpose, getting us from point A to point B (without falling off the edge of the earth, of course). 

But with the advent of digital mapping technologies, the form, function and potential of maps has been revolutionized.

The Art of Field Recordings

Jun 24, 2011

Field recordings of traditional music and oral history have provided an important window into the past.  

Mystic Seaport has been collecting the stories of Connecticut’s dwindling fishing industry for exhibitions and books.  We’ll hear the voices of the men and women who keep alive our state’s only remaining commercial fishing fleet, and hear how Calabretta gathers these stories.  

Where We Live: Cocktails, A History Of

Jun 23, 2011
creative commons

WNPR has a popular regular show where food and drink flows freely.  This is not that show.

Yes, while Faith Middleton's Food Schmooze gets ready to crown a “Connecticut state cocktail” tonight - we’ll take our “sober” look at the history of the cocktail.

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