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Where We Live

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Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories. Join the conversation with host Lucy Nalpathanchil, every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Contact Where We Live producer Carmen Baskauf.

Reach us when we're live at 888-720-9677. Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at 860-275-7272.

Our Growing Cities

Apr 20, 2011
Chion Wolf

It might be a stretch to say Connecticut cities are “booming,” but new census figures show they are growing.

People are starting to move back into Connecticut’s cities. This reverses a decades-long trend toward suburban sprawl and urban decline.  The five largest cities in the state have gained close to 23,000 residents.  There are more housing units, and more of those homes are filled with people.  

Tax Day

Apr 18, 2011
Chion Wolf

When critics say the state shouldn’t increase taxes on the wealthy, they often say that it’ll force the rich to leave Connecticut.  So, is it true?

Two new studies show - well, that’s it’s not true at all.  That other factors, beyond the tax rate, are what drives people to make decisions about where to live.  

Tax Day

Apr 18, 2011
Chion Wolf

When critics say the state shouldn’t increase taxes on the wealthy, they often say that it’ll force the rich to leave Connecticut.  So, is it true?

Two new studies show - well, that’s it’s not true at all.  That other factors, beyond the tax rate, are what drives people to make decisions about where to live.  

Immigration Day

Apr 13, 2011
Chion Wolf, WNPR

Today mark’s the state’s 14th Annual Immigrant Day

Financial Literacy and Connecticut's Kids

Apr 12, 2011
Chion Wolf

We’re struggling to get out of a recession, caused in part by borrowing way too much.  So, if grown-ups can’t manage their money – how should we expect kids to?

Many financial experts say that children aren’t learning the right lessons about how to handle their money.  Here’s an example: A recent study finds that today’s parents are “incredibly lenient” about handing their children extra money – you know, that 20 dollars to go see a movie, over and above their allowance.

Cross-Cultural "Oops"

Apr 11, 2011
Kenneth Lu / Creative Commons

So we keep hearing that we’re a “global society.”  But that can lead to some big gaps in cultural understanding. 

Today we talk to international businesspeople, consultants, and bi-lingual Americans who have learned how to negotiate across cultures…a necessity in a world where we’re all connected, but all communicate very differently.  

But even the most seasoned multi-cultural travelers can tell of laughable faux-pas and huge business deals gone sour, over mere misunderstandings.

The Government Shutdown

Apr 8, 2011

There’s a midnight deadline.  If a deal between lawmakers and the White House can’t be struck, the federal government shuts down.

And the next question is…does it matter?  We’re being assured that even in shut-down mode, our mail still gets delivered, entitlement benefits will still be paid, the military will keep fighting on three fronts. 

But other services you count on from the government are still kind of up in the air.  That expedited passport for the surprise Caribbean cruise?  The big tax refund you were planning on to pay for said cruise?

New Media Partnerships in Journalism

Apr 7, 2011
Elvert Barnes, Creative Commons

For years, we’ve been hearing about the chronic struggles of newspapers and the proliferation of so called “new media” sources of journalism.  

As one outcome of this change, the traditional competition for stories between papers has given way to a new era of cooperation. By pooling resources and working together, these upstarts are making a real impact, informing the community, and driving the discussion in collaboration with newspapers.  

Today we continue our series of conversations recorded at a conference called “Lifting the Veil: Journalism Uncovered.”

Roots of Prejudice

Apr 6, 2011
Linda, Creative Commons

Prejudice is one of the more troubling and baffling aspects of human nature

It has been the subject of scientific study for years.  But while social psychologists have learned a great deal about attitudes and societal influences that cause intergroup conflict, little effort has been devoted to understanding how adult humans come to have these biases in the first place.  So a Yale study set out to discover the roots of human prejudice, by studying groups of rhesus monkeys.

No Peace in the Middle East

Apr 5, 2011
John Ryan Recabar

Today we talk with Palestinian physician Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish. In 2009 during Israel’s invasion and bombardment of Gaza, a rocket hit his house killing three of his daughters and his niece. Author of “I Shall Not Hate,” Abuelaish has devoted his life to reconciliation between Israelis and Palestinians.

Our Abolitionist History

Apr 4, 2011

In New London, a house tells the story of slavery, race and abolition. 

Multi-media artist Judy Dworin’s new work “In This House” is inspired by the Joshua Hempstead House in New London. 

The home has a legacy as a place where a slave was kept – now it sits in the middle of a neighborhood where African Americans and Hispanics live.  We’ll talk to Dworin and her collaborators about the house’s history, and what it tells us about Connecticut.

Malloy, Cuomo, LePage

Apr 1, 2011

So, these three Governors walk into a town hall meeting.  One’s a member of the tea party, one is Mario Cuomo’s kid, and the third guy’s wearing a green tie.

I think I’m telling this wrong. The joke’s also supposed to include something about a labor department mural in Maine, and the terms “shared sacrifice” and “transformational.” 

The new Governors across our region are all facing big budgetary challenges, and they’re handling them in very different ways.

David Folkenflik at CCSU

Mar 31, 2011

NPR's David Folkenflik once got into a battle of words with Geraldo Rivera.  It just proves that covering the media isn't always pretty. 

His latest assignment is a perfect example: Cover the corporate meltdown of your own company...go! 

Labor, After the Fire

Mar 28, 2011
Library of Congress

On Friday’s show Governor Dannel Malloy took a hard line with state labor unions – if they don’t reach an agreement on concessions, massive layoffs are on the table.

Governor Malloy said about the possibility of layoffs: “If it’s the only option, it’s the only option to pursue.” Today we’ll get reaction from an official from the state’s employee unions.

Governor Dannel Malloy

Mar 25, 2011
Chion Wolf

Dannel Malloy said he’d be more open to the press – more “communicative” than the previous governor.  I guess he wasn’t kidding…

Since his budget speech, Malloy has embarked on a voyage through Connecticut towns and cities that would seem ambitious by the standards of a touring rock band. 

And like those bands, grinding it out on the road – it must be getting a bit old by now. 

Shirin Ebadi

Mar 24, 2011
jyc1, creative commons

Shirin Ebadi is an Iranian Human Rights attorney, who in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her work on behalf of democracy and human rights - especially for women and children.  She’s speaking on the “Role of the West in Iran’s Struggle for Freedom,” this Saturday, March 26th at 6:30 at Hartford Seminary.  She’s also the headline speaker for the 2011 PeaceJam Northeast Youth Conference at Watkinson School in Hartford this weekend. 

NPR To The Left To The Left?

Mar 24, 2011
Todd Huffman

NPR is under attack over funding, fundraising and claims of bias.  So what does the network’s Ombudsman think?

We have Alicia Shepard, NPR’s Ombudsman on Where We Live regularly to talk about journalism, and the job that NPR reporters and editors do. 

She’s leaving the network, just as NPR has become a national issue on Fox News and the butt of jokes on The Daily Show. 

Northeast Utilities and NSTAR Move to Merge

Mar 23, 2011
Paul Cross, Creative Commons

The proposed merger of Northeast Utilities and NSTAR would create the third largest utility in the country and the largest in New England

NU of course is based in Connecticut and NStar in Massachusetts.  The companies would retain headquarters in both states, but the top executives would be in Boston.

So, what does this mean for you?

UConn President Susan Herbst

Mar 22, 2011
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Susan Herbst is the new President of the University of Connecticut.  She says the state needs a school it can “brag on.”

Coming from the University System of Georgia, she says that’s a “Southern” code phrase for making UConn a flagship University in the mold of Michigan or Berkeley - an internationally recognized research center that has a powerful “academic brand.”

Japan, One Week Later

Mar 18, 2011
Fox News Insider, Creative Commons

After a full week of pictures and words and statistics, it’s still hard to get a grip on the scope of the tragedy.  Thousands killed, with many thousands more missing.  Hundreds of thousands without water or shelter.  And, the specter of a nuclear meltdown that has taken the world’s attention away from the devastation of the original event.

Today, a week after the earthquake – we’ll look at Japan.  How it’s coping, and how people in Connecticut are helping.

Dan Esty Goes DEEP

Mar 17, 2011
Chion Wolf, WNPR

Dan Esty is the new head of the Department of Environmental Protection – and if Governor Dannel Malloy gets his way, that job will grow to include “Energy” in the title. 

Esty’s a Yale professor who’s advised President Obama on energy policy, and several corporations on how to “go green.” 

He’s been talking about how to create more “green jobs” in the state – how to speed up the DEP’s permitting process – and how to bring down our sky-high energy costs. But this is a big job. So how is he going to protect the environment while making life easier for business?  

The Young And Unemployed

Mar 16, 2011
bgottsab, creative commons

Across the country, millions are still unemployed…and they’re not just older workers who’ve been laid off.

The most recent government report says nearly 20% of young adults don’t have jobs.

Recently on the show we talked about “emerging adulthood” – the phenomenon of young people postponing marriage and parenthood until at least their late twenties, and spending lots of time in self-focused exploration. 

Recession Redefines The Modern Family

Mar 15, 2011
woodleywonderworks, creative commons

The American family has been changing for decades and attitudes about what makes up a family have been changing as well.

But, it seems the recession has sped up the process. 

Most of the lost jobs in the last few years were lost by men – that tipped the balance of the workforce toward women for the first time in American history. The change is redefining gender roles and relationships at home in ways not seen since the Great Depression.

Winning

Mar 14, 2011
D. Basu, Creative commons

You can win the peace, win the future, win the game, win the lottery, or if you’re Charlie Sheen you can just be “A Winner.”

You’ve heard variations on the saying, “Winning isn’t everything…it’s the only thing.”  Motivational, to be sure – but when winning is the only goal, does that make most of us “losers?

Tri-State Area Budget Edition

Mar 11, 2011
Creative Commons

Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey are all talking about taxes and public sector unions.

It’s a different kind of conversation in the Northeast than they’re having in say, Wisconsin - but the rhetoric is still kind of hot.

Dannel Malloy dubbed himself the “Anti-Christie” (take that New Jersey!) and then got a nice write-up in the New York Times for what they called a “Better Budget” proposal without bombast.

King Hearings On Muslim Radicalization

Mar 10, 2011
DMahendra, Creative Commons

Today, Long Island Congressman, Peter King, holds a hearing called "The Extent of Radicalization in the American Muslim Community and that Community's Response."

As chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, King says he wants to look into the threat of homegrown terrorism and its ties to Islam.

On the Repeal of Capital Punishment

Mar 9, 2011
Casey Serin

On the day Illinois is expected to abolish the death  penalty, Connecticut lawmakers are grappling with the same question.

Democrats in this state who want to repeal the law allowing executions feel this is their year - with a Governor who says he’ll sign a “prospective” law.  But many people from both parties want to keep the punishment as a tool for prosecutors.

Tracking Lost Civilizations

Mar 8, 2011
National Geographic

Could it be true?!  The lost city of Atlantis has been found!  Well, not yet, but a University of Hartford archeologist is on the case.

Farai Chideya

Mar 7, 2011

Farai Chideya has been following the intersections of race and gender, pop culture and politics for years.  During the 2010 campaign, she hosted a series of election specials for public radio in association with her blog, “pop and politics” – where she traveled the country, talking to voters about their lives and what drives their votes.  She joined us to talk about African American women in politics.

A Look At Microfinance

Mar 7, 2011

Muhammad Yunus won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for his work pioneering the concept of “micro credit,” providing small loans to village entrepreneurs as a way to fight poverty. 

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