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The Colin McEnroe Show

Weekdays at 1:00 pm and 8:00 pm

We’re asking the people who listen to describe what it sounds like to them. Josh Dobbin, our unofficial ombudsman and possibly most prolific commenter, is taking the first crack.

“The sublime and the ridiculous are often so nearly related, that it is difficult to class them separately.”
Thomas Paine

The Colin McEnroe Show endeavors to prove Paine correct, every weekday. While the topics are unpredictable from one day to the next (previous show topics include whistling, placebos, politics, the nature of divinity, Barbra Streisand, bedbugs, human hydration, dinosaurs, unreliable narrators, ugliness, and raccoons), what is always assured is that a thoughtful, smart, and interesting exploration and conversation with amazing guests will take place about something.

Colin McEnroe is an author, playwright, professor, columnist, and blogger, who is allergic to penicillin and enjoys photographing his dog wearing hats and publishing those photos to the internet.

While we are live, call us at 860-275-7266. When we're live in our New Haven studios call us at 203-776-9677, or email us anytime at colinshow@ctpublic.org. To reach us in the newsroom when we're not on air, call 860-275-7272.

Contact CMS Producers:

The Senior Director is Catie Talarski. The Technical Producer is Chion Wolf. The Digital Producer is Carlos Mejia.

Are you looking for our Radio for the Deaf broadcasts? Those are all collected under our very special, and if you don't mind us saying very nice looking RFTD site.

Everyone Loves Trees

Mar 28, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, Magic Madzik

Flickr Creative Commons, Luiz Fernando

Speaking of Elizabeth Taylor and modern perceptions of American womanhood, Camille Paglia said this week "we're in a period now where everything has to be taut in mind and body."

Flickr Creative Commons, Don Hankins

Here, to me, are the killer statistics:

Elizabeth Taylor has died. But the moviegoing experience she embodied died long before her. 

Flickr Creative Commons, Hampton Roads Partnership

On today's show we're going to look at the elaborate networks -- pipeline is too straight and straightforward a word -- that exist in Connecticut to nurture new businesses -- which came to be called, in the last two decades -- "start ups."

Flickr Creative Commons, emilianohorcada

The idea that music can be medicine may strike some of you as woo-woo new age piffle. To a degree I had not understood until now, serious researchers all over the world as studying these connections and making astonishing breakthroughs.

Chion Wolf

Garrison Keillor has announced that he'll retire in 2013.

File Photo

**NOTE: Today's Playlist Is Posted Below**

For many years of my adult life, I rejected Irish-American culture. I don't particularly like the way St. Patrick's Day is celebrated in this country with green beer and bad music. Growing up in the 1960s, I had few exposures to anything deeper and "rootsier" than tacky Irish-American treacle.

Flickr Creative Commons, Murray State

Let me just throw it down right here. Bisons over Huskies. Not that I believe the UConn men will lose to Bucknell in the first round, but I will be rooting for that to happen. I've really had it with the UConn men's program. I'll happily root for the women.

Chion Wolf

Today's show was occasioned by a controversial New York Times page one article about Dr. Donald Levin.

It said: "Like many of the nation’s 48,000 psychiatrists, Dr. Levin, in large part because of changes in how much insurance will pay, no longer provides talk therapy, the form of psychiatry popularized by Sigmund Freud that dominated the profession for decades. Instead, he prescribes medication, usually after a brief consultation with each patient."

Flickr Creative Commons, Mykl Roventine

It's Pi Day, and we have to ask, can numbers be sexy?

Flickr Creative Commons, mrgilles

So you think you had a bad week? National Public Radio can top you

Flickr Creative Commons, audreyjm529

In Liz Canner's documentary "Orgasm, Inc.," officials from one drug company admit that they were drawn heavily into the hunt for a female orgasm pill because of an incorrect press report that suggested they already had one.

Chion Wolf

I'm not even sure the comedy sub-species "impressionist" really exists any more.

Flickr Creative Commons, budcaddell

Remember Ted Williams, the man with the golden voice?

Flickr Creative Commons, stevendepolo

We can put a man on the moon. Why can't we make our roads look less like the moon?

Wolfie's Songs!

Mar 5, 2011
Wikimedia Commons

Should we even talk about Charlie Sheen on public radio? As an essayist in Slate pointed out this week, public radio listeners tend to write letters of complaint when NPR covers Justin Bieber, Ken and Barbie, Tiger Woods, Michael Jackson, rappers, Levi Johnston, Mel Gibson, heavy metal or sports. 

Chion Wolf

Twenty years ago, Connecticut was held in thrall by the murder conspiracy trial of Karin Aparo in connection with the murder of Karin's mother Joyce. 

Chion Wolf

Connecticut, unique among all states, has both a state poet laureate and a state troubadour. The first state poet laureate was James Merrill, appointed in the mid-1980s. Merrill graciously accepted the honor but said it was unlikely he would be writing poems for state occasions like, he said, the governor's birthday. Boy, was that an understatement.

Wikimedia Commons

As much as we romanticize the Leatherman, Connecticut's most famous vagabond, we should remember too that the post Civil War era -- his era -- was a time of tramp laws, meant to discourage exactly the sort of person he was.

Flickr Creative Commons, Tim Green aka atoach

A recent round of questions about conflicts of interest in the U.S. Supreme Court may place all three branches of government on a collision course.

Flickr Creative Commons, Dave_B_

The movie that had the biggest impact on the Academy Awards over the last ten years is one that did not win best picture ... or even get nominated - it was  "The Dark Knight," Christopher Nolan's 2008 Batman movie that was shunned in 2009.

Michael Kramer was an award-winning political columnist for Time and New York magazine. Now he’s the playwright behind “Divine Rivalry,” a show about da Vinci and Michaelangelo, making its world premier in Hartford. We’ll talk politics and art.

Chion Wolf and Colin will also read your e-mails in "The Sack," our weekly mailbag feature.

Leave your comments below, e-mail colin@wnpr.org or Tweet us @wnprcolin.

Flickr Creative Commons, theslowlane

Radio wears a lot of different outfits. On one end of the spectrum there's Clear Channel Communications, which owns 900 stations. On the other, there's a guy who broadcasts from the back of a truck in the Collinsville section of Canton on Saturdays.  

Flickr Creative Commons, Sam Howzit

Until recently, I didn't understand the degree to which Connecticut jury selection process -- called the voir dire -- differs from those of other states.

Flickr Creative Commons, Chascow

Earlier this week, Bernie Madoff gave an interview to a reporter working on a book called "Wizard of Lies, Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust." Wow. Prison must be really boring if he's willing to give that writer his time.

Flickr Creative Commons, AndyRob

I got my first glimpse at backstage Broadway when I was in the first grade.

Flickr Creative Commons, by Pulloa

Last winter, West Hartford residents David Foster and Denis Horgan began collecting used baseball equipment to be sent to kids across Cuba.

Wikimedia Commons

I started writing humor -- or trying, anyway, -- when my column launched in the Hartford Courant in 1982. 

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