When It Comes to Racial Profiling, Police Transparency, Where Does Connecticut Stand? | Connecticut Public Radio
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When It Comes to Racial Profiling, Police Transparency, Where Does Connecticut Stand?

Apr 9, 2015

The shocking video out of South Carolina has race and policing back on the front page. This hour, we learn what a new CCSU report tells us about racial profiling and traffic stops in Connecticut.

Also, Lawmakers are also considering a bill that would require the disclosure of arrest records. This comes after a state supreme court ruling last year that essentially allowed police to withhold information while prosecutions are pending.

This issue has pitted some police and prosecutors against freedom of information advocates - and raised concerns about protections for victims of crime. We'll listen back to a panel taped last week on police transparency. 

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Forum information: 

The first Connecticut Racial Profiling Prohibition Project Public Forum will take place on Monday, April 13, 2015 from 6 to 8 pm at New Haven City Hall.

GUESTS:

  • Ken Barone - Research and Policy Specialist for the Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy at CCSU
  • Earl Bloodworth - Information Officer for the African-American Affairs Commission
  • Dean Esserman - New Haven Police Chief 
  • Kevin Kane - Chief State’s Attorney
  • Tejas Bhatt - Assistant Public Defender in New Haven
  • Jim Smith - President of the Connecticut Council on Freedom of Information

John Dankosky and Chion Wolf contributed to this show.

The police transparency panel was co-sponsored by the Connecticut Foundation for Open Government. Listen to the entire panel discussion here: