Seeing The Cracks In Controversial Statues | Connecticut Public Radio
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Seeing The Cracks In Controversial Statues

Jul 23, 2020

Did you ever play the game Statues as a child? This is how you play:

A person starts out as the Curator and stands at the end of a field. Everyone else playing stands at the far end. The Curator turns their back to the field, and the "Statues" attempt to race across and tag the Curator. Whenever the Curator turns around, the Statues must freeze in position and hold that for as long as the Curator looks at them. If a Statue is caught moving, they are sent back to the starting line to begin again. The object of the game is for a "Statue" to tag the Curator, thereby becoming the Curator and resetting the game. 

Americans are starting to really examine the statues in their communities including here in our state. We are all acting as curators. This hour, we’re digging into the debate and we will hear from artists about sculpture today.

How do you view the role of monuments in your town? We want to hear from you.

GUESTS:

  • Dana King - sculptor and artist in Oakland, California (@danakingart360)
  • Alan Marcus - Professor at the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the Neag School of Education
  • Marisa Lerer, Ph.D. - Associate Professor of Art History at Manahattan College and Cochair of Public Art Dialogue (@PublicArtDialog)