Ryan Lindsay | Connecticut Public Radio
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Ryan Lindsay

REPORTER

Ryan Lindsay has been asking questions since she figured how to say her first few words. She eventually figured out that journalism is the profession where you can and should always ask questions.

While an undergraduate at Northwestern University, Ryan worked as a local reporter in Topeka, KS, and reported for the Medill Justice Project, formerly known as the Medill Innocence Project. While at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, she covered arts, culture and criminal justice in Oakland for The East Bay Express and Oakland North. She has also freelanced for The Athletic Bay Area, covering the on & off-the-court lives of Golden State Warriors players. Through the Prison University Project, Ryan taught journalism & storytelling to students at San Quentin State Prison.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As the one-year anniversary of the Parkland school shooting approaches, lawmakers and gun safety advocates reintroduced the Keep Americans Safe Act. Originally introduced after the 2017 Las Vegas mass shooting, the federal bill focuses on banning and classifying magazines that can hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition.

Lawmakers, law enforcement, and community organizers gathered in Bridgeport on Thursday to discuss youth violence.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

In the wake of a series of shootings involving teen shooters and victims, two Connecticut cities are outlining plans to address youth gun violence. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

As the month-marker of the partial government shutdown approaches, Transportation Security Administration employees at Bradley International Airport are turning to food donations to keep meals on their table.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Creative Commons

On Thursday, the Department of Agriculture announced a regulatory proposal that would impose stricter work requirements on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and strip states of their ability to make decisions based on local job conditions. The announcement comes after a Republican failure to impose those restrictions within the Farm Bill.

courtesy Domenic Esposito

Connecticut's Attorney General George Jepsen announced that the state is suing pharmaceutical company and opioid manufacturer Purdue Pharma, saying it mislead patients and doctors. Jepsen said the Stamford-based company downplayed the addiction risks for its prescription opioid medications.

More than 80 handguns were turned in at the 10th Annual Capital Region Gun Buyback. Officers used the back of the tags to write down information about the guns, which aren't actually loaded.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

At the 10th Annual Capitol Region Gun Buyback Program, 137 guns were turned in within six hours, doubling last year's numbers. 

Bump stocks harness a gun's recoil to speed up the rate of fire. Ten states banned the plastic attachments in the wake of a 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas.
Courtesy Michael Cargill

The Trump administration says it will soon place a federal ban on bump stocks, the gun attachments that allow semi-automatic rifles to fire faster. Ten states banned the plastic device after it was used by a gunman in Las Vegas to shoot and kill 58 people in 2017.

Erin Blinn-Curran / Connecticut Children's Medical Center

Some brands of slime, sirens and smart toys should be avoided this holiday season according to the 33rd annual Trouble in Toyland report. The highly toxic chemical boron is used in six different slime brands. Boron can cause nausea, vomiting and reproductive issues, posing a threat to the health of children and adults.

August Pelliccio / The Southern News, Southern Connecticut State University

David Hogg survived the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in February and on Tuesday night, he spoke to an audience at Southern Connecticut State University as a part of the university's Social Justice Month. It’s one of many speaking engagements he’s done since the Parkland, Florida mass shooting and part of a new lifestyle Hogg's adjusting to.

Adam Rosen / Congregation B'Nai Israel

The crowd of more than 750 people that gathered at Congregation B'Nai in Bridgeport for CONECT's Candidate Assembly on Monday was not expecting Shawn Wooden's vulnerabilty. They'd come to hear how five candidates running for statewide offices would respond to questions on four issues—gun violence, immigration, health care, and criminal justice reform—but it was the Democratic candidate for treasurer's story about gun violence, along with mothers Kristin Song's and Mory Hernandez's stories, that stood out.

Courtesy: Matt McDermott

American Outdoor Brands Corporation, the gun company formerly known as Smith & Wesson, held its annual shareholders’ meeting Tuesday. The meeting was webcast, but in Hamden and Bridgeport, a group of unusual shareholders met at local houses of worship to listen. These shareholders are shaking things up.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Before the Hartford Reentry Welcome Center opened, people in the city fresh out of prison didn’t have one central place where they could find housing, counseling or even a clean, safe place to use the bathroom. Now, they do. The center - located in City Hall -  is a partnership between Community Partners in Action, the City of Hartford, the Department of Corrections and more than 40 local organizations.

Governor Dannel Malloy's office

A Connecticut mother who lost her son during the September 11th attacks is still working to support the needs of other victims. Those needs include health care but the funding to continue providing screenings and treatment could be cut by the Trump administration. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

With school in session and safety top of mind for parents, students, teachers and politicians, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) is demanding clarity and accountability from U.S. Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. 

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