Ryan Lindsay | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Ryan Lindsay

REPORTER

Ryan Lindsay has been asking questions since she figured how to say her first few words. She eventually figured out that journalism is the profession where you can and should always ask questions.

While an undergraduate at Northwestern University, Ryan worked as a local reporter in Topeka, KS, and reported for the Medill Justice Project, formerly known as the Medill Innocence Project. While at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, she covered arts, culture and criminal justice in Oakland for The East Bay Express and Oakland North. She has also freelanced for The Athletic Bay Area, covering the on & off-the-court lives of Golden State Warriors players. Through the Prison University Project, Ryan taught journalism & storytelling to students at San Quentin State Prison.

U.S. Army

The Lamont administration says working families across the state with low to moderate incomes are beginning to see the impact of a $14 million federal investment in their child care needs. Care 4 Kids, a state and federally funded subsidy program, is using the federal money to increase how much families receive as reimbursement for infant and toddler care.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Daryl McGraw says he remembers when he was choked and tased by a police officer. He also remembers the years of his life that he was addicted to drugs -- and the 10 years he spent in and out of prison for drug-related offenses. Now he’s the co-chair of the state’s Police Transparency and Accountability Task Force.

The committee was created during the last legislative session with the passage of Public Act 19-90 in July 2019, An Act Concerning the Use of Force and Pursuits by Police and Increasing Police Accountability and Transparency.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Sen. Richard Blumenthal is joining with lawmakers from New York and Massachusetts in asking big tech companies like Apple and Google to help truckers avoid accidents and collisions with bridges.

He wants GPS apps like Waze, Google Maps and Apple Maps to include height and weight restrictions for limited-access highways like the Merritt and Wilbur Cross parkways.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A lawsuit by families of victims of the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School has the potential to significantly change what the world knows about how the gun industry thinks and operates. After years of delays, the lawsuit is moving forward, which may force the gun industry to make public what it considers private.

via WikiMedia Commons

More than two dozen new state laws go into effect on Jan. 1, ranging from expanded health insurance coverage and paid leave to changes in court, property and DMV rules.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Lawmakers and state leaders joined members of the Jewish community at a vigil in West Hartford Monday evening, in solidarity with the victims of a stabbing attack in New York.

Timothy Norris / Courtesy: The Hip Hop Nutcracker

“The Hip Hop Nutcracker” returns to The Bushnell for its third holiday season this Friday. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Securing funds to address gun violence was at the heart of a congressional and state legislative forum held in Hartford Monday afternoon. Advocates said they want to see successful national models to combat violence adopted here in Connecticut -- and they have an idea of how to find the necessary money. 

Senior Evan Prestera celebrates after the win.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Saturday marked seven years since the Sandy Hook Elementary School mass shooting that left 20 students and six educators dead. And, as a town came together to remember and to pray in the morning, it also came together to celebrate an unlikely football victory by night’s end. 

In this Thursday, April 27, 2006, file photo, Caroll Spinney, right, who portrays "Sesame Street" characters Oscar The Grouch, left, and Big Bird, arrives for the Daytime Emmy nominee party at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles.
Reed Saxon / AP Photo

For many, puppeteer Caroll Spinney and his iconic “Sesame Street” characters Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch are unforgettable. Longtime Connecticut resident Spinney, who passed away over the weekend, was one of the original cast members on the show and later wrote a book about his experience.

Adam Rosen / Congregation B'nai Israel

The state of Connecticut announced Tuesday that it plans to divest from its investments in civilian gun manufacturers -- the latest move in a state that has enacted stricter gun policies since the Newtown massacre.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Plenty of school districts were closed or delayed Tuesday morning, and the roads were treacherous as Connecticut began the clean up after round two of a one-two wintry punch. The state saw a huge range of overnight snow totals, ranging from a foot of new snow in some towns to just a few inches in others. The storm is expected to move out, leaving afternoon sunshine.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

The Connecticut Citizens Defense League’s co-founder and president, Scott Wilson, has announced he will not seek reelection after 10 years at the post.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

 

Five years after Lori Jackson was fatally shot by her husband, her parents continue to push for Congress to pass legislation that they believe could have saved their daughter’s life. 

Courtesy: The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

With more than 100 works of art, from sculptures and quilts to paintings and photographs, the Wadsworth Atheneum’s newest installation, Afrocosmologies: American Reflections, stands out as more than just an exhibit.

It’s an invitation to something curator Frank Mitchell calls a celebration.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

States that allow residents to carry a concealed firearm generally see more workplace homicides committed with guns, according to a new study from Eastern Connecticut State University.

Researchers analyzed 25 states that adopted the legislation between 1992 and 2017, and those states saw an average increase of 24% in the rates of workplace homicides committed with a firearm after the laws took effect. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

The fatal shooting of 21-year-old Taylor Irizarry on Wednesday marks Hartford’s 21st homicide of the year, surpassing 2018’s total of 20. Irizarry, a New Britain resident, was shot in the back during the early-morning hours, police said. Irizarry was transported to St. Francis Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Courtesy: The Wadsworth Atheneum

In conjuction with its newest exhibition Afrocosmologies: American Reflections, The Wadsworth Atheneum will host its Black Film Weekend featuring five films that celebrate and reflect stories of Black lives on screen. The films are a mix of fiction and non-fiction, from Toni Morrison and Harriet Tubman to two stories based in Jamaica, including the story of the island's national men's soccer team. 

Courtesy: Hartford Marathon Foundation

 

Runners from across the state will hit the streets tomorrow morning for the 26th annual Eversource Hartford Marathon. Organizers say to expect several road closures as early as 7 a.m.

 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

 

Melissa Potter was standing in her kitchen when the call came in. It was her estranged nephew, Brandon Wagshol, and she was surprised — he’d never called her before.

“When I saw his name on the caller ID, I got worried that maybe something horrible had happened,” Potter said. “Or, you know, maybe something was going on with the family that he needed to tell me about. So I picked up the phone.”

Ned Gerard / Hearst Connecticut Media

A Norwalk man arrested in August, accused of illegal possession of high capacity magazines will return to court in October following a hearing Friday.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Gun manufacturer Colt says it plans to end production of AR-15-style rifles for the civilian market. The company plans to limit its production to police and military contracts. 

Michael Zimmermann / Wikimedia Commons

 

 


Infowars founder Alex Jones has lost another legal battle against families who lost loved ones in the Sandy Hook Elementary School mass shooting. 

 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Forty years ago, a film called Hair starring a budding actor from Connecticut debuted at The Cannes Film Festival. It was 1979, the Vietnam War was over as were the days of hippies and The Black Panthers. Yet then and now, the on-screen musical still has a way of reaching audiences from past and present.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A group of teens from the Greater Hartford area spent their summer talking about and brainstorming solutions to gun violence within their communities. The Summer Youth Leadership Academy presented their solutions this week to city officials, community members and law enforcement under four umbrellas: accountability, preventing violence between youth, rehabilitation, and changing our violent culture.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Just ahead of a new school year, hundreds of families gathered in Hartford for CREC’s fifth annual Back to School Block Party.

The event has quickly become a community favorite, offering free ice cream and hot dogs, along with other items like water bottles and books. 

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

Pulitzer prize winning author Toni Morrison died Tuesday at the age of 88. As news of her death spread, tributes paying homage to her began pouring out on Twitter. Known for her striking command of language and vivid storytelling of Black life through multiple novels, Morrison's work left a mark on more than just writers.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Following multiple fatal shootings in Hartford last week, Mothers United Against Violence is holding a series of vigils to honor the victims. They've been organized to give the community an opportunity to grieve, come together and be encouraged.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A rise in the number of shootings in Hartford over the past few weeks is concerning residents and police. It's not uncommon for violence to spike during summers in the city but it's not something that goes unnoticed.

Dyzhae Richardson was standing outside on Sisson Avenue talking to a friend when he heard gunshots. He tried to duck but it was too late—he'd been shot. He looked down and saw blood on his hands. It was the morning of June 30th.

The Hartford Police Department will roll out 325 body cameras to its officers by the end of 2019.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

As public interest in fatal police use of force continues, a growing number of police departments have begun using body-worn cameras as tools for transparency and documentation of civilian interactions.

Pages