Ryan Lindsay | Connecticut Public Radio
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Ryan Lindsay

REPORTER

Ryan Lindsay has been asking questions since she figured how to say her first few words. She eventually figured out that journalism is the profession where you can and should always ask questions.

While an undergraduate at Northwestern University, Ryan worked as a local reporter in Topeka, KS, and reported for the Medill Justice Project, formerly known as the Medill Innocence Project. While at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, she covered arts, culture and criminal justice in Oakland for The East Bay Express and Oakland North. She has also freelanced for The Athletic Bay Area, covering the on & off-the-court lives of Golden State Warriors players. Through the Prison University Project, Ryan taught journalism & storytelling to students at San Quentin State Prison.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Howard K. Hill wants to bring the economic, social and cultural vibrancy back to Hartford’s Barbour Street. On a hot summer day, the funeral home owner may have been the only person dressed in a full suit strolling down a street peppered with closed businesses, dilapidated housing and streets in need of a serious cleanup.

Tenbeete Solomon

Bill Moore was 24 when police say he fired the bullets that would kill one 17-year-old and injure another.

He grew up in Hartford, Connecticut, and would hang out with friends who lived in the apartment building on Park Street that would eventually become a crime scene.

James Harris was 17-years-old when he survived being shot while hanging after school in Hartford, Connecticut.
Tenbeete Solomon

Renee White is trying to be patient and understanding as her son, James Harris, heals. He was shot alongside his best friend, Karlonzo Taylor, on a December afternoon in 2018. Karlonzo later died of his wounds.

Karlonzo Taylor was 17-years-old when he was fatally shot while hanging with friends after school in Hartford, Connecticut.
Tenbeete Solomon

Marvella Williams wasn’t expecting her 17-year-old son Karlonzo Taylor to die before she did, but he did. On a weekday in December 2018, Karlonzo became one of more than 7,000 Black boys and men who were fatally shot in the United States that year.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont Thursday continued his tour of towns throughout the state recovering from Tropical Storm Isaias, as residents tried their best to make do without power.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Black Lives Matter murals have been popping up across the country since the killing of George Floyd by police. In Hartford, a mural is tucked away in the city’s North End, with another in the works downtown. And in Stamford, the affirmation Black Lives Matter has been painted on a main street.

Cloe Poisson / CTMirror

The investigation into the death of a 19-year-old fatally shot in January by a state trooper in West Haven remains ongoing. Mark Arons, the attorney for the family of Mubarak Soulemane, says any reform of police accountability in Connecticut needs to address Soulemane’s death.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

At Bradley International Airport on a recent Wednesday, Lizzie McClellan had just gotten off a flight from Georgia, where she was visiting her grandmother for the last two weeks.

Georgia happens to be on a list of states that are becoming hot spots for new COVID-19 cases. McClellan said because she frequently went to places that were open there, she plans to quarantine at home in Connecticut and get tested. 

coronavirus empty supermarket shelves
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

More than 30,000 suddenly unemployed Connecticut residents became SNAP beneficiaries in the months since the coronavirus pandemic began in March. Now they and the more than 350,000 other SNAP recipients statewide can use their benefits online to order groceries from ShopRite, Walmart and Amazon.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Despite protests from community members and a proposal from two of its members to cut $9.6 million from the police budget, the Hartford city council voted Wednesday night for a $2 million reduction and reallocation of police funds. 

West Farms Mall
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Westfarms Mall reopened Wednesday after closing in March because of the coronavirus. But for the steady stream of shoppers, it wasn’t quite the same experience they might remember pre-pandemic. The mall has over 100 shops but because each corporate office makes the decision for its own stores, fewer than 30 were open -- and that meant some shoppers left empty-handed.

Shanta Grant is a CTtransit bus driver in Stamford who’s scared to go to work during the pandemic -- especially when passengers don’t wear masks.

“We are essential workers, we are on the front line each and every day putting ourselves at risk,” Grant said, “putting our families at risk, and we deserve hazardous pay. We deserve to be accommodated for our work.”

With just a handful of days to go until the state begins to formally, reopen, testing for coronavirus continues to be a major focal point -- and, on Saturday, the state saw a testing surge. 

COVID-19 testing
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Drive-through coronavirus testing centers in Hartford have been active for nearly two months, but many North End residents don’t have cars or rely on public transportation to get around. And other barriers, like a lack of health insurance or a doctor’s referral prevented others from getting tested for the disease.

foodshare
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

As Connecticut’s death toll continues to climb and the number of COVID-19-related hospitalizations continues to decline, Gov. Ned Lamont is calling for volunteers -- to help children and adults with intellectual disabilities and help get groceries and meals to senior citizens.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Essential workers throughout the state who’ve tested positive for COVID-19 say they are being denied workers' compensation benefits. Four women recovering from the virus spoke out during a news conference hosted by the Connecticut chapter of the AFL-CIO.

i-91
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The disparity between the rate of police traffic stops of Black and Hispanic drivers and their white counterparts shrank for a second consecutive year, according to the Connecticut Racial Profiling Prohibition Project (CTRP3).

Connecticut’s coronavirus hospitalizations continue to gradually decline, but COVID-19 confirmed cases and associated deaths continue to rise. On Saturday, state officials reported 97 additional COVID-19 related deaths — bringing the death toll to 2,436 people.

hartford healthcare
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford HealthCare has launched a mobile coronavirus testing program in partnership with the city of Hartford that will make it easier to bring testing to people who need it.

Hartford City Hall
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As Connecticut reported an additional 98 coronavirus-related deaths Saturday afternoon, the administration of Gov. Ned Lamont said it looks to increase testing capacity across the state as hundreds of residents continue to test positive each day. 

Miller Memorial Central Library
Ryan Caron King/Connecticut Public

National Library Week was forced to go digital this year. The American Library Association changed the original theme from “Find Your Place At The Library” to “Find The Library At Your Place” to bring attention to how libraries are still open online during the coronavirus pandemic.

Mark Twain Hartford Public Library
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Over the years, Hartford’s downtown public library has become a welcoming place for people in immigrant communities and for those experiencing homelessness. 

Since the branch had to close its doors over a month ago because of the coronavirus, the Hartford Public Library staff has been working to continue to serve those communities.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

The state reported an additional 41 coronavirus-related deaths Sunday, but it also reported that hospitalizations due to COVID-19 have decreased for the second day in a row.

The new figures bring the state’s total coronavirus-associated death count to 1,127. Still, Gov. Ned. Lamont said Sunday that the slight downward tick of hospitalized patients -- 37 fewer patients from the day before -- is a positive sign.

volunteer
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public Radio

A trio of churches in Hartford’s North End have teamed up to provide dinner six days a week to anyone in need. The partnership is one way faith communities are working together to meet basic needs in the midst of the coronavirus.

national guard
Connecticut National Guard / Twitter

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont signed an executive order on Saturday establishing COVID-19 recovery centers in some nursing homes, a move that creates places for patients who’ve been discharged from the hospital to continue to recover. 

family zoom
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

For many Jewish families, staying safe and staying home because of the coronavirus meant that this year's Passover dinner took place using technology.

coronavirus aid program
Courtesy: Raven Blake

For some vulnerable people who need food and resources during the coronavirus pandemic, the solution has come through support from within their own community. A mutual aid network, spearheaded by the racial justice organization CTCORE, has created a way to get food and resources directly to people in need through word-of-mouth and an online form.

BLOOMFIELD, CT - March 25, 2020 -- COVID-19 Marta Hart, medical assistant and x-ray technician, packaging a COVID-19 test at the Urgent Care Center of Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

This post has been updated.

After suggesting earlier in the day that much of the Northeast’s tri-state region could soon be subject to an “enforceable” quarantine, President Donald Trump abruptly reversed course Saturday night.

File: Cybulski Correctional Institution in Enfield.
Connecticut Public Radio

As confirmed coronavirus cases within the state surpassed 1,000, prison reform advocates continued to call on the Lamont administration to do more to address the health and safety of people within the prison system.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

As COVID-19 spreads further across the state, more people who suspect they have the virus are seeking testing. Tests remain in high demand as the state struggles to get residents results in less than a week.

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