Lydia Brown | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Lydia Brown

Senior Producer

Lydia Brown is senior producer of the WNPR news-talk show, Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil.  

Before she became a producer, Lydia interned for WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show and Where We Live

She holds a B.A. in Journalism and Music from New York University.

Ways to Connect

Tim Wolf

A recent report paints a picture of the arts in Greater Hartford, a scene that’s both colorful and rocky.

This hour, we learn about the Greater Hartford Arts Landscape Study, and consider efforts to better support the region’s artists.

We also look back on the early years of hip-hop and breaking (a.k.a. breakdancing) in Connecticut, and hear how some young people are learning and performing these styles today. 

rawpixel.com / Pexels

Whether through religious groups or school-organized activities, Americans have long sought ways to give back to their communities. But has this spirit of altruism faded in recent years?

This hour, we check on the state of volunteering in the U.S. and ask what is being done to motivate more Americans to do good in their spare time. Do you remember the last time you volunteered? We want to hear from you. 

Neil Palmer/CIAT / CIFOR

As fires burn in the Amazon rainforest, we ask: To what extent is deforestation responsible for the flames? Coming up, we check in with climate scientist Dr. Carlos Nobre.

But first, we talk to Scott Wallace about his reporting on illegal logging in the Amazon. What impact does it have on the rainforest? And what is being done to stop it? 

Kwasi Kyei / Wikimedia Commons

For some single adults and couples, the path to adoption can be winding and difficult. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the realities of open adoption in the U.S.

We also learn about legislative efforts to improve adoptees' access to birth records in Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. Have you adopted, or were you adopted yourself? 

Russ / Creative Commons

Standardized tests, application forms, campus visits. The path to college can be a daunting one, especially when you add tuition to the mix. Then, of course, there is the cost of room and board, meal plans, textbooks...feeling stressed yet?

This hour, we tackle the realities of affording a college education, and we also hear from you. Are you the parent of a college-age student? Are you, yourself, working toward a college degree? How has this impacted you financially...emotionally? 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Brandon McGee is a Democratic state representative and petitioning candidate for mayor of his native city of Hartford.

This hour, we sit down with Rep. McGee. We discuss his background and campaign platform, and we also hear from you.

Are you a Hartford resident? What issue, or issues, would you like to hear Rep. McGee address ahead of the Sept. 10 primary? 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Attorneys general from several U.S. states, including Connecticut, have allied in opposition to new Trump administration rules that target immigrants. This hour, we sit down with Connecticut Attorney General William Tong to learn more. 

Daniel Case / Wikimedia Commons

Not only is Charles Ives a revered American composer, but he is also Connecticut's native son. This hour, we take an in-depth look at Ives’ life and profound musical output, and we ask: What is his legacy today? 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, we hear about a months-long investigation into allegations of sexual abuse at local Boys & Girls Clubs.

We also learn about reports of a plan to relocate federal detention hearings from Connecticut to Massachusetts. 

And later we ask: How effective are "red-flag" laws at reducing gun violence in the U.S.? 

Sen. Marilyn Moore / Facebook

This hour, we talk with Democratic State Sen. Marilyn Moore who, in addition to representing the 22nd District, is campaigning for mayor of Bridgeport, Connecticut.

What is her strategy to successfully unseat the city's current mayor, Joe Ganim? We find out and we also hear from you.

Magicpiano / Wikimedia Commons

Abandoned factories tagged with graffiti. Vacant properties marked by broken windows and overgrown lawns. This hour, we consider the impact of urban blight on communities and hear how some local municipalities are working to improve quality of life.

We check in with the cities of Waterbury and Hartford, where significant strides have been made to survey and address blight.

We also talk with Laura Bliss of CityLab and with a housing official in Baltimore. How effective has the Maryland city’s Vacants to Value program been at reducing the number of vacant, blighted properties? We find out. 

yourgenome / CreativeCommons.org

With the last decade of the twentieth century came the first clinical trials for a biotechnology known as gene therapy. Since then, how far has gene therapy come? And how far has it left to go?

This hour, we consider these and other questions, and we also hear from you. Were you or was someone close to you diagnosed with a genetic disease? What thoughts or questions do you have about gene therapy and its ongoing advancement? 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Yale University has a $29 billion endowment, one of the largest in the world. The endowment invests in many things including fossil fuel companies.

This doesn’t sit well with some Yale students and faculty who are concerned about climate change. They’ve called on the school to divest that money from oil, coal, and gas companies. 

Kwasi Kyei / Wikimedia Commons

For some single adults and couples, the path to adoption can be winding and difficult. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the realities of open adoption in the U.S.

We also learn about legislative efforts to improve adoptees' access to birth records in Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. Have you adopted, or were you adopted yourself? 

Tim Wolf

A new report paints a picture of the arts in Greater Hartford, a scene that’s both colorful and rocky.

This hour, we learn about the Greater Hartford Arts Landscape Study, and consider efforts to better support the region’s artists.

We also look back on the early years of hip-hop and breaking (a.k.a. breakdancing) in Connecticut, and hear how some young people are learning and performing these styles today. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Hemp production. It's a growing field in Connecticut... and we mean that in the most literal sense. This hour, we learn about the state's newly seeded hemp industry and consider the challenges and opportunities of farming the plant on local land. 

Favarh

In the Farmington Valley, a nonprofit organization aims to break down silos and build bridges in the community through apartment housing. This hour, we learn about Favarh and its unique initiative to build a more integrated living experience for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Plus, at Quinnipiac University, students can apply to live not in a dorm but with residents at a Masonicare assisted living facility. We learn about the Students in Residence program, and we also hear from you. 

Hartford Courant

On July 6, 1944, the circus came to Connecticut's capital city and erupted into flames. Seventy-five years later, the Hartford Circus Fire is recognized as one of the greatest tragedies in American history.

This hour, 88-year-old survivor Harry Lichtenbaum joins us to share his story. We also talk with the author of a book on the fire and learn about efforts to exhume the bodies of its unidentified victims. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

When it comes to the future of Connecticut's 12 community colleges, a great deal of uncertainty remains, especially on the issue of consolidation.

Something certain, however, is the nearly $1.3 billion operating budget that was approved by the Board of Regents for the state's college and university system last month.

This hour, the president of that system, Mark Ojakian, joins us in-studio to talk more about the budget and what it means for community colleges specifically. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont announced Tuesday his support for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

The news arrived amid reports that the former vice president’s polling lead is shrinking, as California U.S. Senator Kamala Harris' numbers rise. 

U.S. Air Force

"Will America Attack Iran Over One Dead Robot?" That is the question a Daily Beast headline asks in the wake of Iran downing an unmanned U.S. drone in the Gulf. This hour, we get the latest on this evolving story from reporter Adam Rawnsley and consider what it all means for the future of U.S.-Iran relations. 

Magicpiano / Wikimedia Commons

Abandoned factories tagged with graffiti. Vacant properties marked by broken windows and overgrown lawns. This hour, we consider the impact of urban blight on communities and hear how some local municipalities are working to improve quality of life.

We check in with the cities of Waterbury and Hartford, where significant strides have been made to survey and address blight.

We also talk with Laura Bliss of CityLab and with a housing official in Baltimore. How effective has the Maryland city’s Vacants to Value program been at reducing the number of vacant, blighted properties? We find out. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

From the bestselling author of Lilac Girls comes a new novel. It's called Lost Roses and it centers on Eliza Ferriday, a one-time Connecticut resident and mother of esteemed philanthropist Caroline Ferriday.

This hour, author Martha Hall Kelly returns to our studios to talk about the book, and about her experience researching war and revolution in the early 20th century. 

DSNDR-Videolar / Pixabay

What efforts are underway -- both locally and nationally -- to help improve individuals’ access to housing?

This hour, we listen back to a panel moderated by Lucy Nalpathanchil in Hartford recently for the Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness. We hear from policy and advocacy experts.

Later, we also learn about a "Net Zero" affordable housing proposal in the town of Norfolk.

6eo tech / Flickr Creative Commons

Sometimes new technology, like the iPhone, comes to us in flashy, attention-grabbing presentations. But other times, it creeps up and changes our world... without us noticing!

One technology that’s made its way into the headlines is artificial intelligence (AI). For some, those two words might stir up images of Ultron or HAL 9000. But AI's role goes well beyond movies or books. In fact, it's been in the real world for decades. And it's becoming more and more prevalent in our daily lives.

yourgenome / Creative Commons

With the last decade of the twentieth century came the first clinical trials for a biotechnology known as gene therapy. Since then, how far has gene therapy come? And how far has it left to go?

This hour, we consider these and other questions, and we also hear from you. Were you or was someone close to you diagnosed with a genetic disease? What thoughts or questions do you have about gene therapy and its ongoing advancement? 

Bossi / Creative Commons

This hour, we learn about efforts to construct a new casino in Bridgeport, Connecticut. We talk to Hearst Connecticut Media reporter Emilie Munson about a possible deal between the city and the state’s tribes, and consider the implications for MGM, which also has its sights on the Southwest region. 

Plus, the Trump administration has threatened to impose new tariffs on Mexico, raising questions for manufacturers, many of which have already felt the impact of the U.S.’ ongoing trade war with China. We take an in-depth look at this story with The New York Times’ Ben Casselman and a Connecticut-based economist.

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Gift of The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation (2006.05.460) © Georgia O'Keeffe Museum

Though she is perhaps best recognized for her vast and vibrant flower paintings, the contributions of American artist Georgia O’Keeffe extend well beyond these works.

This hour, join us as we tour The Beyond: Georgia O'Keeffe and Contemporary Art, a special exhibition at the New Britain Museum of American Art in New Britain, Connecticut.

Scott Wallace

Journalist and author Scott Wallace has dedicated years to documenting the so-called "unconquered" tribes of South America. This hour, we sit down with Wallace who, in addition to traveling and writing, is a professor of journalism at the University of Connecticut.

We walk along the path that guided Wallace into the thick of the Amazon, and learn about the issues threatening the forest's most isolated people today. 

Kimberly Wilson / YouTube

Maya Angelou, Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks. These are three of the eight Black women whose experiences are recounted in Kimberly Wilson’s “A JOURNEY: Musical One-Woman Show”.

This hour, Wilson, a Westport, Connecticut resident, joins us to talk about her experience writing and performing the show. 

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