Lucy Nalpathanchil | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the Executive Producer and Host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live," a 2018 winner of two national awards from Public Radio News Directors, Inc., or PRNDI.  Lucy and her team were awarded second place in the categories of "Call In Program" and "Interview.

In January 2020, she was named the new Host of "The Wheelhouse."

She's been a public radio journalist for more than 20 years covering everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military. Her reporting has taken her to all sorts of places including a nausea inducing ride aboard a Coast Guard boat in Florida and to Tambacounda, Senegal to talk with women journalists and farmers.

Lucy moved to Connecticut in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She and her husband, Jason, live in Suffield with their two children and a small zoo.

Ways to Connect

Publicdomainpictures.net

The death of a pet can be devastating --yet when you lose an animal companion--you’re sometimes expected to “just get over it.”  This hour, we talk about human attachment to pets. Have you experienced the death of a beloved animal? How comfortable were you talking about your grief with others?

Pxhere

What’s it like being a dad in 2020? On the next Where We Live, we’ll talk about social expectations for fathers as caregivers, and the impact an involved father has on the entire family, emotionally and financially. Are you a father? We want to hear from you.

Mike Mozart / Flickr

How often do you buy new clothing?

Stores like H&M and Forever 21 sell new styles at low prices, making it easy to constantly update your wardrobe. But, this hour: the environmental and social costs of "fast fashion". 

From unsafe garment factories to pollution in rivers, we hear about impacts of the fashion industry from journalist Jasmin Malik Chua.

JJBers / CreativeCommons.org

Anyone who’s spent time outdoors in Connecticut has probably come across a dam or two. The state is home to more than 4,000 dams, a dozen of which were spotlighted in a recent national dam safety investigation by The Associated Press.

This hour, we take an in-depth look at this investigation. What do its findings tell us about the integrity of the nation’s dam infrastructure? And how are states like Connecticut working to address dam safety? 

BoyuZhang1998 / Wikimedia Commons

It’s a busy week in politics. The presidential primary season kicked off in Iowa, and tonight is the President’s State of the Union Address. Meanwhile, the impeachment trial nears its end. This hour, Southern Connecticut State University political scientist Jennifer Hopper joins us.  

Russ / CreativeCommons.org

Standardized tests, application forms, campus visits. The path to college can be a daunting one, especially when you add tuition to the mix. Then, of course, there is the cost of room and board, meal plans, textbooks...feeling stressed yet?

This hour, we tackle the realities of affording a college education, and we also hear from you. Are you the parent of a college-age student? Are you, yourself, working toward a college degree? How has this impacted you financially...emotionally? 

Wood Thrush
Paul J. Fusco

Have you noticed fewer sparrows or warblers flitting about your backyard? Bird populations in North America have been declining for years, but in 2019, the data was particularly grim. Two-thirds of bird species are at risk of extinction due to climate change and urbanization, according to recent studies. What does that mean for Connecticut’s birds?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Wanjiku Gatheru is the daughter of Kenyan immigrants and a first-generation American. Now, the UConn senior has made university history as the school’s first-ever Rhodes Scholar.

The State of Connecticut

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act introduced a new initiative, the Opportunity Zones Program, to spur investment in the nation’s most distressed communities. The state of Connecticut is home to 72 Opportunity Zones. What efforts are being made to attract investors to these regions? This hour, we find out, and we also hear from you. Do you live in or near an Opportunity Zone? 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Sheff v. O’Neill, the landmark desegregation case in Connecticut, has shaped school systems in the greater Hartford region for decades. The state of Connecticut has announced it reached a settlement with the plaintiffs. This hour, we hear more from CT Mirror education reporter Jacqueline Rabe Thomas.

Rob Russell / Wikimedia Commons

Scientists estimate bush fires in Southeastern Australia have killed hundreds of millions of animals. This hour, we talk about the fires’ impact on biodiversity.

And we learn about how climate change is shaping wildfire patterns around the globe. Are severe natural disasters becoming the “new normal”?

Pixabay

If your smartphone screen cracks, do you get it fixed or trade it in for the latest model? Repairing items can be less wasteful, but there are also growing legal challenges for people whose business is to repair technology from smartphones to tractors.

Piqsels.com

Demand for social services in Connecticut has grown in the same decade that’s seen the state struggle to pass balanced budgets. The nonprofit sector has provided more and more of these services but now its facing more pressure, as Americans charitable donations decline and government cutbacks continue.

Pixabay

Deaths related to alcohol have been rising over the past two decades, especially among women.  Today, we look at the impact of alcohol on public health.

And on this day in 1920, Prohibition went into effect around the country, making it illegal to sell alcohol. 100 years after the beginning of this national experiment, we ask: what is a productive policy approach today to dealing with addiction?

Groman123 / Flickr Creative Commons

Most of us enjoy high-speed internet. But in some areas in Connecticut, residents still don’t have broadband access.  A recent court ruling may make it easier for municipalities to provide broadband services.  But is a city or town-run internet service the best way to bridge the ‘digital divide’?

Later, NPR TV critic Eric Deggans joins us with an update on the latest players to enter the streaming market, services like Disney Plus and Apple TV Plus. Just how many streaming services are you willing to pay for?

Pixabay.com

More than 4 million people, around 1 out of 5 undergrads, are raising children today. That’s according to the U.S. Department of Education. These student parents tend to have higher GPAs than traditional students. They’re often older, single, and women of color. But more than half of them leave school without getting a degree. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Leading Democratic presidential candidates meet once again on the debate stage this week.  The stakes are higher than ever for presidential hopefuls, because the first primaries are just around the corner. This hour, we check in with New Hampshire where voters will head to the polls in less than a month.

Is there a better way to narrow candidates for President than the state-by-state primary system? 

And later, a high-profile murder case in Connecticut has led to a proposal to reform the way domestic violence cases are treated in family courts.

Xiaphias / Wikimedia Commons

Spend just a few minutes with young children and you’ll marvel at their imagination. Maybe they’re pretending to be a dragon running a bakery, or they’re coloring the sky purple instead of blue. But somewhere along the way, most of those kids turn into adults who say, “I’m just not a creative person!”

This hour, we ask: how can we foster children’s imaginations? What is creativity, anyway? We talk with psychologists and art teachers to explore what we can do to keep our kids, families, and society inspired by a lifelong curiosity for the arts.

Connie Tsang

When you got to an art gallery, how much of what you see has been made by women? Women artists are underrepresented in most museums. But this year, a special series at the New Britain Museum of American Art will exclusively feature exhibitions by female artists. This hour, we talk with the museum’s director, Min Jung Kim.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

How is Connecticut’s governor doing? Today, we’ll sit down with Governor Ned Lamont, who will have been in office one year this week. We ask him about his priorities for the state in 2020. Got a question for Ned Lamont? Join the conversation on air and on Facebook Live.

U.S. Census Bureau

It's officially 2020, which means you may see a census taker knocking on your door this Spring. 

The decennial census also will be online. This hour, we talk with NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang about efforts to count everyone who lives in the United States, and why it matters.

Life-of-Pix / Pixabay

Walking instead of driving is better for the environment and our health, but in the United States, it’s becoming an increasingly dangerous choice.

Since 2009, the rate of pedestrians killed by a car in Connecticut has more than doubled, even as cars have become safer for drivers and passengers.  How can cities and towns make sure their streets are safe for everyone?

And later: college sports are a billion-dollar industry, but athletes aren’t the ones benefiting the most. We talk about efforts to allow college athletes to make money from the use of their names and images.

Connecticut Historical Society

This summer marks 100 years since the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote in the United States. This hour, we hear about the Connecticut women who fought for suffrage. And: despite the progress seen over the last century, what barriers remain for women’s full participation in the political process today?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

At sixteen years of age, Reginald Dwayne Betts went to prison for carjacking. Decades later, Betts is a celebrated poet and graduate of Yale Law School. But, like many ex-offenders, the consequences of those teenage mistakes have followed him for years.

Ryan Leigh Dostie

Ryan Leigh Dostie is an Iraq War veteran. She joined the U.S. Army to serve her country. But before she was deployed, she experienced violence from one of her own when she was raped by a fellow soldier. 

This hour, we sit down with Dostie. She is a Connecticut resident and author of the new book: Formation: A Woman’s Memoir of Stepping Out of Line.

Recent statistics show sexual assaults in the military have surged in recent years. We talk with a retired colonel about this disturbing trend.

And we want to hear from you. Are you a veteran? How do you think the U.S. military should confront this epidemic of violence in its ranks?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Donald Collins first told his mom he was transgender when he was a senior in high school. His mother wasn’t totally sure what the word transgender even meant. From there, they began a difficult emotional journey as Donald began his transition.

This hour, we sit down with Donald and his mother, Mary Collins. They have written about their experience in the book At the Broken Places: A Mother and Trans Son Pick Up the Pieces. We ask them how they rebuilt their relationship and what lessons they hope to share with other families.

Hartford Courant

On July 6, 1944, the circus came to Connecticut's capital city and erupted into flames. Seventy-five years later, the Hartford Circus Fire is recognized as one of the greatest tragedies in American history.

This hour, 88-year-old survivor Harry Lichtenbaum joins us to share his story. We also talk with the author of a book on the fire and learn about efforts to identify the bodies of its yet unidentified victims. 

Cathy Malin / RiverQuest

They are one of our most recognizable national symbols, but have you ever seen a bald eagle in the wild? This hour we head out of the studio and into the field to see these birds of prey in their natural habitat--right here in Connecticut! We take you along with us on a Winter Wildlife Eagle Cruise down the Connecticut River to view these majestic birds, who nearly faced extinction in this state just a few decades ago.  

Carlos Mejia / Connecticut Public Radio

My parents always had the news on in our house. So I guess I shouldn’t be surprised that I ended up becoming a journalist!

Now years later, I count myself pretty lucky to have a job where I get to talk to people every day on “Where We Live”. With the help of my team, we talk to hundreds of people.

As you settle into the holidays with family, I wanted to share with you our most memorable interviews of 2019.

Susanne Nilsson / Flickr

The holidays are expected to be a season of joy, but annual traditions can highlight the absence of a loved one. This hour, we talk about grief.

We hear from Connecticut residents about how they approach the holidays after losing a family member, and we hear from a grief counselor, too. How should you respond to the people around you who are grieving?

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