Lily Tyson | Connecticut Public Radio
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Lily Tyson

NENC/NEXT Producer

Lily is the producer of NEXT for the New England News Collaborative. She grew up in Connecticut, and has a B.A. in Russian and Peace and Conflict Studies from Swarthmore College. She formerly worked as a freelance producer for WBUR’s daily talk show, Radio Boston.

Lily Tyson / Connecticut Public Radio

In 1953 American illustrator Norman Rockwell moved from Arlington, Vermont, to the small town of Stockbridge, Massachusetts, on the Western edge of the Berkshires. While there, Rockwell developed a relationship with a prominent psychotherapist who came to influence the artist’s work. Their relationship is the subject of a new exhibit at the Norman Rockwell Museum: “Inspired: Norman Rockwell and Erik Erikson.” 

Jessse Yuen / Flickr, Creative Commons

In early 2017, The New York Times uncovered a program at the Defense Department which investigated unidentified flying objects. Then, at the end of May, the reporters published another article, getting navy pilots to talk on the record about their encounters with unidentified flying objects. 

Rusty Clark / Flickr, Creative Commons

Fyre Festival, Theranos, Anna Delvey, the college admissions scandal... the list goes on. And whether explored on the news or as a book, podcast, documentary or feature film, consumers can't seem to get enough of this 'scamtent.'

 

This hour, we'll talk about scams and scammers, and discuss why we as a culture can't seem to look away.

Jem Stone / Flickr/Creative Commons

Between November of 2016 and June of 2018, the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) saw it's membership jump from 5,000 to over 40,000

This hour we'll explore what socialism means today, and why the ideology is having a resurgence. Plus, why are more young people getting involved in the movement? 

Carlos Mejia / New England News Collaborative

Tucked away in the northwest corner of Connecticut, just a few miles from the Massachusetts border, stands the New England Accordion Connection and Museum Company. The museum houses over 600 accordions, thousands of pages of sheet music, and a jukebox filled with hours of accordion music.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This week, Will Leitch, from New York Magazine, wrote that "The Era of the Old Athlete is Over." Is it? And what does this mean for the future of sports?