John Dankosky | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

John Dankosky

Executive Editor, NENC

John is Executive Editor of the New England News Collaborative, an eight-station consortium of public media newsrooms. He is also the host of NEXT, a weekly program about New England, and appears weekly on The Wheelhouse, WNPR's news roundtable program.

Previously, he was Vice President of News for CPBN, and Host of Where We Live,  twice recognized by PRNDI as America’s best public radio call-in show. You can also hear him as the regular fill-in host for the PRI program Science Friday in New York. He has worked as an editor at NPR in Washington, and reported for NPR and other national outlets on a variety of subjects.

As an editor, he has won national awards for his documentary work, and regularly works with NPR and member stations on efforts to collaborate in the public media system. As an instructor, John has held a chair in journalism and communications at Central Connecticut State University and been an adjunct professor at Quinnipiac University. He is also a regular moderator for political debates and moderated conversations at The Connecticut Forum , the Mark Twain House and Museum, The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, The World Affairs Council of Connecticut and The Litchfield Jazz Festival.

John began his radio career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh, his hometown.

Ways to Connect

Chion Wolf

Economists worry about a “double-dip” recession as the state and federal governments try to create jobs.  

We’re live today at the Connecticut Science Center for one of our quarterly Small Business Breakfasts.  It’s done in conjunction with our Small Business Project, where we look at how entrepreneurs are faring in this economy.

Fordham University

Marshall McLuhan was the prophet of today’s digital world.  This year, he would have turned 100.  

Try on, for example, this passage from the beginning of McLuhan’s most widely read work, “The Medium is the Massage.”

Youth instinctively understands the present environment – the electric drama. It lives mythically and in depth. This is the reason for the great alienation between generations. Wars, revolutions, civil uprisings are interfaces within the new environments created by electric informational media.

hweiling, creative commons

The numbers don’t do justice to the scope of Alzheimers Disease.

The Connecticut Health Investigative Team's senior writer Lisa Chedekel published a report on Massachusetts-based veterans who say they were exposed to Agent Orange in the United States. Read her article here.

Donna Brown (Flickr Creative Commons)

The new Chairman of the Connecticut Republican Party, Jerry Labriola joins us to discuss state politics, Democrats and Connecticut's role in the 2012 Republican presidential primary.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A speech by the president of the United State about creating jobs for millions of Americans has been preempted by a debate between republicans vying for his job.

Yes, that’s where we are in America right now. But thank God...at least President Obama was nice enough to schedule his important announcement at a time that wouldn’t upset football fans.

MiiiSH, Creative Commons

Steve Jobs’ departure from Apple has people talking about what makes a great business leader.

You’d have thought the pope or the president was stepping down.  Such was the adulation laid on the outgoing leader - and such was the worry.  Can he be replaced?  

Jobs made such an impact at Apple not because he’s good at computers, but because he’s been able to transform a successful business several times through the force of personality, his vision and charisma.

Chion Wolf

Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman might be the most well-known observer of the Sabbath in American life.

Lieberman has written a new memoir called “The Gift of Rest: Rediscovering the Beauty of the Sabbath.” He takes you through a magical place he visits each Friday night at sundown called “Shabbatland.” But it’s not just a place with no work, no car, no TV. It provides for him a place of peace, conversation and family.

Photo by Chion Wolf

For 25 years, Ted Koppel came into America’s living rooms as the anchor of Nightline.

Photos by Chion Wolf

They’re both Democrats, but Jonathan Pelto and Patrick Scully don’t exactly see eye-to-eye.

Their differences largely stem from the recently ratified labor concessions deal.

Pelto - a progressive former state lawmaker - was disappointed in Governor Malloy’s handling of the deal and said he wanted his 2010 vote back.

stevendepolo, flickr

Last weeky we did a whole show about sugar.  We talked to author Gary Taubes who wrote an article for New York Times titled “Is Sugar Toxic?” After talking with him awhile, it seems as though he and the scientists he quoted had made a conclusion.  Their answer is “yes.”  

But we had a few listeners who weren't happy with Taubes’ claims. Today we get a response from The Sugar Association.

Photo by Avinash Kunnath (Flickr)

We talk with Hartford Courant columnist Jeff Jacobs about the “resignation” of UConn athletic director Jeff Hathaway. He is leaving the post he's had since 2003. Although the athletics program has enjoyed success, Hathaway was criticized for low attendance and fundraising.

The move may indicate new President Susan Herbst's commitment to revamping the school's athletic program. Jacobs praised Herbst's handling of the situation:

Bates on Libya

Aug 23, 2011
Chion Wolf

People around the world are watching the ongoing battle for control of Libya.  Yesterday, President Obama - like most observers - seemed ready to say that rebel forces had taken control of the country, displacing Muammar Gadhafi.

Scared Sick

Aug 19, 2011

All the news about health and medicine we’re exposed to might lead some to healthier lifestyles...but to some people, all this information can cause a problem.

For hypochondriacs, a little knowledge about health and medicine can lead to a fear of everything that can possibly go wrong with their bodies.

Cheating Schools

Aug 18, 2011
albertogp123

The state is investigating teachers and staff at a Waterbury elementary school about suspected cheating on the 2011 Connecticut Mastery Tests.

This follows widespread cheating scandals uncovered in the District of Columbia, Baltimore and Atlanta…just this year.  In a story this month, the magazine Education Week put it this way:

“As long as test scores are used in any field to make decisions on rewards or punishments, including for schools or educators, a small percentage of people will be willing to bend the rules - or break them.”

Photo by Mykl Roventine (Flickr)

How much sugar do you eat? The U.S.D.A. estimates the average American consumes more than 3,500 pounds of sugar in their lifetime.

Sugar seems to be in or on everything. Cereal, coffee, yogurt, candy, ketchup and of course...soda. It certainly affects our health, and is seen as the main culprit in “epidemics” of obesity and diabetes.

But sugar has also impacted the course of history, changed the fate of empires, and affected millions.

Photos by Thomas MacMillan (New Haven Independent)

In 1994, John DeStefano took over as mayor of New Haven and has held the position ever since.

Tonight, with the primary just over a month away, DeStefano squares off in a debate with four Democratic opponents.

juliejordanscott

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the American Civil War, and the state of Connecticut is paying tribute.

Earlier this year, we talked a bit about Connecticut’s civil war history - and got a big response.  Including from our friend, author and historian Bill Hosley.  

Office of Policy and Management Secretary Ben Barnes
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Income tax increases are being felt in some paychecks while tax breaks are going out to some big companies.

Those tax increases are being felt mostly by Connecticut’s wealthiest residents...and are showing up in paychecks now.  It’s an issue of “fairness” according to some - but another look at the numbers shows the state’s revenue stream is more “volatile” because of a dependence on the rich.

The Media Fast

Aug 4, 2011
youngthousands, creative commons

TwitterGoogleFacebookGmailGchatFlickerLinkediniPhoneiPad....ahhhhergh!  I think it might be time for a break. This week, we've been talking about technology and the internet, and how we consume it.  But what happens when it consumes us?

Tom Cooper’s Fast Media/Media Fast looks at “how to clear your mind and invigorate your life in an age of media overload.” But is this actually possible in this media saturated world?

puuikibeach, creative commons

The number of shark attacks reported worldwide increased 25% in 2010.

That sounds scary!  Until you realize that the worldwide total is 79.  And despite an increase in shark sightings, the shark population is actually declining.

Today, where we live, while the Discovery Channel has their beloved Shark Week, we’re taking a small bite out of the action with our own shark day.

Google's World

Aug 2, 2011
Photo by Robert Scoble (Flickr)

What company became so successful that its name is now used as a verb? If you’re not sure, well, maybe you should Google it.

Google started as a search engine but it has grown to include email, calendars, documents, maps, even mobile operating systems.

Online Civility

Aug 1, 2011
Photo by Basheer Tome (Flickr)

We used to discuss the news around the water cooler, at the barbershop and sometimes at dinner. Now, we can get right online and tell people how we REALLY feel...

Is there anyplace more cringe-worthy than the “comments section” of a news website?

The intentions were good: providing readers with a place to discuss the stories.

But all too frequently there’s name-calling and hateful comments, all disguised by anonymous “handles.”

Mike Poresky

Yesterday, Republicans who control the house finally addressed the issue that's been gripping the nation: Naming Post Offices.

Yes, when it became clear that House Speaker John Boehner's two-stage solution to avert the debt crisis was not going to get enough votes from within his caucus, the House quickly turned to the important task of naming the Post Offices in Peoria and Pasadena.   

Book Cover Design by Nicholas Blechman

We all have junk...maybe too much. You know, the stuff we just don’t use that much. But what if there was a way to make better use of it?

For instance, you use a lawn mower once every few weeks. Your weed-whacker might get used once a year. So why spend hundreds of dollars on something that only occasionally gets used?

That’s one of the questions being asked by people taking part in what is being called “Collaborative Consumption.” Why buy something when you can swap, share, barter, trade or rent for it instead?

William Tong

Jul 26, 2011
Chion Wolf / WNPR

What do you get when a little-known candidate raises more than a half-million dollars in the first months of a run for Senate?  Could it be “tong fever"?

Well, at least that’s what Colin McEnroe called it.  The condition is named after William Tong, who in 2006, became the first Asian American elected to a state office in Connecticut.  

Chion Wolf / WNPR

With a 12-year career on Wall Street before coming to Congress, Jim Himes has become a “go-to” guy on questions about the debt ceiling.

The 4th district congressman has been making the rounds of cable talk shows, warning about the coming crisis if Congress doesn’t act to raise the debt ceiling.

He told the Connecticut Mirror that he’s trying to “debunk the baloney” that he says he hears coming from the likes of Tea Party Presidential Candidate Michele Bachman.

The Book 2.0

Jul 21, 2011
goXunuReviews, Creative Commons

Borders Books reached its height in 2005 with more than 1,200 bookstores around the world. In a few weeks, there will be no more.

Chion Wolf

Susan Bysiewicz is hoping to turn her name recognition and long political career in Connecticut into a spot in the US Senate. 

Bysiewicz was Connecticut’s popular Secretary of the State, when she decided to give up that job to run for Governor.  Then, in the first round of the bizarre political shakeup of 2010, she left that race while in the lead to run for the Attorney General’s job, being vacated by now Senator Richard Blumenthal.

Baseball Legends

Jul 19, 2011
Courtesy of Boston Public Library

Today,  a baseball celebration - about heroes and the places where they play.  We’ll talk with the author of a new oral history of Fenway Park; with the organizers of a Hartford Little League trying to stay afloat; and hear a classic public radio documentary about the real homerun champion.

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