Howard Weiss-Tisman | Connecticut Public Radio
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Howard Weiss-Tisman

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's southern Vermont correspondent.

Vermonters who took part in the new VPR-Vermont PBS Rural Life Survey said that traveling distance was one reason why they had trouble getting the health care they needed. Some health experts say telehealth services could be one way to better serve people in rural areas that need health care.

A group of Upper Valley residents has taken up the call to “bring the cows, back” to Norwich Farm.

Across Vermont, organizations are experimenting with new models to combat homelessness. In some communities they're being welcomed, but in others, there's been push back.

Artie Aiken used to have stomach problems. During World War II, he served on bases in Connecticut and Texas instead of going overseas. When he got back to Vermont, a doctor prescribed goat milk – and things were never the same.

Local concern over large deposits of silt in two Deerfield Valley rivers has forced Mount Snow to call a public hearing on the issue.

A Brattleboro nonprofit that promotes sustainable building design says green buildings should be able to prove that they can stand up to natural disasters, especially those associated with climate change.

The Vermont Council on Rural Development wants the state to become a leader in growing the green economy as scientists, governments and entrepreneurs confront the effects of climate change.

The council is going around the state to gather input on these issues, and held a forum in Brattleboro.

Doreen Cooney has owned the Deerfield Valley Inn in West Dover for 17 years and she is ready to try something new.

She put the property on the market last year, and after a pending deal with a potential buyer fell through she decided she would try something different to help her get out of the bed and breakfast business:

Cooney wants to give away the historic Deerfield Valley Inn.

You can't miss the new Nicole Goodner MacFarlane Center when you enter Landmark College. 

The brand new 28,500 square-foot building dominates the view as you drive onto the Putney campus.

Michelle Bower is chair of the mathematics and computer science department and she says the school's new science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM center, makes a statement about Landmark's focus on research and science.