Harriet Jones | Connecticut Public Radio
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Harriet Jones

Managing Editor

Harriet Jones is Managing Editor for WNPR, overseeing the coverage of daily stories from our busy newsroom.

She also reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Luke Franzen/iStock / Thinkstock

Criminal justice reform advocates are urging people who have prior convictions to lobby lawmakers over the Clean Slate bill. The measure -- currently awaiting action in the state senate -- would erase the record of people with misdemeanors after a set period of time. It would also allow a path towards expungement for certain felonies. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Stop & Shop workers will be back on the job Monday morning after unions and management at the grocery chain announced Sunday evening that they had reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract. The announcement comes after a strike lasting 11 days, that affected 240 stores in Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Sen. Richard Blumenthal said it’s not over yet – it’s only the beginning of a new chapter.

Jesse Costa / WBUR

As the Stop & Shop strike stretches out past one week, some are starting to calculate its wider effect on the economy. Meanwhile, many of the striking workers themselves are waiting to hear if they have a chance to collect unemployment benefits.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Workers clustered together at the two entrances to the Stop & Shop store in East Hartford, holding signs in the air and chanting, "Better contract, better lives. Better contract, better lives!"

The store's employees were among unionized workers at Stop & Shop stores across Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island who walked off the job Thursday, after weeks of tense contract negotiations with the supermarket chain that have so far failed to yield a new contract.

Washington State Dept. of Transportation/flickr creative commons

After months of uncertainty the debate over tolls finally has some numbers to work with. Wednesday, the Lamont administration unveiled the plan they'd put in place -- if they can get the legislature to agree.

East Hartford Superintendent Nathan Quesnel speaks at the announcement Friday April 5, watched by Governor Ned Lamont and Ray and Barbara Dalio.
Adam Hushin / Connecticut Public Radio

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio and his wife Barbara are making a $100 million donation to Connecticut Public Schools. It’s part of what the state hopes will be a $300 million public private partnership. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Many Connecticut lawmakers have said that if the state legalizes cannabis, it would be only right to expunge the records of state residents who have cannabis-related convictions. But that may be easier said than done.

Sage Ross / Flickr

Connecticut-based consumer rights advocate Ralph Nader lost his grand-niece in the recent crash of a Boeing 737 Max jet in Ethiopia. Now he’s gunning for the planemaker and federal safety regulators who allowed the aircraft to be certified. 

Cliff Owen / Associated Press

Several members of Connecticut's congressional delegation say special counsel Robert Mueller’s report should be released in full to the public.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut is one step closer to bringing tolls back to the state. The legislature's Transportation Committee voted in favor of moving forward three bills related to tolling, including Governor Ned Lamont's plan that would put tolls on interstates 91, 95 and 84, as well as portions of Route 15. 

In this October 1998 file photo, Mayor Vincent "Buddy" Cianci Jr., poses along in front of the city's skyline in Providence, R.I. Cianci, who served a total of 21 years as mayor, was twice driven from office due to felony convictions.
Matt York / Associated Press

The larger-than-life former mayor of Providence Buddy Cianci will be reincarnated on stage in his home city later this year, as Trinity Rep stages a new play, The Prince of Providence

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

In a wide-ranging interview with Connecticut Public Radio, Governor Ned Lamont Monday touted some of his policy and personnel changes in the crucial areas of transportation and economic development.

Criminal Justice Division

A former top lawyer for the state Republican party has been charged with stealing more than a quarter of a million dollars from a political action committee fund. Michael Cronin, who was treasurer of the fund, and a trusted employee of the party for years, first confessed in December that he had been taking cash. 

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Senator Richard Blumenthal says that he will oppose the confirmation of William Barr to be the next attorney general. Blumenthal, who serves on the Senate Judiciary Committee, met with Barr Monday before announcing his decision. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The state’s new chief justice, Richard Robinson, says he’d like to improve the image of the state Supreme Court -- but at the same time he’s concerned about the effects of deep budget cuts on the whole judicial branch. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont has laid to rest a long controversy over land in the eastern half of Connecticut. He declared that he’s scrapping plans to build a new state police firearms training facility in the town of Griswold.

Archbishop Leonard P. Blair speaks during his Mass of Installation at the Cathedral of Saint Joseph in Hartford, Conn., on Monday, Dec. 16. 2013.
Fred Beckham / Associated Press

The Catholic Archdiocese of Hartford has released the names of 48 priests it says have been credibly accused of sexual abuse. It is also appointing a retired state judge to review all of its personnel files back to the 1950s.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Democrats in the Connecticut General Assembly look like they’ll make early voting a signature issue this session. They’re introducing legislation seeking a referendum on an amendment to the state’s constitution. 

Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Governor Ned Lamont has announced a partnership with local banks that will see federal workers in Connecticut offered interest-free loans to help them during the government shutdown. 

JJBers / Creative Commons

The partial government shutdown is taking its toll on furloughed employees and those who are forced to work without pay at Bradley International Airport. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Coast Guard families are enduring hardships as active duty personnel and civilian employees live without pay during the government shutdown.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s insurance industry has been taking stock of its year, and a new report says the state should still pride itself on being the insurance capital of the world.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut will have a new governor Wednesday. Ned Lamont takes over from his fellow Democrat Dannel Malloy as he takes the oath of office in a ceremony at the State Armory. 

Neena Satija

Senator Richard Blumenthal has condemned Metro-North and many other railroads for failing to implement Positive Train Control safety technology. Only four of more than 40 railroads have installed the technology which can control train speeds and prevent collisions and derailments in the event of human error. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Dannel Malloy faced many challenges in his eight year tenure. While the state budget crisis may have grabbed the headlines, other structural issues with Connecticut’s economy also consumed his attention. One of the biggest of these - the skills gap. 

Artist Bri Dill from South Windsor creates a painting at the grand opening of Infosys' Hartford innovation hub.
Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Technology consulting company Infosys has formally cut the ribbon on its new innovation hub in Hartford. The center, housed in Hartford’s Goodwin Square building, will be one of four that the Indian company is creating around the U.S. 

Sam Cox / Creative Commons

Utility regulators in Connecticut have issued a draft decision that might block a major water company takeover. The deal would see Connecticut Water Service bought out by a California company.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

The chief counsel to the state Senate Republicans has been fired after admitting misappropriating tens of thousands of dollars from an election expenses account. Michael Cronin was confronted Monday by the caucus leader, state Senator Len Fasano, after vendors complained of unpaid bills, and a check was bounced.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Farmington-based conglomerate United Technologies has announced it will break itself up into three separate companies. The breakup, which had been signaled for months, follows the closing of a massive deal to buy aerospace systems maker Rockwell Collins.

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