Harriet Jones | Connecticut Public Radio
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Harriet Jones

Managing Editor

Harriet Jones is Managing Editor for Connecticut Public Radio, overseeing the coverage of daily stories from our busy newsroom.

As a reporter she's covered such diverse issues as the opioid crisis, immigration policy, homelessness, workforce development and income inequality.

In 2011, she created the station's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

 

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Hanging Hills Brewery
Adam Hushin/Connecticut Public

One industry that’s positively flourished in Connecticut in the last decade or so is small craft breweries. As of January, more than 100 were open up and down the state.

But with many so dependent on now-shuttered taprooms, and on their partnerships with restaurants, they’re in the eye of the economic storm, as coronavirus takes its toll.

South Park Inn
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio

As state and local governments grapple with how to keep people safe, the threat of coronavirus looms larger for people in vulnerable situations.

Perhaps none more so than people who are experiencing homelessness, who -- by definition -- cannot “stay safe; stay home,” as Gov. Ned Lamont’s new slogan has it.

cleaning service
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio

While some businesses have asked their staff to work from home, other jobs can’t be done remotely. Among the most important as the nation faces a pandemic infection -- cleaning.

But many people who clean for a living say they don’t feel safe carrying out their jobs right now.

cash money
Colin Watts / Unsplash

Connecticut’s financial institutions are moving to reassure customers about their accounts, as the state’s economy creaks under the strain of the coronavirus crisis

Brandon Lynch

It’s been a whiplash week for many people in Connecticut’s service industry. None more so than restaurant servers and bartenders, many of whom were laid off this week without warning, as Gov. Ned Lamont ordered eateries to move to takeout-only service.

governor ned lamont
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont has joined with the governors of New York and New Jersey in announcing that restaurants and bars that serve food in the tri-state area will be required to move to delivery or takeout service only. The measure, which took effect at 8 p.m. Monday, is intended to enforce social distancing, as the coronavirus crisis continues to intensify.

David Butler II / CPTV Sports

The fallout from the spread of the coronavirus has hit high school sports in the state. The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference has notified schools that it has canceled the state championships for all winter sports. 

Governor Ned Lamont at the 2020 State of the State address
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont delivered his second State of the State address to the General Assembly on Wednesday, the opening day of this year’s short legislative session.

The reintroduction of the governor’s signature tolling initiative -- now entering its second year at the top of the administration’s wish list -- got only a passing mention in the speech, with Lamont urging legislators to a quick decision on his new transportation funding bill.

President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020.
Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

It was a State of the Union speech that some Democratic lawmakers decided not to attend, in protest at President Donald Trump’s conduct. Others who were in the chamber for the address left before the end, saying that the president lied.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Fotis Dulos has been hospitalized in critical condition, according to law enforcement officials, after being found unresponsive at his Farmington home Tuesday.

In a joint news conference, Connecticut State Police and Farmington police said Dulos was being treated for carbon monoxide poisoning. Dulos had been under house arrest awaiting trial for the murder of his estranged wife, Jennifer Farber Dulos. 

Hyde Campaign

Lev Parnas, a former associate of Rudy Giuliani, said he dismissed information given to him by Robert Hyde, a Republican candidate for Congress in Connecticut's 5th District. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The attorney for a Hartford woman recently released from immigration detention says she’s received notice that federal homeland security officials intend to appeal a recent decision in her client’s favor. 

Connecticut State Police officers lead Fotis Dulos, center, from the State Police barracks to a waiting car Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020, in Bridgeport, Conn., after he was arrested at his home in Farmington. He faces charges he murdered his estranged wife Jenni
Chris Ehrmann / Associated Press

Fotis Dulos, the estranged husband of Jennifer Farber Dulos, who has been missing for months, has been charged with her murder.

The New Canaan woman went missing after dropping her children at school in May of 2019. Her body has never been found.

Paul Bass / New Haven Independent

Connecticut continues to react to escalating tensions between the United States and Iran sparked by the killing of a senior Iranian general by American forces.

Sujata Srinivasan

Predicting the direction of the economy is a notoriously tricky business, and it may be even more difficult than usual as we look further into 2020. That’s because the year ahead is full of political and financial uncertainty -- both for Connecticut and for the nation. Connecticut Public gathered thoughts and predictions from some of the state’s foremost economic thinkers.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Tax season is upon us, and for low- and moderate-income filers, free help is at hand. 

VITA sites will spring up beginning this week at libraries, community centers and schools around the state. VITA stands for Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, and it’s just what it sounds like: volunteer preparers, trained by the IRS, who will do your taxes on the spot -- for free.

Connecticut’s two Democratic U.S. senators condemned the killing of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani in a U.S. drone strike at Baghdad Airport Thursday night.

Sens. Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy believe the strike may lead to reprisals from Iran.

Murphy called the operation  an “act of war” and said he thinks the military leader will now be seen as a martyr.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Lawmakers and state leaders joined members of the Jewish community at a vigil in West Hartford Monday evening, in solidarity with the victims of a stabbing attack in New York.

House Television via AP

All five of Connecticut’s representatives in the U.S. House voted to impeach Donald Trump in an historic session Wednesday. Only one, the 4th District’s Jim Himes, gave remarks on the floor before the vote.

Himes, who has been closely involved in the impeachment process as a key member of the House Intelligence Committee, said it is time to hold the president to account.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Several members of Connecticut’s congressional delegation were quick to endorse the articles of impeachment unveiled Tuesday morning by the leadership of the Democratic party. Describing President Donald Trump’s behavior as “gangsterlike,” Rep. Jim Himes said he feels particularly strongly about the second article, obstruction of Congress.

Courtesy: WFSB

The death of longtime news anchor Denise D’Ascenzo is being felt across the state, and many of her colleagues continue to pay tribute to her work and her life. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The federal Board of Immigration Appeals has indicated it will now recognize pardons issued by the state of Connecticut, according to the attorney for a Hartford woman previously threatened with deportation. 

DavidsonScott15 / Creative Commons

Campaigners against domestic violence say the incident in Watertown, in which two teenagers were shot to death by their mother’s boyfriend, represents a too-common trend.

Watertown police say that 16-year-old Sterling Jette Jr. and 15-year-old Della Jette were killed Tuesday night by Paul Ferguson -- who then died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s first chief manufacturing officer says one issue dominates his agenda as he takes up his new post: finding enough skilled workers to fill thousands of open positions in the industry.

Ryan Martins / Connecticut Public Radio

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a case that could be pivotal for hundreds of thousands of young people covered by the DACA program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont believes the state can no longer “kick the can down the road” when it comes to funding transportation in Connecticut.

Lamont and his administration will now move forward with a plan called CT2030 that they hope will improve the state’s transportation infrastructure and significantly cut down the time it takes the average commuter to get around the state.

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

A New Haven woman previously under threat of deportation to her native Bangladesh has been granted asylum in the United States, according to her son. 

Ron Dauphin / Flickr Creative Commons

The number of Eversource customers disconnected for nonpayment has doubled in the past four years. In 2018, the company shut off power 80,700 times.

Those numbers were the backdrop to a hearing Friday before the Public Utilities Regulatory Authority in Hartford.

Declan McEnroe / Connecticut Public Radio

Tens of thousands of homes in Connecticut lost power Thursday night as severe thunderstorms swept the eastern seaboard. Downed trees and power lines closed roads in cities and towns across the state, and dozens of school districts have delayed starts or canceled classes Friday.

Courtesy: Governor's Office

Cross-state cooperation on marijuana and on vaping issues headlined the latest meeting between the governors of Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts. Ned Lamont, Gina Raimondo and Charlie Baker met in Providence Thursday.

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