Colin Dwyer | Connecticut Public Radio
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Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the News Desk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

More than two dozen people are dead after an attack Wednesday on a Sikh place of worship in Kabul. The assault on the temple in the Afghan capital left at least 25 people dead, another eight wounded and dozens more in need of rescue, according to the country's Ministry of Interior.

A New Jersey man has been charged with making terroristic threats after allegedly coughing in the direction of a local supermarket employee and claiming he suffered from the coronavirus. The state's attorney general, Gurbir Grewal, announced the charges against George Falcone on Tuesday.

Here's how his office explains what happened at a Wegmans supermarket on Sunday evening:

In a bid to stem the tide of the coronavirus, India has declared the world's largest stay-at-home order yet in the fight against the global pandemic.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi declared a 21-day lockdown during an address to the country Tuesday, instructing its more than 1.3 billion residents to stay right where they are, beginning at midnight Tuesday night.

The Norwegian Jewel set out from Australia late last month on a jaunt through the South Pacific. Now, just one day from its journey's original end date, the cruise ship has found itself turned away from multiple ports, and its more than 2,000 passengers are beginning to fear there may not be an end in sight.

Come Friday, few places will show the effects of the coronavirus more vividly than mosques across the world — not so much for what will be there, as what won't: Friday prayers have been curtailed or outright suspended in more than a dozen majority-Muslim countries across the world.

The list of countries to close mosques to mass gatherings or issue widespread bans includes Turkey and Lebanon, Iraq and Egypt, Jordan and Malaysia — along with a growing collection of others.

Australia and New Zealand are shutting their doors to foreigners.

In separate announcements issued Friday, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said that visitors who are not residents or citizens of their respective countries will soon be turned away at the border — beginning Friday night in Australia, and even sooner in New Zealand.

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

The U.S. hit a grim milestone in its fight against the coronavirus, as the number of confirmed cases pushed past the 10,000 mark. As of Thursday afternoon, officials reported more than 10,750 confirmed cases of the COVID-19 viral disease — and over 150 deaths.

A pair of U.S. Navy hospital ships will be deployed to New York and on the West Coast, where medical workers are anxiously expecting a major influx of patients as the coronavirus spreads.

President Trump announced the plans for deployment during a news conference Wednesday, and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo confirmed that he expects one of those ships — the USNS Comfort — to take up a position in New York Harbor, adjacent to New York City.

The massive music festival based in Manchester, Tenn., has joined the host of major events that have postponed their events due to the coronavirus. Organizers announced the delay Wednesday, saying they plan to reschedule the four-day festival to Sept. 24-27, from its original dates in late June.

"Please continue to radiate positivity through this uncharted time in our world," organizers said on the festival's website, adding that they look forward to seeing attendees still this coming fall.

In-person classes have come to an abrupt end for students across Kansas.

Gov. Laura Kelly announced that she has ordered school buildings K-12 to be closed for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year, citing fears about the spread of the coronavirus disease COVID-19 and the "unprecedented emergency" it presents.

Updated at 2:27 p.m. ET

A pair of U.S. Navy hospital ships will be deployed to New York and the West Coast, where medical workers are anxiously expecting a major influx of patients as the coronavirus spreads.

The coronavirus has not been kind to supplies of toilet paper. Along with the obvious items, such as hand sanitizer and other disinfectants, the rolls of tissue have been increasingly hard to find at local markets, as people stock up to hunker down during the global pandemic.

But please, for goodness' sake, don't panic if you run out.

That, at least, is the earnest request of the police department in Newport, Ore.

Updated at 7:38 p.m. ET

Two weeks after the U.S. told a handful of Chinese state media entities to slash their U.S.-based staff, Beijing has retaliated with an order of its own: Certain U.S. nationals working with The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post have been banned from working in China.

Updated at 11:02 a.m. ET

It is the end of an era in New England.

Tom Brady, the quarterback who led the Patriots to six Super Bowl wins in the past two decades, including one just last year, has announced that he is leaving the franchise. Brady said farewell in a statement tweeted Tuesday, saying, "I don't know what the future holds but it is time for me to open a new stage for my life and career."

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Updated at 8:38 p.m. ET

The U.S. and countries around the world continued to adapt to the spreading coronavirus pandemic by imposing new restrictions Saturday, as the virus upended travel plans, pushed back elections and forced major companies to adapt.

In Washington, the Trump administration said Saturday that the U.S. would extend the current ban on travel from Europe to include the U.K. and Ireland, effective midnight Monday.

Updated at 1:53 p.m. ET

Harvey Weinstein has been sentenced to 23 years in prison. Judge James Burke handed down the decision in a Manhattan courtroom on Wednesday as the disgraced movie mogul watched, flanked by his legal team.

Updated at 6:03 a.m. ET Sunday

The government of Italy has imposed mass restrictions across its northern region, limiting the movement of more than 16 million people, as it fights to control the coronavirus outbreak there.

The measure affects the entire Lombardy region, along with its capital, Milan, as well as the city of Venice. The area includes about a quarter of Italy's population.

The Italian Civil Protection Department reported a total of 5,883 COVID-19 cases as of Saturday evening, with 233 deaths from the illness.

President Trump touched down Friday in Tennessee, where residents are still sorting through wreckage and seeking to rebuild after a series of deadly tornadoes blew through the state earlier this week.

A federal appeals court has decided to block the Trump administration's "Remain in Mexico" plan in two states along the U.S. border, following back-and-forth rulings over the program.

In its order late Wednesday, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco said that next week the administration will have to stop making asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for the U.S. to process their claims, but that the court ban applies only to areas in its jurisdiction, Arizona and California.

Updated 5:50 p.m. ET

Just days after the U.S. and Taliban announced the terms of a deal lauded as a foundation for peace, Afghanistan is once more embroiled in deadly violence.

The U.K. Court of Appeal dealt has dealt climate activists a big legal win, blocking plans for the addition of a third runway at London's Heathrow Airport, one of the busiest international hubs in the world. In its judgment Thursday, the three-justice panel concluded that the plans failed to satisfy the government's stated commitments on combating climate change.

Editor's note: This report includes graphic descriptions of sexual assault accusations.

Updated at 3:42 p.m. ET

A Manhattan jury has found Harvey Weinstein guilty of rape and sexual abuse but acquitted him of the most serious charges, capping one of the most closely watched trials of the #MeToo era. The mixed verdict means the former Hollywood producer will likely spend time in prison.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

"America loves India, America respects India, and America will always be faithful and loyal friends to the Indian people," President Trump told a cheering crowd of more than 100,000 people in India's huge Motera cricket stadium on Monday.

"From this day on, India will always hold a very special place in our hearts," Trump said. He referred to his host, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, as "a man I am proud to call my true friend."

Hope has resurfaced in South Sudan, where two rival leaders shared a landmark gesture Saturday after years of bitter fighting.

Updated at 12:23 p.m. ET, Feb. 25

The number of new coronavirus cases in South Korea had a major spike over the weekend.

By Sunday, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the total number of confirmed cases in the country rose to 556.

As of Tuesday, the number of confirmed cases was just 31.

More than two decades after it went missing, a ceremonial crown dating back to the 18th century has found its way home to Ethiopia. The country's prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, received the glistening artifact at a ceremony Thursday in Addis Ababa, in a triumphant end to a twisty saga that transcends national borders.

It has been just over 78 years since President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order authorizing the internment of Japanese Americans.

Now, in a unanimous vote, the California Assembly has apologized for the role the state played in rounding up about 120,000 people – mainly U.S. citizens – and moving them into 10 camps, including two in California.

Just five books remain in the running for the Aspen Words Literary Prize, an award with one major goal in mind: to reward and recognize writers who have brought the powers of fiction to bear on the major social issues of our time — such as economic inequality, ecological crisis, immigration and other subjects thick with thorns.

Here are the books that have made this year's shortlist:

  • Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn
  • Lost Children Archive, by Valeria Luiselli
  • Lot, by Bryan Washington

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