WNPR

Chion Wolf

Technical Producer/Announcer/Photographer

Chion Wolf is the technical producer, announcer, photographer, and personality with WNPR and the Colin McEnroe Show. Her production house is aptly named "Chion Wolf Productions".

She produces and hosts The Mouth-Off - a live storytelling event at the Mark Twain House & Museum in Hartford, a monthly live advice show at Sea Tea Improv's underground comedy theater, "Asking for a Friend", and a weekly Facebook live show, "It's Chopped Salad Time! (with Chion Wolf").

Chion is a an animator, and a stop-motion enthusiast. She is also an actor and on the Board of Directors for Night Fall, Inc., a yearly Hartford-based public performance with Anne Cubberly's giant puppets, dancers, and music, and she is the founder of "Pedal to the Medal", an annual pre-Eversource Hartford Marathon bike ride which benefits Hartford's only educational bicycle store, BiCi Co.

Wolf is a founding member of the Hartford-based marching band, the Hartford Hot Several, where she plays the trash can bass drum. Chion is also a certified judge with the International Chili Society, and is unapologetic about her love for onions.

Click here for a collection of Colin McEnroe Show intros.

Click here for the Chion Wolf YouTube page.

Click here for the WNPR Flickr page.

Illustration by J. Holt / Flickr Creative Commons

WNPR has an experimental radio project and we want you to get involved. The idea is simple - we provide a theme, you call our hotline and tell a story. 

The theme: a work-related haiku!

On July 22, Colin McEnroe is doing a show all about the haiku, and we want you to write one inspired by the work YOU do. Call up our voicemail number and leave us a message with your haiku: 860-580-9677.

Haiku is unrhymed, syllabic poetry - three lines of 5, 7 and 5 syllables.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The ukulele was not always obscure. Two of the biggest stars of the 20th century used them as their principal instruments. One is a name you probably don't know, but George Formby was a enormous sensation in Great Britain on stage and in movies in the 1920s and '30s. He specialized in playing a banjo-shaped ukulele, and he trafficked in comical, mischievous songs full of double entendres. 

Wolfie's Songs!

Mar 5, 2011

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