Charlie Nardozzi | Connecticut Public Radio
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Charlie Nardozzi

Charlie Nardozzi is a nationally-recognized garden writer, speaker, radio, and television personality. He has worked for more than 20 years bringing expert information to home gardeners.

Charlie hosts Connecticut Garden Journal on WNPR and Vermont Garden Journal on Vermont Public Radio.

Charlie delights in making gardening information simple and accessible to everyone. His love of the natural world also makes him an exciting public speaker and presenter. He has spoken at national venues such as the Northwest Flower Show, Philadelphia Flower Show, San Francisco Flower and Garden Show, Master Gardener conferences, and trade shows. Regionally, Charlie has spoken at venues such as the Connecticut Horticultural Society, University of Connecticut Master Gardener Conference and the Connecticut Flower and Garden Show.

Charlie is a native of Waterbury, Connecticut and has been gardening in New England his whole life. Learn more about him at gardeningwithcharlie.com.

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Turns out, birds love to eat persimmons, too.
Rick Derevan (Flickr / Creative Commons)

Usually when I think of fall fruit trees, I think of apples and pears. They're great but there's another fruit tree that I've grown for a while now and it's a beauty.  

Fall webworm
Judy Gallagher (Flickr / Creative Commons)

Most insect populations in our gardens and forests are on the decline with the fall weather. But one insect is in its glory. The fall webworm is creating white webbed nests on branches of a variety of deciduous trees such as crabapples, plums, elm, oak, and ash. They're obvious this time of year from their large webs on the branch ends. Unlike the tent caterpillars that form webs in branch crotches in spring, web worms cover the ends of branches in fall and feed safely from predators inside the web mesh.

Strawflower
Tom Miller (Flickr / Creative Commons)

Each year, I often rotate growing various cut flowers in our garden. This year I went back to growing two old favorites; strawflowers and statice. I hadn't grown these annual cut flowers for years and I'm glad I did this year.

There's still time to plant carrots, beets and radishes in our gardens even though it's late August.
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It's easy with all the tomatoes, peppers, squashes, melons, cucumbers and beans flowing into our kitchens, to forget about the cool season veggies that have been waiting for us. We recently rediscovered our spring planted root crops. We did start eating beets and carrots earlier this year, then got into all the other veggies. Now, it's time to get back to our roots.

Beautifuclcataya (Flickr / creative commons)

You know fall is coming when the wild asters start to bloom. This native perennial flower is hardy, tough, and long blooming. It's also known as the Michaelmas daisy as it blooms into the end of September during the Feast of Saint Michael. But there's more to this wildflower than what we see in meadows. In the garden paired with goldenrods, sedum and rudbeckia, it's an amazingly easy perennial to grow for beautiful fall color.

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It's been a great summer for flowers. But it's a shame the hot temperatures forced many flowers to go by so quickly. To enjoy the flower season longer, cut some of your favorite annual, perennial and bulb flowers and arrange them in vases indoors. Before you run out and snip some blooms for the table, here are some tips.

Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)
Melinda Young Stuart (Flickr / Creative Commons)

We've been busy watching many different butterflies this summer in our garden. It seems they love this heat and humidity. And there's been enough water for them to thrive. Of course, this time of year the Monarch butterflies become more noticeable. Their prized plant is the milkweed. Many insects only feed and lay eggs on a few different types of plants. That's certainly true of monarchs. Anything in the milkweed family is fair game. Monarch caterpillars have the unique ability to eat the milkweed leaves even with the toxic, white, milky sap. It actually makes the Monarchs less appealing to birds, so it's a protection device, too.

Genovese basil is the basil cooks reach for when making pesto.
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Basil is one of those quintessential tastes of summer. Growing up, it reminds me of my mom's eggplant parmesan, Caprese salad and tomato sauce. You can't grow tomatoes without growing some basil.

Raspberries
Pixabay

July is raspberry season. But you might have noticed some damage on your raspberry canes. Two common problems you'll see this time of year are raspberry cane blight and raspberry tip borer. Although neither problem will wipe out your raspberry crop, they both will reduce your yields.

Ground cherries
anneheathen (Flickr / Creative Commons)

Some vegetables are just fun. We've been growing ground cherries for years. This tomato-family vegetable looks like a mini version of a tomatillo. It's a sprawling 2-foot tall plant that produces an abundance of green turning to brown papery husks. Inside the husk is the fun part. Small, cherry-sized fruits mature from green to golden. Unwrap the husk, harvest and snack on the fruits. They taste like a cross between a tomato and pineapple. They are sweet and delicious and something kids really love.

Japanese Stiltgrass
NY State IPM Program at Cornell University (Flickr / Creative Commons)

This time of year it's important to be on the look out for weeds in the lawn and garden. One new Asian weed import that's spreading around the state is Japanese stiltgrass.

Harvesting 'Red Golds'
Chiot's Run (Flickr / Creative Commons)

We grow potatoes in our garden. Even though they're cheap and plentiful, there's more to potatoes than russets and white boiling potato varieties. There are many unusual potato varieties you won't find in most markets. These varities feature red or blue skin and flesh and unusual textures, shapes and sizes.

Geranium 'Ann Folkard'
troistoques (time-out) (Flickr / Creative Commons)

There are geraniums and then there are geraniums. The classic geraniums everyone knows are the annual flowers my mom used to love. She'd pot up some red geraniums every year at her house. While I still grow annual geraniums in honor of my mom, I also like perennial geraniums.

strawberry
PEXELS.COM

It's strawberry fields forever. The delicious red berries are coming in strong and it's time to take care of the berries and plants for next year.

Starting a garden with your kids this summer? Let them take the lead so they'll enjoy the space and want to be there.
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Kids have been home for months now and with summer on our doorstep, many parents are looking for kid activities. Gardening is the perfect solution. Here's some ideas for starting a kids garden with your young children this summer.

Cucamelons grow the size of a cherry tomato and are striped like watermelons.
Page (Flickr / Creative Commons)

Cucumbers are one of those staple vegetable garden crops everyone grows. Most gardeners are familiar with the green slicing cucumbers and pickling cucumbers. But, if you have a little extra room in your veggie garden this spring, try some unusual cukes. You'll be surprised by their color, texture and taste.

Lavender 'Hidcote'
Gwendolyn Stansbury (Flickr) / Creative Commons

There is nothing like the sight and smell of lavender. I was fortunate enough to travel to the South of France and see the lavender fields. But we don't have to travel to Europe to enjoy this prized herb. There are lavender farms in Connecticut and you can grow it in your own backyard. You just need to select the right varieties and grow them properly. It's the National Garden Bureau's Plant of the Year, so let's grow some lavender.

Hosta (Multiple Varieties)
Dianna Ott (Flickr) / Creative Commons

This ancient, common shade perennial flower originates from China and Japan. It grows wild in the forested mountains. It's a favorite wild spring edible, collected when the shoots are young and then roasted or sautéed. It didn't reach Europe and United States until the 1800's but now there are thousands of varieties. This shade perennial is the hosta. Hosta is the go-to shade plant for many gardeners. It grows easily with colorful leaves and pink or white flowers.

Dandelions
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Americans have an obsession with dandelions. This much maligned weed, actually was brought to North American for its culinary and medicinal uses. It's high in vitamins and was considered a delicacy during Victorian times.

Florence Fennel
Quinn Dombrowski (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Growing up in an Italian-American household, one of the treats of spring was eating raw bulbs of Florence fennel. My mother would prepare it with a simple dressing of olive oil, salt, pepper and a dash of balsamic vinegar. I grew up loving this anise flavored vegetable.

Amsonia 'Blue Ice'
mwms1916 (Flickr) / creative commons

I first grew amsonia or bluestar perennial flower years ago in a public garden. I was impressed with the size, stature and beautiful light blue flowers that it produced in early summer and gorgeous golden fall foliage. Bluestar is a native plant that should get more recognition. It was the Perennial Plant of the Year back in 2011, but I rarely see it in gardens.

Nasturtium leaves
Courtesy of Steve Aitken

With spring in full force, many gardeners are planting violas and pansies. It reminds me to plant some edible flowers in our garden this year. Not all flowers are edible and not all flowers are tasty to eat, but there are many that are a delight to the eyes and tongue.

Tomato seedling
Renee (Flickr) / Creative Commons

There's been a big spike in people buying vegetable seeds. Hopefully this means lots of people will be growing a Victory Garden of vegetables to help offset the economic hardships caused by the pandemic, have some healthy food, and get outside and enjoy Nature. But many people don't have room for a garden. The solution is container gardening and the number one vegetable everyone wants to grow is tomatoes.

Snap pea
nanao wagatsuma (Flickr) / creative commons

With the Coronavirus keeping many of us at home, it's time to focus on the vegetable garden. Now is a perfect time to start planting and it all begins with peas. Peas have been eaten for thousands of years but mostly as a dried vegetable. It wasn't until King Louis 14th that royalty started eating fresh garden peas. Commoners have been eating them only for a few hundred years.

Invincibelle Spirit Hydrangea
Courtesy of Steve Aitken

Many gardeners are pruning trees and shrubs this time of year. One shrub that often confounds people is the hydrangea. The reason for the confusion is different species of hydrangeas are pruned at different times. So, let's do a quick hydrangea pruning 101.

Gardening tools
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With lives upended due to the coronavirus, many of us are spending some unexpected time at home. The silver lining is we have more time to work in the garden. Here's a review what to do, and not do, in the garden now.

Mixed flower garden bed
Marilylle Soveran (Flickr) / Creative Commons

There's nothing like the sight and smell of fresh cut flowers in your home from spring to fall. While it's great to support local growers and florists, you can grow your own cut flower garden, too. Here's how.

Witch Hazel
sharin (Flickr) / Creative Commons

This time of year we're all starved for color. Maybe a few snowdrops, crocus and hellebores are blooming, but we need more! One shrub to the rescue is an unusual one because it blooms either now or late fall, depending on the species, with colorful, spider-like blossoms. It's the witch hazel.

Tomato seedlings
JP Goguen (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Tomatoes are the most popular home garden vegetable for good reason. They're easy to grow and there are tons of varieties. Tomato varieties range from tiny plants like 'Micro Tom' to monsters like 'Giant Belgium'. But if you want to experiment with growing novel tomato varieties you're probably going to have to grow them from seed. So here's a refresher on growing tomato seeds indoors.

Celery
John Sheldon (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Celery is an ancient and trendy vegetable. Wild versions from the Mediterranean, were used medicinally in 850 BC. Relatives of celery, though, can be found around the world. The Italians started growing it as a vegetable in the 17th century creating taller stalks that weren't as strongly flavored. Today, celery-based smoothies are popular for detoxing the body.

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