Casey McDermott | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Casey McDermott

Casey McDermott is an online reporter covering politics, policy, and New Hampshire news. She also works on digital reporting projects for NHPR's newsroom.

Prior to joining NHPR, Casey worked at The Concord Monitor, and held internships at Pro Publica and the Student Press Law Association. While attending college at Penn State, Casey was recognized nationally for her writing and editorial work as Editor in Chief of the school's newspaper, The Collegian, during the Jerry Sandusky scandal.   

New Hampshire is home to the largest citizen legislature in the country — 424 members in all. And it's built around the idea that citizens who serve will bring their everyday experiences to their roles as elected officials.

As a result, it's not unusual to see landlords sponsoring bills on evictions, retirees voting on changes to the state retirement system or business owners setting the rates for the very same business taxes they pay.

The New Hampshire primary is tentatively scheduled for Feb. 11, 2020, which is only — or "still," depending on your tolerance for campaign coverage — about a year away.

And for the past half-century, one of the most recognizable symbols of the Granite State's early electoral contest has been Dixville Notch's midnight vote.

For the last four decades, the road to the White House has run through New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner's office.

While they say there’s much more work to do, advocates and law enforcement officials alike say have some reason to be optimistic about the future of police-community relations in New Hampshire.

“The community as a whole is discussing things a lot more,” Portsmouth Police Chief David Mara said on Tuesday’s episode of The Exchange, which focused on the relationship between law enforcement and minorities. “People are talking a lot more.”

To say that Pam Livengood made an impression on Hillary Clinton’s campaign might be an understatement.

The Keene resident first met Clinton last year, on the candidate’s first campaign visit to New Hampshire. At the time, she spoke up about how her family’s been affected by the state’s substance abuse crisis – she took over guardianship of her grandson a few years ago because of issues stemming from her daughter's drug addiction.

These days, the story of New Hampshire’s economy is kind of a “good news, bad news” tale. The good news: Unemployment is low, at least on paper, and wages seem to be rising, if slowly. The bad news: Employers are struggling to fill positions, and lots of prospective employees say they can’t find the kind of stable, full-time work they’d like to have.