Carmen Baskauf | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Carmen Baskauf

Producer, Where We Live

Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Carmen Baskauf is a producer for WNPR news-talk show Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil. She has also contributed to The Colin McEnroe Show.

Carmen produces shows on a wide variety of topics for Where We Live; she especially loves producing shows about science and history. Some highlights include producing a full hour about menstruation (recipient of a national PRNDI award) and meeting a real-live glowing axolotl in studio for a show on bioluminescence and biofluorescence.

Originally from Nashville, Tennessee, Carmen now lives in New Haven, Connecticut. She has a B.A. in History from Yale University, where she studied nationalist movements in 20th-century North Africa and the Middle East, as well as international migration and human trafficking.

In her free time, Carmen likes reading about science, playing bridge, and learning new languages. You can sometimes find her riding to work on an electric scooter.

Ways to Connect

Debby Shapiro

Middletown today is known for its vibrant main street and the scenic grounds of Wesleyan University.

But the city began as a trading port on the Connecticut River, and from its founding, much of the wealth that came into that port was tied to the transatlantic slave trade. This hour, we hear about a new UNESCO memorial that has brought recognition to that city’s role in slavery.

We also learn about members of a historic African American family in that city who were at the forefront of fighting slavery. The Bemans were prominent abolitionists and leaders in the Middletown’s free black community in the 19th century. 

Some residents today are hoping to see a new public school bear the name of that family. Are you a Middletown resident? How do you think your city should approach its history?

Wokandapix / Pixabay

As college students wrap up their fall semester, there is an expectation their professors are tenured. But three out of four faculty today aren’t eligible for tenure. And many are adjuncts, part-time faculty without strong benefits or job security.

What’s the human cost to this model of education? We find out and we want to hear from you.

Studio Incendo - P1111040 / Wikimedia Commons

For nearly six months, pro-democracy protesters have taken to the streets of Hong Kong. Some demonstrations have turned violent, as protesters clash with the police. 

This hour, we talk about the roots of this protest movement and learn more about the history of the territory's relationship with mainland China. We also hear from a reporter who sat down with a Hong Kong father and son, two men on opposite sides of the police-community divide.

image of fiber optics
Groman123 / Flickr

Most of us enjoy high-speed internet access. But in some areas in Connecticut, residents still don’t have broadband access. We hear about a recent court ruling that could change this.

Pixabay

If your smartphone screen cracks, do you get it fixed or trade it in for the latest model? Repairing items can be less wasteful, but there are also growing legal challenges for people whose business is to repair technology from smartphones to tractors.

This hour, we talk about the “Right to Repair” movement. It's a debate that pits concerns about users’ ability to modify their own items against big companies’ concerns about intellectual property rights.

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

When you head to New York, do you ever take a break from the city and get lost on a trail in Central Park? This hour, we take a look at the life of the man behind that beloved and iconic city park: Connecticut native Frederick Law Olmsted.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

While the U.S. is withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accord, states like Connecticut are still committed to reducing their carbon emissions. Offshore wind power is one way.

This hour, we take a look at proposals to bring wind energy to Connecticut. How will the Trump administration’s inaction on renewables impact this emerging industry in our region?

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

At sixteen years of age, Reginald Dwayne Betts went to prison for carjacking. Decades later, Betts is a celebrated poet and graduate of Yale Law School. But, like many ex-offenders, the consequences of those teenage mistakes have followed him for years.

Kishi Bashi playing violin outdoors
Max Ritter

Violinist and singer Kishi Bashi is Japanese American. His most recent musical project, Omoiyari, takes a look at the history of Japanese internment, when 120,000 Japanese Americans were incarcerated, fueled by xenophobia during World War II.

This hour, we sit down with Kishi Bashi to talk about why he’s turning to history to better understand our present, and we ask him about his unique musical style.

Max Pixel

High-profile cases of sexual harassment in the workplace have made headlines in recent years, from Hollywood to Capitol Hill.

A new series from Hearst Connecticut Media finds workplace sexual harassment and abuse is pervasive across Connecticut. This hour, we talk with one of the reporters behind the series.

Debby Shapiro

Middletown today is known for its vibrant main street and the scenic grounds of Wesleyan University.

But the city began as a trading port on the Connecticut River, and from its founding, much of the wealth that came into that port was tied to the transatlantic slave trade. This hour, we hear about a new UNESCO memorial that has brought recognition to that city’s role in slavery.

We also learn about members of a historic African American family in that city who were at the forefront of fighting slavery. The Bemans were prominent abolitionists and leaders in the Middletown’s free black community in the 19th century. 

Some residents today are hoping to see a new public school bear the name of that family. Are you a Middletown resident? How do you think your city should approach its history?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

In April, 18-year-old Anthony Jose Vega Cruz was driving in Wethersfield, Connecticut, on the way to dinner with his girlfriend. But he was stopped by police. He fled. The pursuit ended when an officer fatally shot Vega Cruz, known as "Chulo" to family and friends. 

This hour, we sit down with reporter, Vanessa de la Torre. She is the supervising producer of Collision Course, a new Connecticut Public documentary.

Mary Anne Williams

Dozens of Connecticut homes have been hoisted off the ground as the state helps pay homeowners to repair ruined concrete foundations. 

This hour, we check in on the crumbling foundations crisis that is impacting homes and homeowners. We talk with the Hartford Courant journalist behind a yearlong series on Connecticut’s ruined concrete foundations

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

Do you worry about how you’re everyday actions contribute to climate change? You may think about the carbon gas-burning cars are putting into the atmosphere, or coal-powered electricity in your houses.

But what about the food you eat?

Tracking Connecticut's Bobcats

Oct 11, 2019
Lydia Brown / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s a lethal hunter, marked by its tufted ears and focused gaze. It's a breathtaking sight, if you’re lucky enough to see one.

This hour: the bobcat.

This stealthy species has made a comeback in recent years. We talk to researchers who are working to better understand Connecticut’s only wild feline. 

nathanmac87 / Flickr Creative Commons

Cities and towns have laws to keep people from engaging in behavior that may disturb others, like sleeping on park benches, drinking in public, or just plain “loitering”.

What does it mean when just hanging out in a public space puts you in violation of these laws?

Connecticut Historical Society

Bicycles helped inspire modern cars, paved roads...even airplanes! But did you know they were also an inspiration for the women's movement?

This hour we take a look back in time at the origins of the bicycle, including innovation that happened right here in Connecticut. We find out the history of how this vehicle spurred social change and helped empower women to break through gender barriers a little more than a century ago.

images of Giant ground sloth (Megatherium americanum), Moa (Megalapteryx didinus), Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)
Ballista, George Edward Lodge, Michael L. Baird / Wikimedia Commons

What would it have been like to see a huge, elephant-like mastodon roaming our state? 

The earth has been home to some spectacularly large animals. A few of them still roam or swim our world today. This hour, we take a look at the biology of these giants. 

From chunky island-dwelling birds to the enormous blue whale, what do we know about why these creatures evolved to be so big? And why don’t we see more of them today? 

Plus, with a UN report warning that a million species are at risk of extinction in coming years, are we at risk of losing those big creatures we still have?

TBEC Review / Wikimedia Commons

Doctors and public health officials are still trying to figure out the cause behind more than 800 lung injuries related to vaping that have been reported in the U.S. in recent months.

At the same time, there is a longer-term public health crisis as more and more young people have become addicted to nicotine through e-cigarette use -- despite decades of declining traditional cigarette use among teens. 

This hour, we talk about these two public health crises. Do you vape nicotine products like Juul, or maybe use THC cartridges or vape pens from a dispensary? Has the current outbreak in lung injuries changed your vaping habits?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The University of Connecticut has a new leader. This hour, we sit down with UConn’s new president, Thomas Katsouleas, who stepped into the role this August.

Katsouleas is trained as a physicist and electrical engineer whose career has focused on plasma science. We hear about his path to Connecticut and ask him about his vision for Connecticut's flagship state university.

Wokandapix / Pixabay

As college students settle into the fall semester, there is an expectation their professors are tenured. But three out of four faculty today aren’t eligible for tenure. And many are adjuncts, part-time faculty without strong benefits or job security.

What’s the human cost to this model of education? We find out and we want to hear from you.

John9474 / Wikimedia Commons

In 2018, around one thousand Connecticut residents died from opioid overdoses, according to the state’s Chief Medical Examiner.  Connecticut has joined nearly every state including thousands of municipalities in suing Stamford-based opioid manufacturer Purdue Pharma.

This hour, we get the latest after Purdue filed for bankruptcy Sunday. Twenty states tentatively reached a multi-billion dollar settlement with Purdue Pharma. But we find out why Connecticut Attorney General William Tong says this settlement doesn’t go far enough.

Later, we hear from a Connecticut teen who’s helping organize a “Connecticut Climate Strike” this Friday in Hartford.

And we get the latest on the Bridgeport mayoral race.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / Connecticut Public Radio

Rosa DeLauro has served Connecticut’s third congressional district for 28 years, and is an influential Democratic leader who is close with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

This hour Representative DeLauro joins us. We talk about trade negotiations, immigration, safety net programs, and more.

What questions do you have for the Congresswoman?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

For more than 30 years, Quinnipiac University was led by John Lahey. Now, the private university in Hamden, Connecticut has a new leader and its first female president. This hour, we sit down with President Judy Olian.

Olian comes to the university from UCLA, where she was Dean of the business school.

We find out what is her vision for Quinnipiac University, and ask: In an age of ever-changing technology, how is the school preparing its students successfully for the workforce of the future?

Stairway on path in Walnut Hill Park in New Britain, Connecticut
John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

When you head to New York, do you ever take a break from the city and get lost on a trail in Central Park? This hour, we take a look at the life of the man behind that beloved and iconic city park: Connecticut native Frederick Law Olmsted.

Christiaan Colen / Wikimedia Commons

As students head back to school, teachers and administrators in Wolcott, Connecticut will start the school year without access to important files.

The Wolcott Public School system computers were attacked by ransomware, a type of computer virus that holds essential data hostage unless the school agrees to pay attackers a ransom.

This hour, we take a look at why hackers have increased attacks on local governments and schools for ransomware. What does this mean for Connecticut, a state with hundreds of separate municipal governments and school systems?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Luke Bronin has been mayor of Hartford since 2016. Now, with the mayoral primary race just around the corner, Bronin is hoping that Democratic voters in the city will choose him as their party’s nominee. 

This hour, we sit down with Mayor Bronin.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Joe Ganim’s election as Bridgeport’s mayor in 2015 was an unlikely comeback story. 

Reelected after seven years in federal prison for felony corruption, Ganim got a second chance. And now, he is asking for their vote to put him back in the mayor’s office once more.

This hour, we sit down with Joe Ganim ahead of the September 10th Democratic primary. 

If you’re a Bridgeport resident, we want to hear from you. What questions do you have for Mayor Ganim? We take your calls, tweets, and Facebook comments.

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

images of Giant ground sloth (Megatherium americanum), Moa (Megalapteryx didinus), Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)
Ballista, George Edward Lodge, Michael L. Baird / Wikimedia Commons

What would it have been like to see a huge, elephant-like mastodon roaming our state? 

The earth has been home to some spectacularly large animals. A few of them still roam or swim our world today.

This hour, we take a look at the biology of these giants. 

Pexels / Creative Commons

From surprise bills to sky-high deductibles, the American health care system is not working perfectly for many. But what’s the fix?

This hour: Democratic presidential candidates have a wide variety of ideas to reform how Americans are insured, from a “public option” to “Medicare for All”. But what do these terms mean? We break it down.

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