Carmen Baskauf | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Carmen Baskauf

Producer, Where We Live

Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Carmen Baskauf is a producer for WNPR news-talk show Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil. She has also contributed to The Colin McEnroe Show.

Carmen produces shows on a wide variety of topics for Where We Live; she especially loves producing shows about science and history. Some highlights include producing a full hour about menstruation (recipient of a national PRNDI award) and meeting a real-live glowing axolotl in studio for a show on bioluminescence and biofluorescence.

Originally from Nashville, Tennessee, Carmen now lives in New Haven, Connecticut. She has a B.A. in History from Yale University, where she studied nationalist movements in 20th-century North Africa and the Middle East, as well as international migration and human trafficking.

In her free time, Carmen likes reading about science, playing bridge, and learning new languages. You can sometimes find her riding to work on an electric scooter.

Ways to Connect

Mike Mozart / Flickr

How often do you buy new clothing?

Stores like H&M and Forever 21 sell new styles at low prices, making it easy to constantly update your wardrobe. But, this hour, we listen back to a conversation about the environmental and social costs of "fast fashion". 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Refugees Ibrahim Aldabaan and Adeebah Alnemar and their five children escaped Syria’s bloody civil war to restart their life in Connecticut in 2016. The family moved to West Hartford, where Alnemar got a job working as a cook for a Catholic church, and Aldabaan found work delivering packages for Amazon. But now, the refugee family is facing a new hardship: both parents have contracted COVID-19.

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Many elderly residents depend on skilled nursing care. But as the number of cases of COVID-19 grow across the state, families are increasingly worried about their loved ones in facilities. Older adults are most vulnerable to the coronavirus, and in Connecticut, nearly 4 in 10 deaths from COVID-19 are people in nursing homes.

This hour, we take a look at the COVID-19 pandemic in Connecticut’s nursing homes. We talk about the state’s latest plans to try to mitigate the spread of the disease, and hear about the impact of the pandemic on residents and staff.

CDC/ Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAM / Wikimedia Commons

COVID-19 has dominated our lives, but how much do you actually know about the virus that causes this disease?

This hour, we talk with NY Times columnist and writer, Carl Zimmer about the science behind the coronavirus. We learn about how viruses work and how they’re different from other disease-causing germs like bacteria.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The latest models from national public health experts say hundreds of thousands of Americans may die from the COVID-19 pandemic. As Connecticut and other states begin to reach the peak of infections and hospitalizations, will hospitals be able to keep up?

This hour, we talk with US Senator Chris Murphy about what lawmakers should be doing to bolster the country’s healthcare capacity. The senator has called for federalizing the medical supply chain.

Jeff Belmonte / Wikimedia

Love is what most people are looking for in a spouse or life partner. But this hour, we take a look at marriage, an institution that for much of history had very little to do with love at all.

We also talk about the right to end a marriage by divorce. And we want to hear from you, too.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Cases of COVID-19 have grown in New Haven, and the mayor says “the spike” is beginning in the Elm City. This hour, we talk with New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker.

As the number of COVID-19 cases rises across Connecticut, how can local leaders protect their residents? From hospitals to homelessness to jobs, what does the pandemic means for Connecticut’s second largest city?

If you are a New Haven resident, we want to hear from you. What questions do you have for Mayor Elicker?

Pxhere

What’s it like being a dad in 2020? On the next Where We Live, we’ll talk about social expectations for fathers as caregivers, and the impact an involved father has on the entire family, emotionally and financially. Are you a father? We want to hear from you.

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As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise in Connecticut and across the US, many Americans are staying home to prevent the spread of this deadly disease. But not everyone can work remotely and many people have lost their jobs. This hour, we take a look at the pandemic’s economic impact .

We hear from Connecticut workers in the gig economy—people who drive for Lyft or deliver for Uber Eats. And we talk with an economist about what policies can ease the economic burden on Americans.

We want to hear from you. How is the coronavirus affecting your family—and your pocketbook?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

As Americans respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, what should elected officials be doing to protect public health? Today, we talk with Connecticut 1st District congressman John Larson. As coronavirus spreads, how will lawmakers do their jobs? Do you have a questions for Rep Larson?

Fossil conservator Amber Favreau works on disassembling the  museum’s Brontosaurus skeleton.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This hour, we take a trip to the Yale Peabody Museum, where a renovation is giving the museum a chance to update its famous dinosaur skeletons to reflect 21st century scientific knowledge.

The museum has disassembled all of its large fossil skeletons, which have been shipped to a facility in Canada to be remounted. When they return to the Peabody in 2023, dinosaurs like the museum's Brontosaurus will be standing in jauntier--and more scientifically accurate--poses.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

She started as a social worker in Connecticut more than two decades ago. Now, Vannessa Dorantes is the Commissioner of the state’s Department of Children and Families (DCF). This hour, we sit down with Commissioner Dorantes. What questions do you have for the leader of DCF?

Tucker Ives / Connecticut Public Radio

Aired live February 5, 2019

Cities and towns have laws to keep people from engaging in behavior that may disturb others, like sleeping on park benches, drinking in public, or just plain “loitering”.

What does it mean when just hanging out in a public space puts you in violation of these laws?

Debby Shapiro

Aired live October 24, 2019

Middletown today is known for its vibrant main street and the scenic grounds of Wesleyan University.

But the city began as a trading port on the Connecticut River, and from its founding, much of the wealth that came into that port was tied to the transatlantic slave trade. This hour, we hear about a new UNESCO memorial that has brought recognition to that city’s role in slavery.

We also learn about members of a historic African American family in that cit

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Aired live May 21, 2019

Donald Collins first told his mom he was transgender when he was a senior in high school. His mother wasn’t totally sure what the word transgender even meant. From there, they began a difficult emotional journey as Donald began his transition.

This hour, we sit down with Donald and his mother, Mary Collins. They have written about their experience in the book At the Broken Places: A Mother and Trans Son Pick Up the Pieces. We ask them how they rebuilt their relationship and what lessons they hope to share with other families.

Have you or a loved one come out as transgender? We want to hear from you.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Aired live January 3, 2019

When Rabbi Philip Lazowski was just eleven years old, Nazis invaded his hometown and began the mass slaughter of Jewish residents.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

March Madness begins in a couple of weeks, a favorite time of year for people who love watching college basketball. But if you want to legally place bets on your favorite team, inside Connecticut you’re out of luck.

This hour: will the General Assembly legalize sports betting this legislative session?

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s tax season. Filing taxes can be a complicated and intimidating process. And ProPublica has found that big names in e-filing, like TurboTax, are actually making it more difficult for Americans to file easily and free of charge. This hour, we talk with a reporter behind the investigation, and find out whether you can file your taxes for free.

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Listen Monday at 9:00 am.

Deaths related to alcohol have been rising over the past two decades, especially among women.  Today, we look at the impact of alcohol on public health.

And in January 1920, Prohibition went into effect around the country, making it illegal to sell alcohol. One century after the beginning of this national experiment, we ask: what is a productive policy approach today to dealing with addiction?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Lori Jackson feared for her life, so she got a temporary restraining order against her husband. But he was still able to legally buy a handgun, which he used to kill Jackson.

This hour, we talk about the legal gaps that allow some domestic abusers to purchase firearms.

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

Listen Monday at 9:00 am.

They grew up during a digital revolution, two foreign wars, and a devastating financial crisis.  Now, millennials are beginning to come into political power, and those formative experiences shaping them into a different kind of politician than found in past generations.

This hour, we talk with TIME national political correspondent Charlotte Alter. Her new book is called “The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America.” We learn--about the forces that have shaped millennials’ unique political experience and what this  means for the future of the country.

Trinity College

Ugandan-American musician Samite Mulondo combines music and storytelling in his performances. This hour, Samite returns to our studios to talk about his newest piece, The Story Of Mutoto, which he performs at the University of Saint Joseph this weekend.

And  Hartford’s art house theater Cinestudio celebrates fifty years of showing films this week. We talk with Cinestudio’s founders, James Hanley and Peter McMorris.

Staff Sgt. James L. Harper Jr. / U.S. Air Force

From veterans returning from Iraq, to survivors of mass shootings, to those putting together the pieces after a hurricane--we know that the emotional and psychological scars of violence and tragedies sometimes last even longer than physical wounds.

But what is the psychological toll on those who help victims of traumatic experiences?

Chion Wolf/Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This summer marks 100 years since women achieved the right to vote. Yet women still are underrepresented in political office, both nationally and in the Connecticut General Assembly. This hour, a conversation with a panel of experts and women lawmakers. We ask: what barriers remain for women who are considering seeking office?

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Rgaudin / Wikimedia Commons

Love is in the air around Valentine’s Day, and for some it may be the time for a romantic proposal. Today, love is something most people are looking for in a partnership with a spouse, but that hasn’t always been the case: In fact, for much of history, marriage was an institution that had very little to do with love.

Jeff Belmonte / Wikimedia

Valentine's Day is around the corner, which means it’s the season for chocolates and cheesy Hallmark cards.

Love is what most people are looking for in a spouse or life partner. But this hour, we take a look at marriage, an institution that for much of history had very little to do with love at all.

Publicdomainpictures.net

The death of a pet can be devastating --yet when you lose an animal companion--you’re sometimes expected to “just get over it.”  This hour, we talk about human attachment to pets. Have you experienced the death of a beloved animal? How comfortable were you talking about your grief with others?

Pxhere

What’s it like being a dad in 2020? On the next Where We Live, we’ll talk about social expectations for fathers as caregivers, and the impact an involved father has on the entire family, emotionally and financially. Are you a father? We want to hear from you.

Mike Mozart / Flickr

How often do you buy new clothing?

Stores like H&M and Forever 21 sell new styles at low prices, making it easy to constantly update your wardrobe. But, this hour: the environmental and social costs of "fast fashion". 

From unsafe garment factories to pollution in rivers, we hear about impacts of the fashion industry from journalist Jasmin Malik Chua.

BoyuZhang1998 / Wikimedia Commons

It’s a busy week in politics. The presidential primary season kicked off in Iowa, and tonight is the President’s State of the Union Address. Meanwhile, the impeachment trial nears its end. This hour, Southern Connecticut State University political scientist Jennifer Hopper joins us.  

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