Bill Chappell | Connecticut Public Radio
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

Amazon.com plans to hire more than 5,000 full-time workers for its warehouse and order-fulfillment centers, the retailing giant said Monday. Many of the jobs will be at Amazon outposts that are spread across more than 10 states.

"Median pay inside Amazon fulfillment centers is 30 percent higher than that of people who work in traditional retail stores," the company said in a news release announcing its plans.

Gay people should be integrated into society instead of ostracized, Pope Francis told journalists after his weeklong trip to Brazil. Answering a question about reports of homosexuals in the clergy, the pope answered, "If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?"

In what's being called an unusually broad and candid news conference, Francis took questions from reporters for more than an hour as he flew from Brazil to the Vatican; his plane landed Monday.

As it unveils its all-electric i3 compact sedan Monday, BMW also plans to offer buyers the option of booking a gas-powered SUV for a few weeks every year, according to reports. The move is part of BMW's efforts to ease customers' concerns about relying on an electric vehicle year-round, particularly for long family trips.

Investigators in southern Italy are examining the scene a day after a bus carrying nearly 50 people plummeted off a highway and into a ravine east of Naples. Italian news agencies say at least 38 people died Sunday night after the bus crashed through a guardrail and fell nearly 100 feet to the rough terrain below.

The crash injured at least 10 people, including people who were in cars the bus hit before it left the roadway. Several children are believed to be among the wounded.

More than a dozen car bombs exploded in Iraq early Monday, killing more than 50 people in Baghdad and other areas. At least 10 explosions were reported in the Iraqi capital during the morning rush hour.

Monday's bombings wounded more than 100 people, the BBC reports.

"Police and medical sources said the attacks, which appeared to be coordinated, were concentrated on towns and cities in Iraq's predominantly Shi'ite south," Reuters reports, "and districts of the capital where Shi'ites reside."

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