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Assistant City Clerk May Reed, center, hands off the absentee ballots from Tuesday to Head Moderator Kevin Arnold, left.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

The last absentee ballot dropped off on Tuesday arrived at the New Haven City Hall of Records by bike. With a minute to 8 p.m., the voter threw down her bike and practically dived at the ballot box as City Clerk Michael Smart came by to lock up.

A box of absentee ballots waits to be counted at the New Haven Hall of Records Tuesday night. Ballots postmarked by Tuesday and received by Thursday will be counted. But ballots put in the mail Tuesday may or may not arrive in time.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

Absentee ballots in the mail for this week’s primary elections have to be postmarked by Tuesday and delivered by Thursday to be counted. But some ballots postmarked on Tuesday may not have made it through the U.S. mail in time to reach municipal clerks’ offices by Thursday. The responsibility for timely ballots lies somewhere between the voter and the postal service.

Mark Ojakian Is Retiring As CSCU President

Aug 12, 2020
Mark Ojakian
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Mark E. Ojakian, the influential behind-the-scenes operative at the State Capitol who became the high-profile president of the troubled Connecticut State Colleges & Universities system in 2015, persisting in a job that defeated two academics, is retiring at year’s end.

Dave Wurtzel / Connecticut Public

Once a week outside a Newington nursing home, Peggy Johnson stands masked, 6 feet apart from her 94-year-old mom, imagining what it would be like to hug again. 

Henry Boulton, capacity monitor at a poll at Conard High School in West Hartford, gives an instruction to Elizabeth Davis who voted for the first time on Tuesday,
YEHYUN KIM / CTMirror.org

The top-line races were easy. Soon after the polls closed Tuesday night, the Associated Press declared Republican Donald J. Trump and Democrat Joe Biden winners of the year’s final presidential nomination contest, the twice-delayed Connecticut primary.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

A young man with his girlfriend stood in the shade under an awning at the side of an RV truck parked near Barnard Park in Hartford on a recent Tuesday morning. Holding a bag in one hand and reaching through an opening in a screened door with the other, he dropped empty, used syringes into a medical waste bucket.

“Eighty-eight, eighty-nine, ninety,” he counted, each needle making a thunk as it disappeared into bright red plastic. 

Courtesy: Norwich Public Utilities Facebook

With some in Connecticut just getting their power back one week after Tropical Storm Isaias, a lot of families have wondered aloud whether some other company could do a better job than Eversource and United Illuminating. One man who emphatically answers yes is Joe Courtney, the U.S. representative for Connecticut’s 2nd District. 

Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

Voters go to the polls today in an unusual election year. With over 300,000 absentee ballots requested for the primary elections, much of the voting has -- or should have -- already happened. But between delayed ballot mailing and postal service disruptions from Tropical Storm Isaias, many voters received their ballots late.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

The former commissioner of the state Department of Public Health is firing back over her May termination ahead of an impending report this month on Connecticut’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Two months after Gov. Ned Lamont announced her dismissal, Renée Coleman-Mitchell said in a written statement released late Monday night by the law office of Eric R. Brown that she was going to “set the record straight in my own words.” 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

The effort to clean up in Connecticut towns and cities continues, a week after Tropical Storm Isaias tore through the state -- leaving many to stew in the dark over the response from utility companies.

Connecticut Issues First Fines For Violating COVID Travel Advisory

Aug 10, 2020
Governor Ned Lamont
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Connecticut issued its first fines Monday for violations of the state’s requirements for travelers from COVID-19 hot spot states, making an example of two residents returning from Florida and Louisiana.

“We wanted to send a message loud and clear,” Gov. Ned Lamont said. “I hate to do it, but we’re going to be serious and show people we are serious about this, and to date it’s made a difference.”

Power Outages Stoke Concern Over Possible Uptick In COVID Cases

Aug 9, 2020
Visitors gather to charge their electronic devices at the Westfarms shopping mall in West Hartford. Power outages after Tropical Storm Isaias have caused residents to visit public places where they can charge their devices, despite concern about COVID-19.
Yehyun Kim / CTMirror.org

As hundreds of thousands of Connecticut residents adjusted to life without power last week, Gov. Ned Lamont praised the state’s COVID-19 statistics, pointing to days without recorded deaths and a low positivity rate among test results.

Official Ballot Boxes outside West Hartford Town Hall have sped up the town clerk’s process of accepting absentee ballots, according to Essie Labrot, West Hartford Town Clerk. Voters can drop ballots in the boxes up until 8 p.m. on Election Day. Putting a
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

As of Friday, the town of West Hartford had received about 2,000 of 10,500 absentee ballots requested for Tuesday’s primary elections.


Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s now been three days since many Connecticut residents and businesses lost power in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Isaias. And leaders of local municipalities are increasingly frustrated with power companies keeping them in the dark – in more ways than one.

Courtesy: Stamford Town Center

In the middle of Stamford sits Stamford Town Center, once a massive mall that drew in shoppers regionally. Now it’s a mall with a lot of empty storefronts. As of January, 86% of the mall storefronts were occupied. The portion of the mall owned by Taubman is up for sale. Macy’s, which is the flagship store, has a lease ending soon. 

Eversource Was On A Victory Lap. Then Came Isaias

Aug 7, 2020
Yehyun Kim / CT Mirror

Eversource Energy’s chairman and chief executive, Jim Judge, was jubilant in a message to shareholders in March. Based on returns to investors and a seeming newfound immunity to protracted blackouts, Judge assured them the company was coming off its “most successful year ever.” 

A ballot drop box outside of Woodbridge Town Hall.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

There’s a primary next week. And though absentee balloting has been the talk, the question now is whether the power outages caused by Tropical Storm Isaias will affect in-person voting.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont Thursday continued his tour of towns throughout the state recovering from Tropical Storm Isaias, as residents tried their best to make do without power.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

While Hurricane Isaias was still in the Caribbean, officials from Eversource sent a letter to state regulators predicting the storm’s impact. It was the only such letter they sent before the storm. 

But that letter came one day before the utility got a prediction from UConn about the storm’s impact on the power grid. And now, Eversource is facing scrutiny, and hundreds of thousands of customers are still without power. 

Courtesy Huma Farid

Since the killing of George Floyd, some Americans have been examining their role in perpetuating racism and are committing to no longer being silent and inactive.

Paul Russ picks up sticks on his property in Woodbridge a day after tropical storm Isaias hit the state. He says he's seen worse storms. His property was without power since midday Tuesday.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

Tropical storm Isaias sent strong winds through most of the state yesterday, knocking down trees and cutting power to more than 700,000 electric customers. Connecticut residents spent the day cleaning up and waiting for their power to return.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Utility regulators say they will consider whether civil penalties should be applied if Connecticut’s electric companies are found to have botched the response to Tropical Storm Isaias. The Public Utilities Regulatory Authority Thursday outlined the scope of its investigation into the response that was requested by Gov. Ned Lamont. 

Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)
Melinda Young Stuart (Flickr / Creative Commons)

We've been busy watching many different butterflies this summer in our garden. It seems they love this heat and humidity. And there's been enough water for them to thrive. Of course, this time of year the Monarch butterflies become more noticeable. Their prized plant is the milkweed. Many insects only feed and lay eggs on a few different types of plants. That's certainly true of monarchs. Anything in the milkweed family is fair game. Monarch caterpillars have the unique ability to eat the milkweed leaves even with the toxic, white, milky sap. It actually makes the Monarchs less appealing to birds, so it's a protection device, too.

This Candidate Is ON The Ballot. Now, She Just Needs One To Vote

Aug 5, 2020
Kelan Lyons / CT Mirror

Sen. Marilyn Moore, D-Bridgeport, won her first Democratic primary by 82 votes in 2014 and her second two years later by 1,143. On Tuesday, she was fretting over the fact that at least 1,100 Democrats who applied for an absentee ballot in her district have yet to receive one.

Moore is one of them.

James Yu (Flickr Creative Commons)

As next week’s primary elections approach, officials are warning voters with absentee ballots to get them in the mail on Thursday.

Under Connecticut law, ballots received by mail after 8 p.m. on Aug. 11 cannot be counted.


Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

The University of Connecticut has canceled its football team’s 2020 season because of the risk of COVID-19.

Tropical Storm Isaias snapped this pole and damaged a transformer on Arlington Road in West Hartford.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

As Connecticut’s utilities struggle to address a million power outages across the state, there’s no official assessment yet as to when they might be able to restore electricity to most homes. And now state regulators have announced an investigation into whether the state’s largest power company, Eversource, underestimated the threat posed by Tropical Storm Isaias.

Isaias ripped through the state Tuesday with wind speeds gusting to 70 mph, felling trees and bringing down power lines in almost every town. 

How Connecticut's Cautious First Step On Shared Solar Turned Into A False Start

Aug 4, 2020
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

More than three years after the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) selected three shared solar projects for a small pilot program, only one of those projects is operational.

The other two haven’t even started construction. 

DavidsonScott15 / Creative Commons

Hartford Police have identified a man who was killed in a shooting as city resident Kennedy Burgess, 28. He was shot during the second of two incidents in the city Monday night. Mayor Luke Bronin said Tuesday that he thinks the coronavirus crisis is playing a role in the uptick in violence in Hartford.

Riche Be looking for his next cut as Mike Hayes of New Hartford comes to help after a team of motorist clear a large fallen tree that was blocking RT 44 in New Hartford.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Power outages were reported across Connecticut after Tropical Storm Isaias ravaged the state with high winds Tuesday. Downed trees blocked roads and brought down power lines in many towns with winds as high as 70 mph. Utilities say it may take several days for full restoration of power. 

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