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For nearly 200 years, the term “female husband” was used to describe an individual assigned female at birth who chose to live fully as a man.

Historian Jen Manion, a professor at Amherst College in Massachusetts, said from the 1700s to early 1900s, the British and American press wrote about "female husbands" in a mostly salacious and sensationalized way. And when their assigned gender was revealed, they were usually detained by police and run out of town.

After the death of George Floyd, demonstrators rallied outside police departments, on highways and through downtowns across New England calling for police reforms and racial justice.

Amid these protests, Alicia Thomas, a special education teacher in Springfield, Mass., posted on Facebook about the role of teachers in dismantling racism — and how school administrators could do more to support teachers of color.

Starting a garden with your kids this summer? Let them take the lead so they'll enjoy the space and want to be there.
Pixabay.com

Kids have been home for months now and with summer on our doorstep, many parents are looking for kid activities. Gardening is the perfect solution. Here's some ideas for starting a kids garden with your young children this summer.

time magazine titus kaphar
Time

Audio Pending...

This week’s Time Magazine cover is a painting by New Haven artist Titus Kaphar created in response to the killing of George Floyd. 

The painting, Analogous Colors, is powerful -- a black mother, eyes closed, holds her child close to her body. But Kaphar cuts the image of the child out of the canvas, revealing a mother holding the empty silhouette of her baby.

UConn To Resume Classes In August, But Only With Major Pandemic Protections

Jun 10, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

University of Connecticut students will be able to return to classes Aug. 31, but President Thomas Katsouleas warned Wednesday it will be an “academic semester and campus experience that will be unlike anything we have seen previously.”

COVID-19 testing
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Every Thursday, a researcher from Yale University picks up a cooler from the East Shore Water Pollution Abatement Facility in New Haven.

In that cooler is a week’s worth of samples from the sewer system that experts call “sludge,” or the solid waste that is left over after treating wastewater. It can contain a mixture of chemicals, metals and remnants of human waste that is flushed down the toilet. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

On March 8, 2020 Gov. Ned Lamont announced the first declared case of coronavirus in a Connecticut resident. 

Just 12 weeks later, the death toll in the state surpassed 4,000. In between, life had radically changed for everyone in many different ways. 

Federal Decisions Unravel Parts Of Two COVID-19 Executive Branch Orders

Jun 9, 2020
Governor Ned Lamont
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Separate federal rulings this week have rolled back portions of two COVID-related executive branch orders: one suspending fingerprinting for gun permits and another restricting hospital visitation rights for families and friends of people with disabilities.

NTSB via AP

Survivors and family members of deceased passengers are suing the owner and operator of a vintage World War II airplane that crashed at Bradley International Airport last year, killing seven people.

Tameeka Coleman, a single mother who was previously homeless and living on the streets, was able to find a condo through the nonprofit Alpha Community Services, YMCA, in Bridgeport.
Contributed photo

Tameeka Coleman and six of her children lived on the streets before moving into a shelter in Fairfield.

“We were together, so it was bearable,” Coleman, 38, said. The hardest part was when her children cried for their home. “They wanted to know how we had lost our apartment,” said Coleman, who was evicted after she couldn’t pay the rent.   

ACLU And Connecticut Settle COVID-19 Prison Lawsuit

Jun 8, 2020
Kelan Lyons / CT Mirror

The ACLU of Connecticut has reached an agreement with the state over its COVID-19 lawsuit filed to protect incarcerated people from the virus.

Connecticut Businesses Ready To Reopen But Worry Whether Customers Will Return

Jun 8, 2020
connecticut businesses reopen
Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

For some Connecticut businesses scheduled to reopen on June 17, the worry is finding enough disinfectant. For others, the biggest question isn’t about opening their doors but whether anyone will be coming through them any time soon.

Most business operators contacted Monday said the new guidelines issued by Gov. Ned Lamont’s administration for the next phase of Connecticut’s economic re-start in the COVID-19 era were about what they’ve been expecting for weeks.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Glastonbury High School seniors are receiving their diplomas now, even though the governor has paved the way for group graduation ceremonies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public Radio

With the announcement that gyms can reopen next week in Connecticut, some owners are preparing their spaces to allow more distance between members. Meanwhile, others say they don’t have the space to accommodate enough customers to make money.

Ebony Barnes 44, (center) of Bridgeport during the Caravan 4 Justice gather at the Connecticut State Capitol to peacefully demonstrate against the systematic abuse of police power perpetrated against the black community on June 7, 2020 in Hartford.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

A caravan of cars that began in Stamford and stopped in four other towns before making its way to the state Capitol in Hartford on Sunday was among dozens of rallies, demonstrations and protests over the weekend after the recent death of George Floyd. 

The U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London failed to thoroughly investigate racial harassment allegations — including the use of racial slurs — and failed to discipline cadets who were found guilty of that behavior, says a Department of Homeland Security inspector general.

Hundreds of doctors and other medical personnel Friday took a knee in front of the Yale School of Medicine to demonstrate their solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement.
Emily Hays / New Haven Independent

Thousands of demonstrators across Connecticut joined protest marches and rallies Saturday in the growing movement for racial justice triggered by the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd and other incidents of police violence against people of color.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

New Haveners of all ages showed up to march against police brutality on Friday afternoon, but the protest, which drew thousands, was organized by and about the city’s young people. 

With chants of “money for schools, not the police,” young Black and Latinx organizers from the Citywide Youth Coalition made clear that they see reinvesting money from the city’s police budget into education, housing, and job opportunities for young people of color as being essential to ending police violence.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

The worldwide demonstrations of the last two weeks have been in protest of police brutality. And yet, they have delivered images from across the U.S. of police acting brutally against unarmed people in the midst of the protests. 

Lamont Makes A Father’s Day Gesture To Restaurants

Jun 5, 2020
Diners on the patio of Mondo’s in Middletown on May 20, the first day restaurants were allowed to open for outdoor dining.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont, whose administration has been facing intense lobbying by the restaurant industry over COVID-19 restrictions, made a modest concession Friday by allowing indoor dining on June 17, three days ahead of the previously scheduled second phase of reopening on June 20.

COVID-19 testing at the Urgent Care Center of Connecticut on March 25, 2020 in Bloomfield, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Towns and cities facing mounting costs associated with COVID-19 will get some help as they close out their budgets for the fiscal year. The state also announced Thursday that unemployment remains at historic highs, though new weekly claims are slowing.

Gov. Ned Lamont said $75 million has been allocated for the creation of a Connecticut Municipal Coronavirus Relief Fund Program to help towns and cities cover costs associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. 

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In the wake of the killing of George Floyd, theater companies in Connecticut are promising to do more to deal with racial injustice in their communities and within their own workplaces.

Office of the Chief State's Attorney

In his resignation letter submitted to the Wethersfield Police Department, Layau Eulizier Jr. wrote that he never thought the day he shot and killed 18-year-old Anthony Jose Vega Cruz would be his last on active patrol in Wethersfield.

Cucamelons grow the size of a cherry tomato and are striped like watermelons.
Page (Flickr / Creative Commons)

Cucumbers are one of those staple vegetable garden crops everyone grows. Most gardeners are familiar with the green slicing cucumbers and pickling cucumbers. But, if you have a little extra room in your veggie garden this spring, try some unusual cukes. You'll be surprised by their color, texture and taste.

The Death Of George Floyd: A Moment, Or A Movement?

Jun 3, 2020
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Six pallbearers, all black men wearing white gloves and cloth masks, met the hearse. One, a pastor in black and gold clerical robes, raised a clenched right fist as he helped carry the steel-gray casket Wednesday to a bier outside the Connecticut Capitol in Hartford.

The casket was empty. George Floyd — the man they had come to mourn, whose death they had come to protest — lay dead in Minneapolis, some 1,300 miles away. 

HARTFORD, CT- May 12,2020: Monique Coleman receives a COVID-19 test at a newly opened mobile testing center in the north end of Hartford.
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

State and social service leaders announced a new public-private program Wednesday to help undocumented immigrants through economic hardships caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Later in the day, education officials announced that in-person high school graduations, with graduates able to sit together, can begin in July.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

There’s long been good evidence for the premise that racism is bad for your health. And that truth stands whether you’re the victim or the perpetrator. In light of both the racial disparities of the coronavirus pandemic and the momentous events in the wake of George Floyd’s death, Connecticut Public Radio’s All Things Considered host, John Henry Smith, spoke with Dr. Cato T. Laurencin, a professor of orthopedic surgery at UConn. 

Connecticut Provides Coronavirus Assistance For Undocumented Residents

Jun 3, 2020
Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

Gov. Ned Lamont struck a partnership Wednesday with critics in the immigrant-rights community, promising $3.5 million in state and philanthropic dollars to help undocumented families ineligible for federal pandemic relief.

COVID Testing Ordered For All Nursing Home, Assisted Living Center Staff

Jun 2, 2020
Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

After weeks of controversy over inadequate COVID-19 testing at nursing homes, Gov. Ned Lamont has ordered mandatory testing of all staff and residents at nursing homes, assisted living facilities and elderly residential communities.

Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public Radio

Right now, the state of Connecticut says restaurants could be allowed to resume indoor service on June 20. But some restaurant owners are pushing for inside dining as soon as this week.

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