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Bridgeport Can Learn From Springfield's Revitalization

Aug 18, 2019
Brian A. Pounds / Hearst Connecticut Media

To the world outside its borders, Bridgeport doesn’t have a sterling reputation.

On those rare occasions when it’s referenced in popular culture, it’s in a less than flattering light — like the “Family Guy” episode that ridiculed Bridgeport as “among the world leaders in abandoned buildings, shattered glass, boarded-up windows, wild dogs and gas stations without pumps.” 

Sources: Vineyard Wind Decision Delayed Until December 2020

Aug 18, 2019
Nadine Sebai / The Public's Radio

Final approval for the Vineyard Wind Project will likely not happen for at least another 18 months, according to information received from multiple sources by The Public’s Radio. This means the country’s first large scale offshore wind farm won’t begin construction in time to take advantage of a lucrative federal tax credit that expires at the end of the year. 

Audit: Mass. RMV Saw Conn. Notice About Driver Before Fatal N.H. Crash

Aug 18, 2019
Jesse Costa / WBUR

Almost two months before a Massachusetts man allegedly killed seven people in a crash, a Registry of Motor Vehicles employee opened an alert from Connecticut warning that the driver had refused a chemical test during a traffic stop. 

Charles Reed / U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP

Connecticut residents held in ICE detention suddenly have hearings scheduled hours away in Boston immigration court, rather than in Hartford. Immigration lawyers and U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut want answers. 

Dave Collins / Associated Press

Of the 224 patients held at Whiting Forensic Hospital on June 28, a little more than half were hospitalized after being found not guilty of a crime by reason of insanity.

The remaining patients at the state’s maximum security psychiatric hospital faced no criminal charges and were civilly committed, or were there to be restored to competency so their criminal cases could be resolved. 

CPA

The Secretary of the State’s office is defending Deputy Secretary Scott Bates as evidence grows about his role in questionable decisions at the Connecticut Port Authority.

Ray Hardman / Connecticut Public Radio

Monarch butterflies famously migrate to Mexico in the winter, traveling along well established routes. One of those routes runs along the shoreline of Connecticut. An organic gardener whose mission is to increase the population of migrating monarchs will be in New Haven this weekend to show people how to raise and release these amazing creatures.

Connecticut's Jobless Rate Shrinks To 3.6 Percent In July

Aug 15, 2019
neetalparekh via flickr.com / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s unemployment rate dropped by slightly to 3.6 percent in July despite the loss of 100 jobs, the Department of Labor reported Thursday. That’s because the labor department also revised June job losses from 1,400 positions lost to just 800. 

A garden after the first freeze.
woodleywonderworks (Flickr) / Creative Commons

I've been rereading an old classic, 1973 gardening book by a former Redding, Connecticut resident Ruth Stout. In her book, No Work Gardening, she touts using deep layers of organic mulches as the solution to pretty much everything in the garden. She uses deep mulching for weed control, fertility management, and pest control and got huge yields with little work. Ruth passed many years ago, but her book got me thinking about simplifying my garden work.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Just ahead of a new school year, hundreds of families gathered in Hartford for CREC’s fifth annual Back to School Block Party.

The event has quickly become a community favorite, offering free ice cream and hot dogs, along with other items like water bottles and books. 

Consensus Elusive On Election Security

Aug 14, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s current system of casting and counting votes has its roots in the chaotic presidential election of 2000. With the winner unclear for a month, it was a frightening moment in U.S. politics that led to a bipartisan consensus about the need to maintain confidence in the integrity of elections. 

John Voci / NEPR

After 50 years, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair is remembered for the crowd of some 450,000, the fields of mud from the intermittent rain, the historic rock 'n' roll performances by musicians that went on to become legends, and the festival’s logo: a white bird perched on a blue and green guitar neck against a red background. 

A phone with social media apps
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A state lawmaker says a 9-year-old Connecticut girl was recently a target of child exploitation after downloading a popular social media app.

Lori Mack / WNPR

The governor and leaders of immigrant, labor and health-care organizations were all voicing opposition Tuesday to a Trump Administration rule they say will penalize legal immigrants who rely on food stamps, housing assistance, school lunch and other government social programs. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Marion Bradley always knew that getting breast cancer was a possibility. After all, she had a family history of the disease, so she wasn’t shocked when she was diagnosed with an early stage of the cancer about five years ago.

But that didn’t make it any less scary.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

New Haven Police say they don’t yet know the whereabouts of a suspect who shot one of their officers. A police captain who reportedly tried to intervene in a shooting near the corner of Dixwell Avenue and Henry Street Monday night is in recovery after he was seriously injured.

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s dairy farmers are ending their fifth year of financial decline and there does not seem to be an end in sight. That was the picture being presented to the legislative rural caucus on Tuesday as dairy farmers from across the state expressed the industry’s need for more financial support.

Interim Police Chief Otoniel Reyes speaks to reporters outside Yale New Haven Hospital to provide an update on Capt. Anthony Duff, who was shot Monday night.
Thomas Breen / New Haven Independent

A search is underway for the man suspected of shooting a New Haven police captain and fatally shooting another man Monday night. 

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

Thirty-one children have died around the country so far this year as a result of being left alone in hot cars. Senator Richard Blumenthal is endorsing a bill aimed at preventing these deaths. He said Monday the proposed law will require all auto manufacturers to include technology that alerts drivers to check the rear seat for passengers when a vehicle is turned off. 

SCANTAUR / Istock/Thinkstock

Plaintiffs in a nationwide class-action lawsuit are challenging how Medicare pays out for health coverage of hospitalizations and related rehabilitative services.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Representative John Larson took to the banks of the Connecticut River Monday to promote federal legislation he said will strengthen roads and bridges while taxing polluters and providing rebates to American taxpayers. 

Santa Clara Weekly / Facebook

An accident earlier this summer at Bradley International Airport caused thousands of gallons of toxic chemicals to spill into the Farmington River. The aviation support company responsible for that accident was also involved in a similar incident in California in 2016.

In June, a faulty manual fire alarm in an airplane hangar at Bradley triggered the release of firefighting foam containing PFAS, a group of chemicals that are highly toxic, and hard to remove from the environment. An estimated 50,000 gallons of the foam eventually made its way into the Farmington River.

Gov. Ned Lamont delivered his first budget address to the legislature on February 20, 2019.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont is out of the office.

“He’s been gone since Friday,” Max Reiss, his spokesman, said on Sunday. “His family takes a summer trip to Maine. Some years it’s been as long as a month that they go up there. This year he’s taking two weeks.”

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

There’s a new initiative in Hartford aimed at exposing area teenagers to careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

New Haven police announced the arrest Saturday of a man from Orange for allegedly making an implied threat of gun violence on social media aimed at the city’s Puerto Rican Festival.

Jeffrey Hanson, 53, was charged with second-degree breach of peace. He was released after posting $50,000 bond, according to police. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The former chair of the Connecticut Port Authority has resigned. Scott Bates is just the latest member of the quasi-public to leave amid scandals about how the agency spent taxpayer money.

RMS Companies

A judge has cleared the way for the redevelopment of property surrounding the Hartford baseball stadium of the minor league Yard Goats.

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

The annual Podunk Bluegrass Festival is kicking off for the 23rd year this weekend in Goshen, and festival goers from all over New England have loaded up their RV’s to camp out on the lawn and enjoy artists from across the country.

Connecticut Department of Energy and Enviromental Protection

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong says the state is working aggressively to deal with toxic chemicals known as PFAS in the Farmington River. In June, thousands of gallons of the chemicals were accidentally released into the Farmington near Bradley International airport.

On Thursday, Tong was joined by legislators and environmental officials at the banks of the Farmington River in Windsor near where the spill originated. He said before any action is taken, the state needs more information.

State Gun Groups Aren't Happy Trump Is Supporting Red Flag Laws

Aug 8, 2019
Official White House Photo by Andrea Hanks / Flickr

President Donald Trump likes getting a reaction from his base, though maybe not the one he’s getting this week. After Trump expressed support for certain gun control measures, some of his staunchest allies in the gun rights community say they may abandon a man they once saw as their best hope for expanding gun rights.

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