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Tomato seedlings
JP Goguen (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Tomatoes are the most popular home garden vegetable for good reason. They're easy to grow and there are tons of varieties. Tomato varieties range from tiny plants like 'Micro Tom' to monsters like 'Giant Belgium'. But if you want to experiment with growing novel tomato varieties you're probably going to have to grow them from seed. So here's a refresher on growing tomato seeds indoors.

Auditors Fault DECD's Handling Of Loans and Grants

Mar 4, 2020
Mark Pazniokas / CT Mirror

State auditors reported Wednesday that the state Department of Community and Economic Development ignored or misinterpreted state law in administering millions in grants and loans during the administration of Gov. Dannel P. Malloy.

The legislature’s bipartisan Auditors of Public Accounts highlighted grants to two unidentified companies: one that received $16 million, when it was eligible for $10 million; and another that was granted $20 million, when it qualified for $10 million.

guns
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s red flag law could see significant changes through a new bill that would update a statute that’s been on the books since 1999. 

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

The nonprofit organization representing Connecticut’s 169 municipalities says more cooperation is needed to manage environmental fallout from a family of contaminants that have remained in products for decades.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Talks between the governor’s office and the state’s two federally recognized tribes over the rights to sports betting are at an impasse.

overhead power lines
Karim D. Ghantous / Creative Commons

More than 100,000 Connecticut consumers could soon see a refund on their electric bills if they used a third-party electric supplier.

earthquake puerto rico
Carlos Giusti / Associated Press

Connecticut has released more funding to help evacuees from Puerto Rico -- but the state isn’t recommending that people call 211 to connect with the aid.

The state is making $75,000 available to help evacuees with housing costs. It comes after a recent string of earthquakes on the island that led to an uptick in people coming to Connecticut.

ncaa saint jospeh student athletes
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Jim Calhoun-led men’s basketball team from the University of Saint Joseph has made it to the NCAA Division III Tournament for the first time. The program is only 2 years old.

us surgeon general
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

As the number of COVID-19 cases rises in the United States amid a global outbreak of a novel coronavirus, both federal and state health officials urge communities to prepare for the spread of disease.

U.S. Surgeon General Vice Adm. Jerome M. Adams met with state leaders and health officials Monday at the Connecticut Department of Public Health Laboratory in Rocky Hill. 

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

The Metropolitan District Commission approved a controversial water discount for high-volume users Monday night. Right now, the measure stands to benefit only one customer: Niagara Bottling, a bottled water company.

Lamont Administration Makes Its Push For Pot

Mar 2, 2020
Chion Wolf / WNPR

With closely choreographed public-hearing testimony by agency heads and other officials, the administration of Gov. Ned Lamont delivered a broad overview Monday of the complexities involved in trying to legalize and regulate the sale of recreational marijuana in Connecticut.

New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker
Tucker Ives / Connecticut Public Radio

In his first budget proposal as mayor of New Haven, Justin Elicker is proposing a tax hike for residents, cuts to vacant positions, a restructuring of city departments and a plea to Yale. 

Joe Tasca / The Public's Radio

A 40-year old Rhode Island man who became the first resident to test “presumptively positive” for the coronavirus following a school trip to Europe in mid-February remains hospitalized in stable condition, state health officials said Monday morning.

lab test
Huntstock / Thinkstock

Rhode Island public health officials say they've identified the state's first and second positive cases of the new coronavirus disease. The Rhode Island Department of Health announced Sunday that an unidentified man in his 40s and a teenager who both had traveled to Europe in mid-February tested positive for the virus.

reservoir
Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

The Metropolitan District Commission is slated to vote Monday night on a water proposal that would give a discount to its biggest customer, a bottled water company. 

researcher facility
Jackie Filson / Connecticut Public Radio

Scientists in Meriden are working on a vaccine to protect against COVID-19.

Protein Sciences said its COVID-19 research will be based on a vaccine candidate produced in Meriden in the early 2000s to combat SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome).

Celery
John Sheldon (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Celery is an ancient and trendy vegetable. Wild versions from the Mediterranean, were used medicinally in 850 BC. Relatives of celery, though, can be found around the world. The Italians started growing it as a vegetable in the 17th century creating taller stalks that weren't as strongly flavored. Today, celery-based smoothies are popular for detoxing the body.

Mounds Succeeds Drajewicz As Lamont's Chief Of Staff

Feb 28, 2020
Ryan Drajewicz with Gov. Ned Lamont as they announce Drajewicz's exit as chief of staff.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

One of Gov. Ned Lamont’s highest-profile recruits from the private sector, Ryan Drajewicz, is leaving the administration after 13 months as the governor’s chief of staff, a long-rumored departure resulting in a reshuffling of two other appointees, Paul Mounds and Josh Geballe.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

A state bill that would levy a 35% excise tax on ammunition purchases drew a large crowd at a public hearing at the state Capitol Thursday. 

Ana Radelat / CT Mirror

Sens. Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy joined Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer Thursday in crossing the Capitol to join House members in condemning Congress’ continued failure to approve new gun laws, even as the number of mass shootings, and other gun violence, is on the rise.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut officials and health experts say it’s only a matter of time before the global outbreak of a novel coronavirus reaches local communities in the state, but Gov. Ned Lamont said Wednesday the state is ready.

mike casey
Courtesy: Mike Casey

Jazz saxophonist Mike Casey returns to his old Connecticut stomping grounds for a performance in Old Lyme this week. The performance coincides with the release of two new singles. 

solar panel
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

If you rent or can’t put solar panels on your roof but you want to support solar energy, you can subscribe to what’s called “shared solar” and get a credit to lower your electric bill. But regulators in Connecticut say the state’s two biggest electric utilities are dragging their feet on developing rules for the program.

Renty -- an enslaved man whose photograph was commissioned by Harvard professor Louis Agassiz in 1850.
Courtesy of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University

When Tamara Lanier’s mother died in 2010, the Norwich, Connecticut, resident remembered a promise she made to her: to document who her ancestors were.

Lanier says she grew up hearing her mother’s stories about her great-great-great grandfather, Papa Renty, an African-born enslaved man in South Carolina.

Interstate Railfan / Wikimedia Commons

Connecticut paid thousands of dollars to upgrade the old train cars it leased from Massachusetts to revive the Hartford Rail Line. Now Massachusetts wants them back.

The rail service between New Haven and Springfield almost did not launch on time in 2018. Connecticut lacked the cash to buy new rail cars, so the state leased 30-year-old cars from Massachusetts instead.

solitary confinement cell replica
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A replica of a solitary confinement cell was displayed in the lobby of the Connecticut state Capitol Tuesday as part of an effort to reform the state’s prison system.

Legislators and visitors are encouraged to go inside the 10-by-12-foot cell, which aims to give people an idea of what solitary confinement might be like. It’s the second time in two years the cell has been at the Capitol as part of a campaign to change the practice. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

It was just a year ago that Eli Terris of Hamden was diagnosed at 30 years old with Type 1 diabetes, a lifelong chronic disease that requires a medication called insulin.

And the hardest part for him? Having to navigate health insurance and the costs for his disease treatment. 

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A group of activists gathered Sunday in front of the Cheshire Correctional Institution to hold a vigil for incarcerated people who are being held in isolation.

They’re part of the Stop Solitary CT campaign, which is pushing for legislation this session to abolish the use of solitary confinement. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Amid pushback from Republicans and thousands of outraged parents, the legislature’s Public Health Committee voted Monday to advance a bill that would ban religious exemptions to mandatory immunizations in Connecticut.

twojciac / Creative Commons

This year residents of Waterbury could be seeing a number of trees trimmed or removed. That’s because nearly 170 miles of city streets are slated to be targeted by tree trimming crews from Eversource, the state’s largest utility.

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