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In the years since they flew together out of Westover Air Force Base in Massachusetts in the post-Vietnam War era, Wes Carter and Paul Bailey have stayed in close touch, swapping information about families, jobs, and their former crewmates in the 74th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron.

This year, the conversation took a strange turn: Bailey, who lives in New Hampshire, was diagnosed with prostate cancer in February. Two months later, Carter, a former Massachusetts resident who now lives in Oregon, got the same diagnosis.

stevendepolo, flickr

Last weeky we did a whole show about sugar.  We talked to author Gary Taubes who wrote an article for New York Times titled “Is Sugar Toxic?” After talking with him awhile, it seems as though he and the scientists he quoted had made a conclusion.  Their answer is “yes.”  

But we had a few listeners who weren't happy with Taubes’ claims. Today we get a response from The Sugar Association.

New Haven Food Truck Makes Its Rounds

Aug 22, 2011
Tim Cipriano

A mobile food truck is roaming the streets of New Haven this summer, handing out free meals to students from low income neighborhoods. The truck is reaching kids who might not otherwise get a healthy meal.  

The Betsy Ross School in New Haven is empty -- kids are out for the summer. But the parking lot outside -- that's buzzing. The New Haven School Food Truck has arrived.

Scared Sick

Aug 19, 2011

All the news about health and medicine we’re exposed to might lead some to healthier lifestyles...but to some people, all this information can cause a problem.

For hypochondriacs, a little knowledge about health and medicine can lead to a fear of everything that can possibly go wrong with their bodies.

Photo by Mykl Roventine (Flickr)

How much sugar do you eat? The U.S.D.A. estimates the average American consumes more than 3,500 pounds of sugar in their lifetime.

Sugar seems to be in or on everything. Cereal, coffee, yogurt, candy, ketchup and of course...soda. It certainly affects our health, and is seen as the main culprit in “epidemics” of obesity and diabetes.

But sugar has also impacted the course of history, changed the fate of empires, and affected millions.

Flickr Creative Commons, Monica's Dad

The famine in the Horn of Africa is getting worse by the day.

Somalia is suffering deeply from the 3 year drought with more than 3.5 million Somalis facing starvation.

An estimated 600,000 of the starving are children.

Disaster relief organization, AmeriCares - based in  Stamford, CT - recently shipped emergency aid to Somalia. Inside the shipment are enough medical supplies to care for roughly 15,000 people.

Flickr Creative Commons, eviltomthai

All of us know migraine sufferers.

Four Failing Lungs

Jul 27, 2011
spec-ta-cles

In 2010, there were 1,770 lung transplants performed in the United States -- the most ever in a single year.

For a person with Cystic Fibrosis, the transplant may extend life by years – or it could lead to continued suffering and rejection of the new organ.

Later in the program, we'll hear about the latest research into lung transplants and even artificial lungs.  But first we hear a documentary about two young people struggling with end-stage Cystic Fibrosis, and struggling with a decision about transplant.

"Model Workplaces" in Connecticut Not Always Safest

Jul 25, 2011
All rights reserved by LetMeTakeYourFotograf

In February 2007, David Gootkin came to the state Capitol in Hartford to testify in favor a bill prompted by his brother Robert’s death the year before at Covanta’s waste-to-energy plant in Wallingford. The bill, which eventually was adopted, requires that operators of solid waste facilities have at least two employees or a camera in the work area when waste is being fed into a hopper.

Big City Violence

Jul 14, 2011
Chion Wolf

The number of violent crimes in the US dropped significantly last year to the lowest rate in 40 years.

But then why haven’t Connecticut cities like Hartford and New Haven been able to join this trend?  

Tara Gulwell, Creative Commons

Here’s the misperception: Eating disorders affect white, middle and upper class women.  A new study says, “not true.”  

The study, published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, finds that Native American women are just as likely to suffer from binging and purging as white women.

vizzzual

Thirty years ago, food allergy was extremely rare. Today, about 5.9 million U.S. children under 18 suffer from this potentially life-threatening condition.

That’s 1 in every 13 children. Or, to look at it another way, one student per classroom has a food allergy. What’s more, nearly 2 out of every 5 affected children suffer from a severe food-allergy.

Many veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan have suffered some type of brain injury. In 2009, the U.S Department of Defense found up to 90,000 troops had traumatic brain injuries. They require specialized care to regain such skills as concentration and memory. As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the VA hospital in Connecticut is one of several in the country that will participate in a clinical trial to help these veterans.

woodleywonderworks

We are all shaped by our genetic inheritance and by the environment we live in. Indeed, the argument about which of these two forces, nature or nurture, predominates has been raging for decades. But what about our very first environment—the prenatal world where we exist for nine months between conception and birth and where we are more vulnerable than at any other point in our lives?

The Science of Song

Jun 10, 2011
Horia Varlan, Creative Commons

Courtesy of Flickr CC By Laughing Squid

A marijuana decriminalization bill is headed to the Governor's desk.  As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the state Legislature approved a measure where adults will face a fine instead of jail time for possessing a half-ounce or less of pot.

Brittany G, Creative Commons

Doctors get years of training in medicine, but what’s often left out is humanity.

The relationship between doctor and patient is among the most important many of us will have in their lives, yet it’s becoming increasingly depersonalized thanks to overwhelming patient loads.

But there’s a growing field of study - and practice - that aims at putting the humanities back into doctor’s training...to better treat the humans they serve.

Creative Commons

The legislative session ends next Wednesday, June 8, and there are dozens of bills that lawmakers have yet to take up. One bill that has bi-partisan support this year is a proposal to legalize medical marijuana. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports

The General Assembly passed a medical marijuana bill in 2007 only to see then-Governor Jodi Rell veto it. This year's proposal is similar; the bill would allow patients with certain debilitating medical conditions to obtain a prescription for small amounts of marijuana for palliative use.

Poisoned By Food

Jun 2, 2011
Creative Commons

E. coli, Salmonella, Listeria, Cyclospora - All bacteria that have caused food borne illnesses and deaths in the past decades.

How do we heal difficult relationships and nurture healthy ones?  What is the significance of relationships in our spiritual life?  In his book, John E. Welshons says:  

Health Premiums Double In Decade

Jun 1, 2011

Connecticut’s private employers have seen the price of health insurance premiums for workers and their families rise 102 percent since 1999, an analysis by C-HIT shows. The amount that families pay for this coverage rose an even steeper 107 percent.

The increases came during a decade when median household income in Connecticut grew by less than one third.

C-HIT’s review also found wide geographic variations in the insurance premiums charged for Connecticut families. 

Photo by Chion Wolf

When you hear about the human trafficking of young girls and women, third world countries in Asia and South America come to mind but law enforcement officials and advocates against exploitation say its as pervasive in this country as overseas. On VanityFair.com, writer Anne Fine Collins profiles a Connecticut case that was one of the first to be tried under the federal Trafficking Victims Protection Act.

Last year, restaurants in New York City were required to post a letter grade that summarized their health inspection results.  Now, the City of Hartford may do the same thing. The new plan wouldn't change the restaurant inspection process or requirements.  It also wouldn't apply to food trucks, school lunchrooms, jails, soup kitchens or hospital cafeterias. 

Elana Amsterdam is back on The Food Schmooze.  Her book of recipes using high protein almond flour in place of white flour was a hit with us and our regular Food Schmooze listeners. So we invited Elana to join us again to talk about some of her recipe ideas.

We'll tell you all about why blanched almond flour is considered a superfood by some; how it differs from white wheat flour and how it registers on the glycemic index.

Nate Ferdinandt

An emotional debate concerning proposed changes to regulations governing nonprofit hospice care. We look at what those changes would mean for the patients.

Nate Ferdinandt

An emotional debate concerning proposed changes to regulations governing nonprofit hospice care. We look at what those changes would mean for the patients.

Flickr user superde1uxe

A new Yale University study has pinpointed the types of riders involved in motorcycle accidents. Researchers think the data could be used to justify a mandatory helmet law in the state.

Adam Landman is an emergency room doctor at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He says he's tired of seeing motorcycle crash victims.

"My goal would be to go out of business," Landman says. "I don't want to be taking care of crash victims in the emergency department."

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