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Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Faltando dos días para la ceremonia de graduación, Karina Lasalle Arroyo había sacado el equipaje, con un valor de casi siete meses de su permanencia en Connecticut.

WNPR/David DesRoches

The state Department of Education has voted to consider closing a charter school in Willimantic, after the department found several problems with how the school has been managed. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

UConn President Susan Herbst has announced she will step down after the 2018-19 academic year. Herbst, who has led the state's flagship university since 2011, did not give a reason for her decision in a message to the university community, only saying she felt it was the "right time for a change." 

School Regionalization Results Mixed, Study Review Says

May 20, 2018
ccarlstead / Creative Commons

As Connecticut schools deal with shrinking enrollment in most towns and rising enrollment in some cities, the question being asked is this -- should schools be consolidated? 

Making Her Story: Carolyn Miles

May 18, 2018
Catherine Boyce

This hour, Save the Children U.S. President and CEO Carolyn Miles joins us. We talk about her decades-long career and learn about the unconventional journey that led her to the Fairfield-based NGO.

It’s the latest conversation in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series, featuring prominent women with ties to the state. 

Eastern Connecticut State University

Professors in the state university system say their voices aren't being heard, and they want more input as the college system deals with a growing budget deficit.

Late spring is graduation season for schools across the United States. It's a time of joy and hope for many, but for DACA recipients and their families it can bring added anxiety. For many of these "DREAMers," the threat of deportation looms over their graduation celebrations.

NPR's Scott Simon spoke with Jessica Moreno-Caycho, a DREAMer graduating this May from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Moreno-Caycho said she came with her family to the United States from Peru in 2003. She was 8 years old when she arrived.

Home School Parents Say Regulations Are Not The Answer

May 9, 2018
WNPR/David DesRoches

For Erin Ring-Howell, home schooling her two kids was a practical choice.

Aaron Burden / Creative Commons

Connecticut families who choose to home-school their children are not required to show that their kids are actually learning anything. A new report from the state's Office of the Child Advocate found that holes in the system make it hard to track home-schooled kids who are abused and neglected.

ccarlstead / Creative Commons

West Virginia, Oklahoma, Arizona. Across the country, teachers have been striking for better wages. This hour, we talk about the challenges facing public school teachers nationwide and here in Connecticut. Have we invested enough in the professionals who educate the next generation?

Bulkeley High School senior Yeicy Alejandro, smiling at left, talks to her new mentors from Central Connecticut State University. They're in the new "Ambassadors" program - Puerto Rican evacuees helping other students displaced by Hurricane Maria.
Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Communications major Marivelisse Acosta attends Central Connecticut State University. But on Wednesday night, she stood in the cafeteria of Hartford’s Bulkeley High School, contemplating what to say as a mentor to the school’s displaced students from Puerto Rico.

David DesRoches / WNPR

New guidelines have been developed by Connecticut's education department that describe the process parents should use for their children to be evaluated for special education services. But concerns are being raised that the new guidelines would make it harder for parents, not easier, than under previous guidance. 

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

La especialista en comunicaciones Marivelisse Acosta asiste a la Universidad Estatal Central de Connecticut. Pero el miércoles en la noche, estuvo en la cafetería de la Secundaria Bulkeley de Hartford, reflexionando sobre qué decir como tutora a los estudiantes de la escuela desplazados desde Puerto Rico.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A sprightly “Good morning!” awaited students and parents who approached Sanchez Elementary School on the Friday before spring break.

Maybe the school staff was in an extra good mood? But Merelys Torres, secretary of Sanchez’s parent-teacher organization, said it’s like this every morning. She noticed it right away when her family came to Hartford from Puerto Rico last fall — a sensitive time for her two kids.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Un animado "¡Buenos días!" esperaba a estudiantes y padres que se acercaban a la Escuela Primaria Sánchez el viernes antes de las vacaciones de primavera.

At schools across the country today, students are getting up from their desks and walking out when the clock strikes 10 a.m. They're participating in the National School Walkout, part of the movement that has taken hold among students to call for action to end gun violence.

Today marks 19 years since the shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in which two high school students shot and killed thirteen people.

Werwin15, Creative Commons

Connecticut's graduation rate is now the highest on record, state officials said Monday. Last year, 87.9 percent of high school seniors graduated. That's about five points higher than the national average. The graduation rate gap between students of color and white students also shrank.

College of DuPage / Creative Commons

A large number of Connecticut high school graduates don't get a college degree within six years of leaving high school. But there's not a lot of information on what they're actually up to.

"I'm 54 years old and my paycheck is $1,980 [a month]. I can't afford f****** health insurance."

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The system that oversees private special education schools in Connecticut needs an overhaul, according to a recent state audit. About 3,000 students with severe needs are currently placed in these schools, mostly at the expense of public school districts.

Students in Hartford join the national walkout over gun violence.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly said that district administrators in Stonington did not respond to a request for comment. In fact, Stonington High School Principal Mark Friese responded to WNPR in an email before the story was published, and he provided his account of the day’s events, which is now included.

Stonington High School junior Caroline Morehouse was excited when she learned that her school would allow students to walkout of class to protest gun violence in a nationwide day of action on March 14. She'd be standing in solidarity with students from Parkland, Florida, who only a month earlier had lost 17 classmates in yet another school shooting.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s lunchtime at Central Connecticut State University and 10 students converge on their usual spot in the dining hall. They start talking about the food — and it becomes clear that they don’t love the rice. They explain that it’s not as seasoned as the homemade arroz in Puerto Rico.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Es la hora del almuerzo en la Universidad Estatal Central de Connecticut y 10 estudiantes se reúnen es su lugar habitual del comedor. Empiezan a hablar sobre la comida y se hace evidente que no les gusta mucho el arroz. Explican que no está sazonado como el arroz casero de Puerto Rico.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s mid-March and Hartford Public High School teacher Bridget Allison goes over essay-writing tips for her fourth-period class. After a while, she checks in on a group of students who are seated together — a few of the evacuees from Puerto Rico.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Es mediado de marzo y la profesora de la Secundaria Pública de Hartford, Bridget Allison, repasa las pautas para redacción de ensayos en su cuarto período de clase. Luego de un rato, confirma con un grupo de estudiantes que se sientan juntos, unos pocos evacuados de Puerto Rico.

jasastyle/iStock / Thinkstock

Teachers from across Connecticut convened at the state Capitol on Friday, asking lawmakers to not increase their pension obligations. Teachers call it the "teacher tax,” and they said it’s asking them to fix a system broken by years of under-funding by the state.

Connecticut School Districts Prepare For Student Walkouts

Mar 13, 2018
Students rally outside the White House after the  Parkland school shooting.
Lorie Shaull / Creative Commons

Students will be walking out of schools across Connecticut Wednesday to express their concerns about gun violence. School districts around the state have been responding to the effort in different ways. 

Wednesday morning, at 10 o'clock, students at schools across the country will walk out of their classrooms. The plan is for them to leave school — or at least gather in the hallway — for 17 minutes. That's one minute for each of the victims in last month's school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

The walkout has galvanized teens nationwide and raised big questions for schools about how to handle protests.

"Why have you become, people say, the most hated Cabinet secretary?" Lesley Stahl asked Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in a 60 Minutes interview that is drawing lots of attention.

"I'm not so sure how exactly that happened," DeVos responded in the interview, which aired Sunday night on CBS.

Pixabay / Creative Commons

Connecticut has spent over $50 million helping schools beef up security since 2013. Some of that money -- $3.2 million -- has gone to private schools, which are reimbursed at a higher rate than many public schools.

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