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Hartford Hawks men's basketball
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The University of Hartford has decided that its athletic programs will move down from Division I to Division III competition. While the school has said it hopes to reap millions in cost savings, many students and supporters are crying foul. Temple University sports economist Michael Leeds joined All Things Considered to talk about whether this move make sense.

There were zero reported deaths from college hazing incidents in 2020, but as campuses reopen to students, there have already been two hazing-related deaths this year. Eight men face a range of charges, including involuntary manslaughter, reckless homicide, evidence tampering and failure to comply with underage alcohol laws, after Stone Foltz, a sophomore at Bowling Green State University, died on March 7 of alcohol poisoning.

Ken Teegardin / Wikimedia Commons

Ever wonder why you were required to learn algebra, but not how to balance a checkbook and file your taxes? Although personal finance and accounting are offered as an elective in many high schools, they're not often required for graduation.

vastateparkstaff / Wikimedia Commons

Another school year in a pandemic is winding down. That means parents have been thinking about summer plans like summer camps.

The Lamont administration has said it will invest COVID-19 relief money to make summer camp experiences accessible to all Connecticut students.

This hour, we talk with a camp director and hear from state agencies that serve kids.

The nation's largest HBCU is having a blockbuster year for fundraising. North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro has raised $88 million since its fiscal year began last summer. That's almost six times what the university typically fundraises annually — and the fiscal year isn't even over yet.

"There has not been a year like that ever in our history," says Todd Simmons, N.C. A&T's associate vice chancellor for university relations. "Nor has there been a year like that in the history of nearly any other public HBCU in America."

Cheryl Holt / Pixabay

It has been over eight years since Sheryl Sandberg’s breakthrough book Lean In hit the shelfs and started a conversation about women leading in the workplace. But sexism is far from obsolete in today’s job market. 

Pixabay

Broadband access is not just a convenience, it’s essential for life under COVID-19. 

This hour, we take a look at Connecticut’s digital divide. We talk with a researcher whose report highlights the stark racial and economic disparities in internet access in our state.

Governor Lamont has proposed universal broadband by September 2022. But is the state taking strong enough steps to put all residents on an equal footing when it comes to internet access?

Eastern Connecticut State University

Eastern Connecticut State University has hired an independent firm to review the way it handles Title IX claims. Risk management firm TNG Consulting will look into claims by several students that the school has mishandled cases of rape and sexual assault on campus.

During his first news conference, President Biden said Thursday that his administration is on track to keep a promise he made to the nation's parents and caregivers: to reopen the majority of elementary and middle schools for full-time, in-person learning within his first 100 days in office.

Frustration As Waterbury Catholic School Set To Close

Mar 25, 2021
Olivia Hickey

Sacred Heart High School and Middle School are scheduled to close June 30 after educating students for 99 years. While some families are preparing to transfer their children to new schools, alumni and school community members have been working together to prevent the closing.

Updated March 23, 2021 at 10:51 AM ET

In a year when so much about schooling has changed, add this to the list: A significant increase in the number of households where students were homeschooled.

That's according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau's Household Pulse Survey, an online survey that asks questions about how the pandemic is changing life in U.S. homes.

The U.S. Department of Education announced Thursday it is scrapping a controversial formula, championed by former Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, that granted only partial student loan relief to borrowers who were defrauded by private, for-profit colleges. It will instead adopt what it's calling a "streamlined approach" for granting borrowers full relief.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The pandemic has redefined what it’s like to go to college. With the focus shifted to virtual learning, students missed out on traditional class discussions and social activities -- familiar and beloved parts of the college lifestyle. As a result, many assumed higher education would take a hit. 

 

But application rates for 2021 are showing signs of hope. Some universities, like the University of Connecticut, are even seeing record interest. 

Thousands Of Students Didn’t Show Up For School This Year. Where Are The Children?

Mar 15, 2021

On his first day as the nation’s education secretary, Miguel Cardona claimed the spotlight as he and first lady Jill Biden toured an elementary school in his hometown, about one year after COVID-19 first disrupted the lives of students, teachers and parents.

Courtesy: Sheree Baldwin Muhammad

Teachers across Connecticut have started to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. And while vaccination brings a sense of hope, it doesn’t erase the traumas they and their students have experienced over the last year of teaching -- a time when many educators had to reinvent what it meant to be in school. 

Bobby is a sixth grader at North Brookfield Elementary School in western Massachusetts. He's crazy about the Loch Ness monster. He's into math and Minecraft. And he likes online learning.

"It's a lot easier to focus," he says. "I can be in my room and be a lot more comfortable doing stuff."

President Biden has said that his goal is to have the majority of K-8 schools operating in-person by the end of his first 100 days in office.

Sheree Baldwin Muhammad, teacher at New Beginnings Family Academy

Starting this week, teachers and child care providers are now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine. 

This hour, we talk with three Connecticut teachers and hear about what this past year has looked like for them and their students. 

As The Push To Reopen Schools Intensifies, Miguel Cardona And Jill Biden Travel To Meriden

Mar 3, 2021
Pool/New York Times

On his first day on the job as U.S. secretary of education, Meriden’s Miguel Cardona traveled back to his hometown to showcase for the nation, alongside first lady Jill Biden and the leader of one of the nation’s largest teachers unions, how the district where he spent his career opened its schools for students to learn in-person and full-time amid the pandemic.

Report: Twice As Many Conn. High Schoolers Are In Danger Of Being Held Back

Feb 22, 2021
A classroom is set up for the fall semester at Middletown High School. There will be an empty desk between two students. High school students will have to carry their desk shield assigned to them when moving to another class.
Yehyun Kim / CTMirror.org

Research released Monday confirms what many parents and educators already suspected — more students than ever are falling behind during the pandemic, a problem especially present among those learning entirely from home in some of the state’s larger districts.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

As Gov. Ned Lamont rolls out his budget proposals for the coming biennium, education funding seems poised to become a battleground. Lamont wants to freeze the state’s contribution to public schools, the pot of money called Education Cost Sharing, or ECS. Instead, he would boost districts by using federal coronavirus funds. And that’s raising alarm among educators and advocates.

5317367 / Pixabay

Plumbers and electricians are essential workers with well-paying jobs.  And yet skilled trades face worker shortages and struggle to recruit young people.

This hour, we take a look at vocational education. We talk with a teacher and a student from one of Connecticut’s technical high schools.

And we ask a national expert: what can the Biden administration do to build up a new generation of tradespeople?

Desks are spaced 6 feet apart in a classroom at the CREC Academy of Science and Innovation in August, 2020.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

As COVID-19 cases rise, teachers, parents, and students worry--is school safe? At the same time, as many students engage in education remotely, many students are falling farther and farther behind, and the impact of that learning loss is disproportionately falling on nonwhite students.

By Amherst2005 (www.creativecommons.org)

Over 40 million Americans have student loan debt owing an average of $36,520 alone, for federal loans. Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona, and President Joe Biden's nominee to lead the Department of Education, says student debt relief would be a priority. 

The U.S. Department of Justice is dropping its controversial lawsuit brought by the Trump administration against Yale University, in which it accused the school of illegally discriminating against white and Asian American applicants in its undergraduate admissions process.

Pixabay

Broadband access is not just a convenience, it’s essential for life under COVID-19. 

This hour, we take a look at Connecticut’s digital divide. We talk with a researcher whose report highlights the stark racial and economic disparities in internet access in our state.

Governor Lamont has proposed universal broadband by September 2022. But is the state taking strong enough steps to put all residents on an equal footing when it comes to internet access?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

Dr. Miguel Cardona’s journey as an educator started in an elementary school classroom in Meriden, Connecticut. Now, Connecticut’s education commissioner is heading to Washington D.C. as President Biden’s pick for nation’s Secretary of Education.  This hour, we sit down down with Dr. Cardona.

If confirmed by the Senate, Cardona will take the helm of the U.S. Department of Education during a pandemic that has profoundly disrupted the country’s education system.  As Education Commissioner, Cardona advocated strongly for an in-person return to the classroom in Connecticut. How will he navigate education during COVID-19 at a national scale?

The percentage of Hartford students in racially integrated schools dropped significantly this academic year amid the challenge of the COVID pandemic and a major change in the operation of the regional school choice lottery, according to figures provided by the state Department of Education.

Seth Sawyers / Creative Commons

We’re one semester into the 2020-2021 academic year. This hour, how are faculty at our Connecticut colleges and universities holding up? 

Coming up, we'll talk about faculty burnout, the impending end of tenure, and what universities will invest in, in the future. 

Miguel Cardona with his parents in Meriden.
CTMirror.org

Miguel Cardona is drawing praise from many in the academic community as a visionary choice to be the next U.S. secretary of education. President-elect Joe Biden announced his pick last week.

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