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Taylin Santiago, a New London High School student who identifies as Afro-Latino, testified in front of the Education Committee during a public hearing about H.B. 7082.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Do you remember high school history? The subject has the reputation of being “boring”, thick with names and dates that can be a chore to remember. But this hour we ask: How do the history lessons we learn in school shape the way we see the world around us?

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Authorities in Boston announced charges Tuesday in an alleged large-scale college bribery scheme.

Prosecutors said dozens of people have been charged in what federal officials are calling the biggest college admissions scam ever prosecuted by the Justice Department. 

David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

Over 1,300 students, faculty members, and others have signed a petition asking for the state to stop its plan to consolidate the 12 public community colleges into one system. 

They’re calling themselves the Reluctant Warriors. 

School Regionalization Bills Sow Confusion, Spread Fear

Mar 11, 2019

Ever since Senate President Pro Tem Martin Looney’s controversial school regionalization bill referenced realigning districts “in a manner similar to the probate districts,” the brightly colored map delineating those court districts has been shared widely on social media by alarmed parents and educators.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A new education bill seeks to add African-American studies to the social studies curriculum in Connecticut public schools. High school students testifying before the legislature this week said loud and clear that Black history is more than just Rosa Parks, slavery and civil rights.

This playground is made of recycled materials, and about a third of it is from recyled oral care waste.
David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

Third-grader Emma Hallett helped her mom manage the recycling bins, which were set up along a wall at the back of a noisy cafeteria at Kelley Elementary School in Southington.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Ned Lamont discussed with national members of the American Federation of Teachers ways to target – and then retain – teachers.

David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

When he was young, Michael Gilberg knew how to make a point.

"My mother always said when I was 8, I would make a good attorney because I was good at arguing,"  he said.

Adam Hushin / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut has launched a new collaborative effort to support manufacturing industry in the state. The collaboration, called “TEAM Works,” -- Technology, Education, and Advanced Manufacturing -- joins together Connecticut’s public and private colleges, comprehensive and technical high schools, small and large manufacturers, and state agencies. 

How Are Lockdown Drills Affecting American Kids?

Feb 15, 2019
Adhiti Bandlamudi / North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

Lockdown drills have become increasingly common in schools across the United States. Though drills differ from school to school, they usually require students to crouch in a corner of their darkened classroom, away from the door, and stay quiet until the teacher says it is okay to start talking again. Students start practicing these drills as early as pre-school, before they can truly understand what threat they are hiding from.

Three women who attend Yale University have brought a lawsuit to try to open the school’s fraternities to women.

UConn Trustees Appoint UVA Provost Thomas C. Katsouleas As New President

Feb 5, 2019
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

With a unanimous vote Tuesday morning, the University of Connecticut Board of Trustees appointed Thomas C. Katsouleas as the university’s 16th president. Katsouleas, currently provost and executive vice president of the University of Virginia, said he was “honored and humbled” to be appointed. 

UVa's Tom Katsouleas Is Finalist For UConn President

Jan 30, 2019
Jackson Mitchell / WNPR

The finalist for the University of Connecticut presidency is Thomas C. Katsouleas, the provost and executive vice president of the University of Virginia, according to sources familiar with the six-month search for the school’s 16th president.

Nina Keck / Vermont Public Radio

Hampshire College, in Amherst, Massachusetts announced last week that they are looking for a “strategic partner,” that could help them survive while deciding whether or not to admit a class of students to start at the college in the fall of 2019.

Bill Smith / Creative Commons

Literacy. It's something many of us take for granted. The ability to read health forms, headlines, or the latest bestsellers. Yet, across the U.S., there are millions of adults who have difficulty reading.

This hour, we find out why. We talk with literacy experts and advocates, and we also hear from you.

Hampshire College says it wants a “strategic partner” to help it face a tough financial outlook. But the school's president stopped short of saying she wants to merge with another college.

Dave White / Creative Commons

For interview highlights from this show, click here. 

It’s been fifteen years since the death of Fred Rogers -- a man who, for decades, served as the cardigan-donning host and creator of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Rogers’ life is now the focus of a new Maxwell King biography -- aptly titled The Good Neighbor. This hour, we sit down with King for a special preview of the book. 

Pexels

The number of kids missing school days in Hartford Public Schools is higher than both the national average and the state average. As a result of this struggle to keep every student in the classroom, Hartford is reaching out for help to Attendance Works, a national organization dedicated to reducing chronic absenteeism.

A spike in blood pressure. A racing heart rate. Sweaty palms.

For many adults, this is what they feel when faced with difficult math.

But for kids, math anxiety isn't just a feeling, it can affect their ability to do well in school. This fear tends to creep up on students when performance matters the most, like during exams or while speaking in class.

One reason for a kid's math anxiety? How their parents feel about the subject.

Photo by Yutaka Tsutano, Courtesy of Flickr CC

School districts across the state have varying practices on when and whether school officials should seize and search a student's phone. Now, there's an effort underway to make a statewide policy.

Catherine Boyce

This hour, Save the Children U.S. President and CEO Carolyn Miles joins us. We talk about her decades-long career and learn about the unconventional journey that led her to the Fairfield-based NGO.

It’s the latest conversation in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series, featuring prominent women with ties to the state. 

Robert Couse-Baker / Creative Commons

Being a high school student isn't easy. There's pressure to get the grade, participate in extracurriculars, and sleep enough to function. It's rare young people can do all three. 

David DesRoches / WNPR

Schools throughout rural Connecticut have been shrinking or closing for years. Many districts have consolidated with neighboring towns to pool resources, in a process called regionalization.

And some schools – like Burnham School in Bridgewater – have taken a more creative approach.

The Harvard University admissions trial comes to a close on Friday. At the heart of this controversial federal lawsuit is the question of just how much a school can consider race in admissions.

The plaintiff, a group called Students for Fair Admissions, has accused Harvard of discriminating against Asian-American applicants. It argues the school considers race too much, forcing Asian-Americans to meet a higher bar to get in.

Dave White / Creative Commons

For interview highlights from this show, click here. 

It’s been fifteen years since the death of Fred Rogers -- a man who, for decades, served as the cardigan-donning host and creator of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Rogers’ life is now the focus of a new Maxwell King biography -- aptly titled The Good Neighbor. This hour, we sit down with King for a special preview of the book. 

WNPR/David DesRoches

A federal judge is expected to rule soon on whether a case against Hartford’s magnet school system can proceed to trial. A group of parents and activists are challenging the school system’s insistence that it maintain racial diversity - even if that means leaving seats empty. 

ccarlstead / Creative Commons

In the 1996 landmark Sheff v. O’Neill case, the Connecticut Supreme Court found that minority students in Hartford's public schools “suffered daily” due to racial and economic segregation.

Now, 22 years later -- Connecticut’s magnet school solution to Sheff’s desegregation mandate has been held up as a model for integration around the country. Yet many minority students in Hartford still attend struggling and highly segregated schools.

Update: Many student borrowers have responded to this story by sharing stories of their struggles with PSLF. We've curated many of them here.

On the morning of Monday, Aug. 27, Seth Frotman told his two young daughters that he would likely be home early that day and could take them to the playground. They cheered.

Governor Dannel Malloy

A music teacher at Warren Harding High School in Bridgeport has been named the Connecticut Teacher of the Year.

A federal lawsuit alleging Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American applicants goes to court this week in Boston.

While the case focuses on Harvard, it could have big consequences for higher education, especially if it moves on to the U.S. Supreme Court. At stake is 40 years of legal precedent allowing race to be one factor in deciding which students to admit.

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