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Arts and Culture

Horsemen of the Esophagus

Feb 20, 2011

Today on Paper Trails, the new public radio show about books, author Jason Fagone discusses his book Horsemen of the Esophagus: Competitive Eating and the Big Fat American Dream, about the very, very weird world of competitive eating.

J.D. Salinger

Feb 19, 2011
creative commons, Adie_92

Will Hochman, who teaches at Southern Connecticut State University, is one of these walking encyclopedias of all things J.D. Salinger.

Mr. Salinger, of course, wrote the iconic Catcher in the Rye, and other books, then stopped communicating with the outside world in 1965.  As with any famous recluse, absence creates a sensation of interest and for him the long cat and mouse game began.

Hot Seat!

Feb 19, 2011
creative commons codepo8

Today's guest is Jackie Farrelly.  She's the Property Manager at Long Wharf Theatre, where she's been responsible for set dressing and props for over one hundred productions during her tenure. Jackie, a Connecticut native, lives in North Haven.

Flickr Creative Commons, Chascow

Earlier this week, Bernie Madoff gave an interview to a reporter working on a book called "Wizard of Lies, Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust." Wow. Prison must be really boring if he's willing to give that writer his time.

Blue for Oceans

Feb 18, 2011
Wikimedia Commons

First among all poetic virtues, according to Ezra Pound, is the heart's tone. In the poems of this debut collection, the tone of the poet's heart sounds clearly.

Set within an American family in the second half of the twentieth century, the poems move from California to New England, from boyhood to ailing parents, from a long marriage to love's dissolutions, from childbirth to children leaving home.

Remembering Fredi Washington

Feb 18, 2011
The Connecticut Historical Society. 2001.22.16.

Fredericka Carolyn "Fredi" Washington was born in Savannah, Georgia in 1903 and died in Stamford, Connecticut in 1994.  Fredi began her career as a dancer at the Cotton Club in Harlem during the 1920s.  She appeared in Black and Tan, a short film featuring Duke Ellington and his orchestra, in 1929 and went on to career in motion pictures.  She is most famous for her portrayal of Peola in Imitation of Life (1934).  Peola, a light-skinned young African-American woman, chooses to pass as white in order to escape racial discrimination. 

Flickr Creative Commons, AndyRob

I got my first glimpse at backstage Broadway when I was in the first grade.

Wikimedia Commons

I started writing humor -- or trying, anyway, -- when my column launched in the Hartford Courant in 1982. 

Flickr Creative Commons, p_a_h

You are surrounded by Artificial Intelligence. It's in your smartphone, in your DVR, probably even in your refrigerator.  

Dog, Inc.

Feb 15, 2011
kitty.green66/flickr creative commons

What Stiff did for the dead and Fast Food Nation did for the burger, Dog, Inc. does for the stranger-than-fiction world of commercial dog cloning. 

creative commons, Iman Mosaad

Bob's simple saving rules.

1. Every month pay off the balance on your credit cards.

2. By age 30 save 15% of your income.

3. Pay yourself first (save before you spend)

4. When your portfolio is twice the size of your salary, become knowledgeable about investing and pay attention to your portfolio (gain in portfolio should be equal to or greater than what you are saving.)

Earth's Return to the Drone

Feb 14, 2011

This week on the Needle Drop, the band Earth revisits the world of atmospheric drones with the album Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light I. We've also got a review of the new Strokes single, and new tracks from James Blake and Anamanaguchi.

Flickr Creative Commons, Ashley R. Good

In the matter of kisses, I yield the floor to the Roman poet Catullus:

Willie Loves Jennie

Feb 14, 2011
Connecticut Historical Society

Corporal William L. “Willie” Norton, Company B, 10th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, missed his sweetheart. Jennie E. Annis was home in Buckland (Manchester), Connecticut.  Willie was fighting in the South with the Union Army. The Connecticut Historical Society recently acquired two letters written by Willie to Jennie. The first was written in March 1863 from Island St. Helena, South Carolina, and the second was written from Seabrook Island, South Carolina in July 1863.

atomicjeep/Flickr creative commons

Chris Prosperi's Beef Barley Soup

1/2 lb. barley2 quarts water1 lb. diced beef (I used stew meat. It was cut in 1-inch cubes and I quartered it.)1 tablespoon oil2 cups diced onions1 cup diced carrot1 cup diced celery1 teaspoon paprika2 cups red wine1 quart canned beef stock1 quart water1 lb. frozen peas1/4 cup corn starch1/4 cup cold water1 teaspoon black peppersalt to taste if needed1/4 cup chopped parsley For the barley:In a 6-quart sauce pan combine water and barley and cook at a simmer about 1 hour or until soft.

Heart of the City

Feb 13, 2011
Thomas R. Stegelmann/Flickr creative commons

The handsome Texas sailor who offers dinner to a runaway in Central Park. The Midwestern college girl who stops a cop in Times Square for restaurant advice. The Brooklyn man on a midnight subway who helps a weary tourist find her way to Chinatown. The Columbia University graduate student who encounters an unexpected object of beauty at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

kevindean/Flickr creative commons

"Eric Burns, a bona fide TV historian, has pulled off a difficult task—he has brought our early, grainy television history to life in living color. His book is a tour of our times, from cowboys and Indians, and scoundrels and healers, to televised hearings and game show hosts. Invasion of the Mind Snatchers is a television-lover's portrait of how we got here, for better or worse, and Burns reminds us that what we were watching all those years was our own history unfolding." — Brian Williams, Anchor and Managing Editor, NBC Nightly News

Jess Row, Author and Buddhist

Feb 12, 2011

Paper Trails is a new public-radio show about books, co-produced by WNPR and the New Haven Review. Paper Trails is not the usual feel-good suck-up to the author; on this show, co-hosts Mark Oppenheimer and Brian Francis Slattery give their honest opinions of the book . . . while the author listens in the studio. Then, in the second and third segments, the author gets to respond.

Flickr Creative Commons, Sir Mildred Pierce

As a former religion writer, I struggle with the whole idea of branding any particular religion as a "Cult."

Diane Orson

flickr creative commons/KirrilyRobert

Download Faith Middleton's Couscous Recipe Kit 2010 as a PDF file by clicking here.

Faith Middleton's Couscous Recipe Kit 2010 features eight recipes, including:

Just in time for Yankee Magazine’s 75th anniversary.  A brand-new collection of more than 150 easy and delicious recipes from New England’s finest cooks, just for your kitchen!

Go Mad With Dumbo Gets Mad

Feb 10, 2011

On the Needle Drop this week, we're serving up new tracks from Fleet Foxes and Vivian Girls; plus, a review of the new Cloud Nothings album.

We'll also be looking into new releases from Braids, John Vanderslice, and Dumbo Gets Mad.

Singularity 101

Feb 8, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, davedehetre

It could be all the coffee I drank this morning, but I think I have an observation that combines the concept of singularity -- the moment at which artificial intelligence or scientifically modified human intelligence becomes smarter than anything that has ever lived on earth -- with the Green Bay Packers Super Bowl victory.  

Finally a book that combines the fresh, exuberant flavors of great Italian food with the ease and comfort of a slow cooker. Michele Scicolone, a best-selling author and an authority on Italian cooking, shows how good ingredients and simple techniques can lift the usual “crockpot” fare into the dimension of fine food.

Flickr Creative Commons, phrenzee

Today we'll be analyzing the commercials from last night's Super Bowl. Why? Because, as one writer for Salon.com put it, "We all accept the Super Bowl as less of a game than a pop culture nexus point -- a place where the American self-image asserts itself with familiar rituals ... while cautiously acknowledging the present and looking to the future. The Super Bowl's expansive and awkward mix of performers, images, products and messages is a spectacle of its own."

The Great Hartford Fire Department

Feb 5, 2011

In 1783, many Connecticut residents gathered around the State House on Main Street in Hartford, CT to celebrate the end of the Revolutionary War with a huge bonfire. To everyone’s surprise, some of the burning embers set fire to the roof of the State House.  Although the building survived it was so badly damaged that a new one had to be built leading to the erection of the structure we know as the Old State House today.  

Flickr Creative Commons, Lancashire County Council

Movies are usually beautiful lies. If you want to learn about history, read a history book. The most a movie can do is kind of light you up, in a vague way, about its historical subject. You watch "Gandhi," maybe you get why Gandhi was such a big deal.

American Chinatown

Feb 4, 2011
creative commons, Mike Disharoon

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