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Renewable Energy

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

In Connecticut, The Costs And Benefits Of Shared Solar Are Tough To Calculate

Renewable energy projects have been growing across New England in recent years. And while offshore wind and grid-scale solar have gotten lots of the attention -- a smaller, more community-oriented way of getting power has been steadily taking hold: “shared clean energy.”

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Maja Dumat (Creative Commons) / Wikimedia

While green carnations are all the rage on St. Patrick’s Day, I would rather give a shamrock plant to a loved one. Oxalis, or the shamrock plant, can be an invasive weed in warm climates, a sour-tasting ground cover in cold climates or a cute houseplant. I want to focus on the houseplant versions.

Updated at 2:46 p.m. ET

California Sen. Kamala Harris says she was bent toward a career fighting for civil rights almost since birth.

The Democrat is the daughter of an Indian mother and a Jamaican father who met at the University of California, Berkeley, and were active in the movement during the 1960s.

"I was born realizing the flaws in the criminal justice system," she told NPR's Steve Inskeep.

Former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez leaving Hartford Superior Court on November 14, 2018, following arguments over his pension.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A state judge has revoked the public pension of former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez, a year and a half after Perez pleaded guilty to two corruption-related offenses stemming from his time in office.

One of the most prominent members of special counsel Robert Mueller's team investigating Russia's attack on the 2016 presidential election will soon leave the office and the Justice Department, two sources close to the matter tell NPR.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut emergency departments will get free supplies of naloxone, the opioid antidote, to start distributing the reversal drug to patients as they leave the hospital.

Updated at 5:48 p.m. ET

The Federal Aviation Administration says it is temporarily grounding all Boeing 737 Max aircraft operated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory.

The announcement Wednesday afternoon follows decisions by many other countries to ground the planes after 157 people died in Sunday's crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8.

Nathalie Taranto, 85, of Easton, said she's worried about how a proposed Connecticut asset test would affect her eligibility in the Medicare Savings Program.
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut is considering reinstating an asset test for Medicare Savings Programs. State officials say it will save money while program enrollees are worried about losing coverage and experiencing higher health care costs.

Honda has recalled more than 1 million Acura and Honda vehicles in the United States with air bag inflators that, if deployed during a crash, could explode and shoot pieces of sharp metal at the driver and passengers the safety feature is intended to protect.

Go to college, we tell students. It's a ticket out of poverty; a place to grow and expand; a gateway to a good job. Or perhaps a better job. But just going to college doesn't mean you'll finish. To unlock those benefits — you'll need a degree.

And yet for millions of Americans, that's not happening. On average, just 58 percent of students who started college in the fall of 2012 had earned any degree six years later, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

As countries worldwide continue to ground their Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, aviation officials in the U.S. have been hesitant to follow suit.

The Federal Aviation Administration says there is "no basis to order the grounding of the aircraft." That's according to a statement Tuesday evening from Daniel Elwell, the acting FAA administrator.

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More From Connecticut Public Radio

Can Feces Save A Species? Boston Has The World's Largest Collection Of Right Whale Poop

The Marine Stress and Ocean Health Lab at the New England Aquarium looks like your typical laboratory. It’s full of humming and whirring machines, beakers and test tubes, digital scales and centrifuges. What sets it apart is the freezer. At negative 80 degrees Celsius, it houses the world’s largest collection of right whale poop. Yes, poop. It sounds gross, but scientists can learn a lot from feces reproductive and metabolic health, stress levels, exposure to infectious disease and biotoxins...

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Legislature

Jeff Kubina (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Package Stores Offer Dime Recycling Fee In Lieu Of Liquor Bottle Deposits

Connecticut’s package stores have proposed a 10-cent “recycling fee” as a compromise alternative to the 25-cent deposit Gov. Ned Lamont recommended last month.

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Sharing America

Fixed Odds: Problem Gambling in America

'Fixed Odds' explores the impact of problem gambling on communities of color and the extent to which states provide money for problem gambling treatment.

The Beaker

UConn Students Experiment With Classroom Cannabis

Hundreds of students are taking a class to learn about the plant.

Connecticut Public Radio is working with other stations to focus on the role of guns in American life.

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