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Camila Vallejo / Connecticut Public

State Finds Bedbugs, 'Grossly Soiled' Conditions At Norwalk Care Facility

Carlson Place, a residential care facility in Norwalk, has been ordered to move all of its residents after a state investigation that found nearly two dozen public health code violations. Included on the list were inadequate food supplies, “grossly soiled” bathrooms and live bedbugs. The state attorney general said Thursday that a new buyer had been identified for the facility and that all residents will be moved out of the building to allow for a complete renovation.

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Hartford Public High School Graduation
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

After A Difficult Year, Some Hartford High Graduates Walk The Stage With A Little Extra Help

It’s the morning of graduation and Armani Sidik is fixing her bright blue cap over her hijab as she patiently waits for her family. At the entrance of their walk-up apartment in the North End of Hartford, the Sidik family is joyful and neighbors walk by offering congratulations. “We gave her all our love, all our guidance, she’s doing really well, that’s our baby,” said Charlette Sidik, Armani’s mother, beaming with pride. But her daughter says making it to graduation was not easy. “We [were]...

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Updated June 22, 2021 at 8:22 PM ET

Democrats' massive election overhaul bill aimed at protecting and expanding voting rights and reforming campaign finance laws has stalled in the Senate.

Tuesday evening's procedural vote to bring up the legislation, called the For the People Act, needed 60 votes to open floor debate but received 50. In the evenly divided chamber, all Senate Democrats backed it, but all Senate Republicans voted no.

Updated June 23, 2021 at 4:05 PM ET

An important election takes place Tuesday in New York City.

But beyond who wins the mayoral primaries there, what happens could have consequences for how millions of Americans vote in the future.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC


  Some 20 families lined up to receive diapers and other essentials on a recent afternoon in Hartford. Among them was Angela Perez. 

“I’ve been [coming] here because they’ve helped me with food and diapers. Now we found out they’re closing,” Perez said in Spanish. “It’s been a huge help to me and many other moms.” 

popo.uw23 / flickr creative commons

The United States Supreme Court has issued a decision that experts say is sure to bring significant change to the business of college sports. That, of course, has ramifications for Connecticut’s college athletic programs, including the University of Connecticut.

Updated June 21, 2021 at 9:04 PM ET

The White House on Monday opened the door to revisiting the filibuster — a hotly contested issue across political lines — setting the stage for a bitter congressional fight to do away with the controversial debate tactic.

They say money doesn't grow on trees, but over the last year it did.

Lumber prices skyrocketed to historic highs during the coronavirus pandemic, fueled by a demand for new homes and a surge in renovations and DIY hobbyist projects by those of us on lockdown.

Now those record wood prices are finally starting to crack, and more builders across the U.S. are able to reach for their toolboxes.

Robert Dietz, chief economist at the National Association of Home Builders, said some projects that have been in limbo because of the prohibitive cost of wood may begin to resume.

In Florida, wildlife managers and environmental groups are stunned by a record number of manatee deaths. More than 750 manatees have died since the beginning of the year, the most deaths ever recorded in a five month period. Most of the deaths are in Florida's Indian River Lagoon, where a large die-off of seagrass has left manatees without enough to eat.

When Governor Ned Lamont, as expected, signs a bill legalizing marijuana for recreational use in Connecticut, the retail tax rate would be at the high end for states in the Northeast.

This week, Pride gas stations and convenience stores started giving a free large cup of coffee — iced or hot — to those who have been vaccinated.

Updated June 21, 2021 at 5:45 PM ET

Faced with the prospect of reshaping college athletics, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a narrow but potentially transformative ruling Monday in a case that pitted college athletes against the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

At issue in the case were NCAA rules that limit educational benefits for college players as part of their scholarships.

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More From Connecticut Public

Sculptor, Bridgeport Native Leonardo Drew's 'Monstrosities' Gets An Exhibition At The Wadsworth

Abstract sculptor Leonardo Drew is returning to his Connecticut roots with a new exhibition at the Wadsworth Atheneum. Two Projects includes an outdoor installation on the front lawn of the Hartford museum and two works inside.

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Coronavirus In Connecticut

Tracking COVID Data: Vaccinations, Hospitalizations & Your Town's Infection Rate

Vaccinations continue across Connecticut with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting Thursday a total of 4,687,585 doses have been distributed to the state and 4,339,850 doses have been administered. So far, about 66.3 % of Connecticut’s population has received at least one vaccine dose and 59.3% are fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

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Colin covers topics that vary widely from day to day. Listen to hear a thoughtful, smart, interesting conversation with amazing guests. Every day at 1 pm and 9 pm.

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Seasoned

Explore our state’s seasonal ingredients and the passionate people who grow and cook our food.

Disrupted

Join Khalilah Brown-Dean as she explores the disruptions of 2020 to find something more inclusive, and more effective.

Transcend assumptions. Humanize the stereotyped. Understand the misunderstood.