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Canada's Wild Salmon Caravan Connects Future Of Fish And Indigenous People

At 10 a.m. on Sept. 22, Granville Street in Vancouver turned into a river. Brightly colored cardboard salmon, bicycle floats and hundreds of people dressed in costumes flowed down the street, carrying huge silkscreen banners and flags as big as sails printed with the words "Wild Salmon Forever." People sang, beat drums and called the wild salmon home. It was Day One of the weeklong Wild Salmon Caravan : the fourth annual 250-mile pilgrimage which follows the yearly migration of sockeye salmon...

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Interpol President Meng Hongwei has resigned, after being detained by Chinese authorities who accuse him of corruption. The shocking turnabout comes days after Meng's wife said the career police officer had disappeared; one week ago, he left France to visit his native China.

As clerical sex abuse scandals buffet the Catholic Church, a three-week assembly of bishops is under way in Rome on how to make the Church relevant for young people. But the assembly, known as a synod, will likely be dominated by what many analysts call Catholicism's worst crisis since the reformation.

Roughly 250 priests, bishops, cardinals and some younger laypersons are participating in the synod.

In the opening mass, pope Francis urged them "to dream and to hope."

Griebel: Tapping Pension Funds Risky - Doing Nothing Is Worse

Oct 7, 2018
Oz Griebel
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Oz Griebel concedes that his proposal to defer state pension contributions is a gamble.

He just doesn’t believe that this approach poses any more risk than continuing along the problematic path of tax hikes and program cuts that have vexed state finances over the past decade.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Jewish Federation of Greater Hartford hosted a gubernatorial forum Sunday that featured Republican Bob Stefanowski, Democrat Ned Lamont, and third party candidate Oz Griebel.

Five days after a prominent Saudi journalist went missing at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul, there are still more questions than answers.

Jamal Khashoggi, a veteran journalist who has been critical of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, hasn't been seen since Tuesday, when he went into the consulate to get documents for his upcoming marriage to a Turkish woman, and apparently never came out.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo wrapped up his fourth visit to North Korea on Sunday, describing his talks with leader Kim Jong Un as productive.

Pompeo met with Kim for about two hours, according to a pool report from CBS' Kylie Atwood, the only U.S. journalist who accompanied the secretary on his trip. The visit comes after President Trump's historic summit with Kim in June, which resulted in a vague commitment from Pyongyang to denuclearize.

Zairys Maysonet / Connecticut Public Radio

This weekend, just as Judge Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court amid allegations of sexual assault, some Yale students were adorning a sculpture on campus with flowers and letters of support for survivors. 

Updated at 11:31 p.m. ET

A sharply divided Senate — reflecting a deeply divided nation — voted almost entirely along party lines Saturday afternoon to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

A little more than two hours later, Kavauangh was sworn in during a private ceremony as protesters stood on the court's steps.

Updated 6:33 p.m. ET

White Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke has been found guilty of second-degree murder in the shooting death of black teenager Laquan McDonald.

It took the jury of eight women and four men about eight hours to reach a verdict.

When he gets a text message from Alex Cora, Joseamid Rodriguez is all goosebumps. He pulls out his phone to show a recent text exchange with the Red Sox manager, in which Rodriguez congratulates Cora for clinching a spot in the playoffs, then pulls up his arm to prove he gets goosebumps.

“He’s a person who always answers our texts, and it makes you feel so proud,” he says. “When a friend writes who now has such a high position as manager of the Red Sox — my hairs are standing right now!”

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Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Columbus Day? In West Hartford, Schools To Honor Indigenous Peoples' Day

Instead of honoring explorer Christopher Columbus, the second Monday of October will soon be called Indigenous Peoples’ Day on the school calendar in West Hartford.

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Sexual Assault

Coming To The Right Answer By Themselves: Talking With Boys About Sexual Assault

In the basement of a suburban Philadelphia home, half a dozen high school freshman boys recently met to munch on chips and pretzels — and to talk about sexual assault in the wake of the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings. A Jewish group called Moving Traditions brought them together as part of its programs to encourage teenagers to talk about this and other difficult issues. Temple Sinai in Dresher, Pa., sponsors this local group. Volunteer group leader Cody Greenes, 35, introduced the...

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Connecticut Public Radio's coverage of the 2018 elections.

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