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WNPR News sports coverage brings you a mix of local and statewide news from our reporters as well as national and global news from around the world from NPR.

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After Naomi Osaka won the first set against Serena Williams during Saturday's U.S. Open Women's Final, chair umpire Carlos Ramos gave Williams a warning for receiving help from her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, who was sitting in the stands. She asked Ramos to take it back. She told him she doesn't cheat. Ramos didn't take it back. After that, it got ugly.

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Here's the money quote from a recent Washington Post story on entertainment in the Trump era: "People look at politics when deciding how they feel about a host or actor. Pop culture has now become one more thing that divides us, just like cable news and social media." The Nose couldn't pass that up, and this not-quite-The-Nose show can't pass it up either.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Julissa Mota can recall the exact moment when squash — the preppy racquet sport — entered her consciousness.

Visitors had stopped by Julissa's fifth-grade class at M.D. Fox School, a neighborhood school in Hartford's South End. Capitol Squash, an urban squash program, was new and recruiting kids in 2014, so the executive director brought along a coach and a big blue box with racquets inside for the children to pass around.

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Nike is catching a lot of press for selecting former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick as the face of a new "Just Do It" ad campaign. 

Colin Kaepernick's allegation that the NFL colluded to deny him a contract as punishment for his lead role in player protests will get a formal hearing after an arbitrator denied the league's request for a summary judgment.

Kaepernick's lawyer, Mark Geragos, tweeted out a photo of the letter received from arbitrator Stephen Burbank on Thursday. ESPN reports that the league declined to comment.

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During halftime of tonight's football game between the University of Connecticut and the University of Central Florida, UConn’s marching band will pay special tribute to a student killed in the February shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Alex Schachter, 14, had plans to apply to UConn and play trombone in the marching band.

West Point - The U.S. Military Academy

The start of school and college -- along with the start of athletic training schedules -- have coincided with yet another heat wave in Connecticut. That’s led to warnings from experts on heatstroke. 

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Rocky Marciano is known around the world as the greatest heavyweight champion of all time. But what’s not as well known about the boxer is his strong connections to New England.

Rocky Marciano, born Rocco Marchegiano, grew up in Brockton, Massachusetts. His first professional fight was in Holyoke, MA. And most of his professional fights throughout his career were fought in Providence, Rhode Island. 

Lydia Brown / Connecticut Public Radio

Whole Foods in West Hartford might seem like a pretty unremarkable place, but in fact, it employs one of the world’s greatest athletes. Lhakpa Sherpa is a record-setting mountaineer—the only woman to have reached the summit of Mount Everest nine times. Born and raised in Nepal, Sherpa always dreamed of climbing the world’s tallest mountain. She settled in Connecticut with her now-ex-husband, but she makes regular trips home. Next year, she’s looking to reach the peak for the tenth time.

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The Nose is off this week, but we bring you some pop culture topics anyway:

Jon M. Chu's Crazy Rich Asians is the number-one movie in the country, and it's expected to hold onto the top spot on the charts through this weekend. It's on the cover of Time magazine, and it's seen as "a major step forward for representation -- and the industry."

And: Hits are down, and strikeouts are up. Pitching changes and replays are at an all-time high, and take-out slides and home-plate collisions have been banned. As such, baseball greats find the game "very difficult to watch." Is baseball in trouble? (Spoiler alert: Probably not.)

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