WNPR

New Haven Region

Our New Haven Region coverage includes stories about all the towns in the Greater New Haven area, ranging from Southbury, Wolcott and Meriden to Milford, Branford and Madison.

Christine Mai-Duc, Tribune Washington Bureau

New Haven native and journalist Clare Gillis spent 44 days in captivity in Libya before she was released in May. Gillis appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee Wednesday to share her story.

Gillis spoke out in favor of the bill in question --  the Consular Notification Compliance Act of 2011.

"If the U.S. continues to ignore its obligations under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, that makes it easier for foreign governments to ignore their obligations to imprisoned American citizens abroad," she said.

Bruce Barber

This week we gathered at one of my favorite local watering holes, Delaney’s Tap Room and Restaurant in the Westville section of New Haven. We chose Delaney’s to follow up on several conversations we had in Episode 4 at Heirloom: the importance of community, the uncertainty of our changing times, and the possibilities to be discovered in doing the things you love.

Diane Orson

More than 100 students were honored on Thursday as the first class of New Haven Promise.  That’s the new scholarship program that provides college tuition for city students. 

Wearing caps and gowns, New Haven public high school graduates filed into Sprague Hall on the Yale University campus.  Parents beamed.  City and state officials told the students that the Promise scholarship program was an expression of confidence in their promise for a brighter future.   

Bruce Barber

Someone (it might have been Episode 4 guest editor Binnie Klein) commented recently that the show has been “a show about making a show”, and I don’t disagree with that assessment. Having worked on the Guide in one form or another for over ten years now, I’m finally learning not to over think things. (Gary, our web designer is constantly urging me to “grip it and rip it” – a golfer’s exhortation to stop standing there and hit the damn ball.) That’s what’s happening with the RLSG radio show: we’re trying things and finding out what works and what doesn’t.

For the past two decades, the achievement gap between Hispanic students and their white classmates nationwide has remained largely unchanged. Hispanic students perform about two grade levels below their white peers in math and reading.

Connecticut has one of the largest gaps in the nation, and a new study finds the problem exists in every school district in the state.

White students in Connecticut are two to three times more likely than Hispanic students to achieve at or above goal on the Connecticut Mastery Tests. 

Diane Orson / WNPR

A special summer program has just wrapped up at a New Haven elementary school.  But  in this class the students are parents. 

It’s the final day of his year’s parent training program at Lincoln-Bassett School in New Haven.  Brenda Whitfield is telling the class of about 20 parents, what she’s learned. "I found out a lot of stuff about the math I can tell my granddaughter and my grandson. And I learned a lot about the science. I just learned so much while I was here at the training."

Big City Violence

Jul 14, 2011
Chion Wolf

The number of violent crimes in the US dropped significantly last year to the lowest rate in 40 years.

But then why haven’t Connecticut cities like Hartford and New Haven been able to join this trend?  

Morris Cove Neighbors Say "No Dumping Here"

Jul 12, 2011
Allan Appel, New Haven Independent

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has a plan to move silt and sediment from Bridgeport’s Harbor to the New Haven Harbor. But some city residents are doing their best to keep that from happening.


New Haven Mayor John DeStefano and Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro joined about fifty protestors who gathered recently on the shoreline in Morris Cove -- a neighborhood of New Haven that looks out onto New Haven Harbor and Long Island Sound.  In the water are kayakers, and a line of boats 40 deep, all with anti-dumping signs…

"Thank you boaters! Thank you for coming out!

"

A former Bridgeport Board of Education president says he and many city residents were surprised by the state’s quick takeover of the troubled school system.  

Max Medina Jr. says in 16 years serving on Bridgeport’s Board of Education he’s never seen anything quite as speedy as the recent decision by the state to intervene in the city’s schools.

Bruce Barber

We mourned the passing of a New Haven institution in episode 2, and we wish Dieter and the gang at Richter’s the best of luck.

We chose Richter’s because a.) I’ve been going there for years, and b.) at the end of Episode 1, while wandering Chapel Street, we decided to record at Richter’s – only to find out they were closing. Duo saw it’s demise as a metaphor for the shift from face to face conversation to the decidedly ethereal relationships we’ve cultivated on Facebook and Twitter.

It's All Up For Grabs

Jul 6, 2011
Uma Ramiah

Goodwill and the Salvation Army are reliable spots for inexpensive items. But one New Haven store is working with a new model: everything is just plain free.

Twenty four year old Hans Schoenburg is talking to a potential customer, and she has a pressing inquiry.

"Now I have one question. What do you do about making sure there's no bugs in the sweaters people give you?"

The Mayor of East Haven will allow a court-appointed hearing officer to determine whether the town’s police chief should keep his job.  

In April 2010, East Haven Mayor April Capone Almon placed Police Chief Leonard Gallo on paid administrative leave. That was just after the U.S. Department of Justice released early findings of its investigation into allegations of race-based violence, harassment and intimidation of Latinos by the town’s police. The DOJ cited the police department’s outdated policies on conduct and a lack of appropriate guidelines on the use of force.

Harriet Jones

Connecticut’s multi-million dollar investment in a new high-speed rail line from New Haven to Springfield is supposed to spur economic development. And for some communities it will mean big changes. WNPR’s Harriet Jones went to talk to small business owners in Meriden about their hopes for the city as the new line comes through.

It’s a sunny day in downtown Meriden and Ron Dagan and I are walking on a street parallel to the nearby train tracks.

Yo Yo Ma Draws Thousands

Jun 12, 2011
Uma Ramiah

The International Festival of Arts and Ideas opened in New Haven this weekend. And though the weather didn't cooperate, famed cellist Yo Yo Ma still greeted thousands for the free outdoor concert.

Despite heavy rainstorms, nearly 8,000 people turned out to see Yo Yo Ma and his Silk Road Ensemble perform. Under those grey skies the New Haven Green, in the center of town, was awash in a sea of brightly colored umbrellas.

For years, the original manuscript of the novel Gone With the Wind was believed to have been destroyed.  But as WNPR’s Diane Orson reports, the last four chapters recently re-appeared in a Southport, Connecticut library.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell tells the sweeping story of a headstrong Scarlett O’Hara and her turbulent love affair with Rhett Butler – set against the backdrop of the Civil War. The film starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh received ten Academy Awards. 

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