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Mental Health

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Police Set New Ways To Deal With Trauma After Newtown

Feb 25, 2013

The shooting deaths of 20 children and six adults in Newtown have forced law enforcement officials in Connecticut to come up with new procedures to help police. The measures could change the way law enforcement responds to life-changing trauma.

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Dr. Amy Arnsten, Professor of Neurobiology and Psychology at Yale University, spoke to WNPR's Ray Hardman, on her recently released findings from a study exposing the importance of healthy NMDA receptors needed for higher-level thinking and their potential link to illnesses like schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease when this pre-frontal cortical circuitry is damaged.

Cindy Papish Gerber

This time we’ll be talking about “Grief and Loss”, an issue we’ve been struggling with since the unthinkable violence in Newtown on December 14th. As you’ll hear in the podcast, grief and loss comes in many different forms - everything from the the sudden death of a spouse or a child to the loss of a job, a pet, a relationship... or sometimes even “all of the above”.

Why Worry?

Feb 13, 2013
Jonathan McNicol

Courtesy of Clifford Beers Clinic

A New Haven mental health clinic has received a federal grant to help the children of military families. The clinic aims to use the funding to fill a gap that exists in the VA health care system.

Lawmakers are hearing/heard testimony on mental health services in the state, as part of the legislature's response to the shootings at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown.  WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports. Patricia Rehmer had a note of caution for lawmakers.  She's the state's commissioner of Mental Health and Addition Services. "We do not have any information about the mental health or any mental health issues that the shooter in the Newtown tragedy may have.

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A study by University of Connecticut researchers has found that some children diagnosed with autism at a young age improved to a point where they no longer had symptoms of the disorder.

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After Newtown, school nurses and teachers have been asking for training to identify the early signs of trauma in children. The Child Health and Development Institute held two training sessions last week for school personnel in Connecticut with several more planned in the following weeks. 

Joining us this morning is Dr. Robert Franks, a trauma expert and Vice-President of The Child Health and Development Institute.

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Last month, on December 13, Governor Malloy appeared on our show for his monthly visit. We talked about the budget and the upcoming legislative session, and the issues he hoped to work on in the coming year.  

The next morning, everything changed.

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In the wake of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, lawmakers and advocates are taking a second look at the state's outpatient commitment laws. 

Connecticut is only one of six states that does not allow court ordered treatment for people suffering with mental illness that could be a danger to themselves or others.

Joining us by phone is Dr. Harold Schwartz, Psychiatrist-In-Chief at the Institute of Living and Vice-President of Behavioral Health, Hartford Hospital.

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The investigation into last month's shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School may take months to complete. The governor says the shooter's motive may never be known.

Chion Wolf

I'm not a big fan of getting ready to fight the previous war. Our next crisis will not be Adam Lanza. It will not be an exact replica of the facts of his life, not that we know those for sure yet. (I would say, parenthetically, that the worldwide rush to diagnose Lanza makes me massively uncomfortable.)

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