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Higher education

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A student at Central Connecticut State University is being treated for bacterial meningitis after becoming seriously ill. According to the university, the student is recovering and people who were in close contact with the student were given a course of antibiotics as a precautionary measure.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

United Technologies, headquartered in Farmington, Connecticut, has announced it will break into three companies by 2020. What will this mean for jobs and business in the state? This hour, we take a closer look.

Later, we hear how a mobile trailer is taking manufacturing skills training to parking lots across Connecticut.

And finally, we learn how a StoryCorps initiative brought two Trinity College students to the table to discuss their political differences.

Department of Commerce Photographic Services / Creative Commons

The late George Herbert Walker Bush had many ties to Connecticut. He grew up in Greenwich, and later went to Yale, where he graduated in 1948.

"I'm going to look like a laser beam in terms of how this impacts economic growth and what it'll mean for a budget,"  Lamont said. He takes over as governor on January 9, 2019.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Ned Lamont wants to focus on job creation and economic development as he prepares to assume Connecticut’s governorship.

Robert Couse-Baker / Creative Commons

Being a high school student isn't easy. There's pressure to get the grade, pile on the extracurriculars, and sleep enough to function. It's rare young people can do all three.

This hour, we talk with child psychologists and counselors about adolescent stress and anxiety.

Are you a high school student with too much on your plate? Do you feel pressure from your parents, teachers, or peers to take on more and more just to get into the “right college"?

If you are a parent or educator, do you believe students are taking on too much? What do you think can be done to create a healthier school-life balance? 

The Harvard University admissions trial comes to a close on Friday. At the heart of this controversial federal lawsuit is the question of just how much a school can consider race in admissions.

The plaintiff, a group called Students for Fair Admissions, has accused Harvard of discriminating against Asian-American applicants. It argues the school considers race too much, forcing Asian-Americans to meet a higher bar to get in.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A seat on the 4:32 p.m. train out of Hartford’s union station is emerging as the most coveted seat on the CTrail’s new Hartford Line that was launched in June.

Update: Many student borrowers have responded to this story by sharing stories of their struggles with PSLF. We've curated many of them here.

On the morning of Monday, Aug. 27, Seth Frotman told his two young daughters that he would likely be home early that day and could take them to the playground. They cheered.

Doug Kerr / Creative Commons

The University of Connecticut has announced that a football player suffered a stroke on October 10.

Linebacker Eli Thomas, a junior, was scheduled to lift weights on that Wednesday, but had to be immediately transported to a hospital after he had the stroke.

A federal lawsuit alleging Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American applicants goes to court this week in Boston.

While the case focuses on Harvard, it could have big consequences for higher education, especially if it moves on to the U.S. Supreme Court. At stake is 40 years of legal precedent allowing race to be one factor in deciding which students to admit.

From the middle of UMass toward the center of town in Amherst, Massachusetts, you may have seen some unexpected objects near walkways or up on a grassy hill.

Upon closer inspection, they’re delightful and puzzling pieces of art.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Former University of Connecticut men’s basketball coach Kevin Ollie has been charged by the NCAA with multiple violations including unethical conduct. Those findings could validate UConn’s March dismissal of Ollie.

Democratic candidate for governor Jay Gonzalez announced a proposal on Wednesday to tax private colleges in Massachusetts to pay for his transportation and education plans.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The University of Saint Joseph has tapped former UConn coach Jim Calhoun to lead its NCAA Division III men’s basketball team for its upcoming inaugural season.

Graduate Max Johnson, New Haven Mayor Toni Harp, Governor Dannel Malloy.
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A San Francisco-based software engineering school is opening a new location in Connecticut. 

Gustavo Takashima / Creative Commons

Former Trump official Steve Bannon was disinvited from the 19th annual "New Yorker Festival" Monday, after David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker, first invited him for a "serious" and "combative" conversation in which Remnick promised to pose "difficult" questions to Bannon. 

Updated at 1:12 p.m. ET

The federal official in charge of protecting student borrowers from predatory lending practices has stepped down.

In a scathing resignation letter, Seth Frotman, who until now was the student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, says current leadership "has turned its back on young people and their financial futures." The letter was addressed to Mick Mulvaney, the bureau's acting director.

Jenn Vargas / Flickr

Today, we take a look at a series of disturbing cases of alleged medical malpractice of inmates incarcerated in Connecticut.

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To mark the one-year anniversary of the Charlottesville, Virginia rally, the Anti-Defamation League is looking to spread awareness surrounding acts of hate, with a new tool they’re calling a H.E.A.T. (Hate, Extremism, Anti-Semitism, and Terrorism) map.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut experienced an increase in new voter registration after the 2016 presidential election.

The secretary of the state’s office is reporting that 275,114 new voters registered between the between November 2016 and July 2018, an increase over data collected 20 months out from the 2014 mid-term election.

David Wall / Creative Commons

Connecticut's education policymakers have a lot of work to do, if they want to improve access to higher education and ensure poor students are upwardly mobile, according to a recent state-by-state analysis by the University of Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Education.

The Board of Regents for the Connecticut State College and University system has unanimously approved a new plan to consolidate the state’s community colleges. This comes after an accrediting body rejected a previous proposal to merge the 12 community colleges into one “Community College of Connecticut”.  

The newly approved plan would eventually create a single accredited institution in 2023, after a transitional period of partial consolidation. This hour, Mark Ojakian, President of the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities System joins us in studio to explain the new plan and take your questions.

Maloney Hall at Central Connecticut State University, where the school's theater department is located.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Newly released documents reveal that Central Connecticut State University knew about allegations of sexual harassment against one of its professors as far back as 2005. But until recently, CCSU denied that it had records of complaints against Joshua Perlstein.

Bruce Williams / Wesleyan University

Anita Hill, the law professor who became an advocate for victims of sexual harassment in the workplace when she spoke out against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas during his confirmation hearings in 1991, provided the keynote address at Wesleyan University’s Commencement in Middletown Sunday.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Commencement was two days away and Karina Lasalle Arroyo had hauled out nearly seven months’ worth of luggage from her time in Connecticut.

She stood in a dormitory parking lot and confirmed she was ready to go home.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

UConn President Susan Herbst has announced she will step down after the 2018-19 academic year. Herbst, who has led the state's flagship university since 2011, did not give a reason for her decision in a message to the university community, only saying she felt it was the "right time for a change." 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Which Republican candidates are heading to primaries or the general election? We talk with Christine Stuart, editor of CTNewsJunkie.com about the state GOP convention. And she tells us what state lawmakers did—and didn’t—accomplish during this legislative session.

Eastern Connecticut State University

Professors in the state university system say their voices aren't being heard, and they want more input as the college system deals with a growing budget deficit.

Late spring is graduation season for schools across the United States. It's a time of joy and hope for many, but for DACA recipients and their families it can bring added anxiety. For many of these "DREAMers," the threat of deportation looms over their graduation celebrations.

NPR's Scott Simon spoke with Jessica Moreno-Caycho, a DREAMer graduating this May from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Moreno-Caycho said she came with her family to the United States from Peru in 2003. She was 8 years old when she arrived.

University of New Haven

Five engineering students from the University of New Haven unveiled their senior project -- a gun lock that works with a smartphone.

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