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Thirty additional Connecticut state employees who work in executive branch agencies have received layoff notices since May 3.

As the population of people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder keeps growing, so does the number of people with that diagnosis who aren't finding employment.

Though many young adults on the spectrum are considered high functioning, recent research shows 40 percent don't find work — a higher jobless rate than people with other developmental disabilities experience.

Millions more American workers will soon be eligible for overtime pay under a rule being finalized Wednesday by the Labor Department.

The rule says anyone who makes less than $47,476 per year must receive time-and-a-half pay for hours worked beyond 40 hours a week. That's roughly double the current threshold of $23,660.

The measure is one of the most sweeping moves the Obama administration has made so far in its efforts to boost slow-growing incomes. But it's sure to face opposition from some business owners.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

WNPR is launching a new series on the heroin epidemic gripping the state. This hour, we hear from one of the reporters leading the investigation.

Also, the state's ongoing budget problems are causing problems for a lot more people than just number crunchers and policy wonks. We check in with two former state employees who lost their jobs in a recent round of layoffs.

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When Barbara Bradley Hagerty set out to write her new book Life Reimagined, her goal was simple: learn how to avoid a midlife crisis. 

Mic445 / Creative Commons

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is an award-winning journalist and former NPR correspondent. She's also the author of Life Reimagined, a new book aimed at helping readers navigate the trials and opportunities of midlife.

Tom Page / Creative Commons

Unions representing more than 36,000 Verizon landline phone and cable workers are threatening a strike starting Wednesday morning if the company doesn't agree to a new contract.

State lawmakers were down to the wire on meeting the state budget deadline, and voting was expected to go on beyond the midnight deadline, once all of the budget bills are finalized.

Mic445 / Creative Commons

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is an award-winning journalist and former NPR correspondent. She's also the author of Life Reimagined, a new book aimed at helping readers navigate the trials and opportunities of midlife.

vivianejl / Creative Commons

Should the state of Connecticut become just the fourth in the nation to mandate paid family and medical leave for private employees? The question looks set to generate plenty of debate in Hartford this session, but the battle lines are more complicated than you might imagine. 

Vermont has become the fifth state in the nation to enact legislation that requires businesses to provide their workers with paid sick leave.

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To the list of things you can't avoid -- death and taxes -- we now add losing your job to a machine. A worry typically reserved for those in manufacturing, automation in the workplace is now a reality of nearly all occupations, and it's only getting worse... or is it?

Ken Nickerson could have retired from his job as a professor of biological sciences at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln 10 years ago, when he turned 62.

He could have retired five years ago, when the university offered faculty a year's salary to step down as part of a buyout to encourage more of them to leave.

He could have retired last year, when, in yet another buyout offer, administrators dangled the equivalent of 90 percent of one full year's salary in front of faculty who would finally agree to go.

But Nickerson stayed.

GotCredit/flickr creative commons

Gone are the days of graduating from college, paying your dues with a few entry-level positions, and landing a 30-year career with a big corporation, complete with retirement benefits.

Embracing Risk in Our Working Lives

Aug 13, 2015
Quinn Dombrowski/flickr creative commons

Gone are the days of graduating from college, paying your dues with a few entry-level positions, and landing a 30-year career with a big corporation, complete with retirement benefits.

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