WNPR

Washington D.C.

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Many of us hoped the white nationalist movement that instigated last year's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, would suffer a fatal blow. The majority of Americans condemned both the blatant bigotry displayed by the protesters and the president's failure to single out the nationalists as the perpetrators of the "hatred, bigotry and violence." He instead, said he saw that violence "on many sides."

That's not what happened.

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A recent study found that Connecticut ranked third nationwide in overall income inequality.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff / Creative Commons

U.S. President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday halting the at-the-border separation of immigrant children and families. Coming up, we wade through the details of the decision and consider its significance moving forward. 

Later, we talk about chronic pain and its impact on young children. We hear from a Connecticut mother whose son was diagnosed with amplified musculoskeletal pain syndrome (AMPS) and learn about the out-of-state program that treated him.

The White House

A confirmation hearing scheduled Wednesday for President Trump’s Veterans’ Affairs Secretary nomination has been postponed.

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Grading on the post-2016 scale, it was a relatively earth shattering revelation-free weekend. And so we have some time to regroup and take a look at more iterative developments in Mueller investigation- and Parkland-adjacent news.

Students from Ridgefield High School, Lane Murdock (right), Paul Kim (center), and Max Cumming (left), visited Hartford on February 23 to discuss '#nationalwalkout' in response to gun violence.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Students from Ridgefield High School are taking aim at gun violence. Members of Connecticut’s congressional delegation invited them up to Hartford Friday to talk about their plan for a walkout for students nationwide.

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

Congressional Republicans released a final draft of their tax bill Friday. With newfound support from two wavering senators, lawmakers appear to be on track to pass the measure and deliver it to President Trump for his signature by Christmas.

Votes in the House and Senate are expected next week.

AK Rockefeller / flickr creative commons

Mistrust of the government's version of the facts... Paranoid conspiracy theories... Allegations of treason... Distrust of American institutions... Controversial governmental investigations...

You might say that America's modern era started 54 years ago today in Dallas.

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We’ve been searching for months to find the right words to describe what’s it’s been like watching state lawmakers and the governor try to come together on a budget deal for the state. Senator Martin Looney, Democrat from New Haven has likened it to the process of having a prolonged tooth abscess that's finally being extracted. "A combination of exhaustion, pain, and relief," he said. 

Washington, D.C., is no stranger to First Amendment demonstrations. But local police will have a heightened challenge this weekend as a trio of rallies will place groups with clashing political views in close proximity on the National Mall.

Lori Mack / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal held an emergency hearing in New Haven Monday. The purpose was to gather testimony on the impact of President Trump’s immigration policies.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Calling it a "sad and outrageous day," Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal has called on Congress to quickly replace the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program.

Lawmakers have less than two weeks of legislative days to head off a government shutdown, raise the nation's borrowing limit and provide financial assistance in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Congress is back after a monthlong break, although it may not have seemed like Washington was on vacation based on the pace of political news in August.

The National Guard / Creative Commons

While Harvey ravages the Gulf Coast, some in Connecticut are stepping up to provide relief. This hour, we hear about their efforts and find out how you, too, can support the storm’s victims

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we revisit our show on the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

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