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transportation

Cyclists on a street in Amsterdam
Atauri / Flickr

Should streets be designed for cars? Some urban planners think we should be making our streets less efficient for automobiles, not more. This hour, can reimagining our streets create better communities?

wuestenigel / Creative Commons

Since 2015, nearly 70 people have died in hit-and-run crashes in Connecticut and hundreds have been injured.

Evan Kalish / Postlandia

When Alexis de Tocqueville toured America in the early 1830's to gather observations that he would later put on the pages of Democracy in America, he was impressed with the efficiency of our American Postal Service.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The Walk Bridge is a century-old “swing bridge” in Norwalk that carries hundreds of trains each day along Connecticut’s southern coast.

Office of Governor Dan Malloy / Screenshot via YouTube

While police have identified the six people killed when a new pedestrian bridge in Miami collapsed last week, officials are still investigating what caused the tragedy.

Wikimedia Commons

Following the death of a man on the Merritt Parkway this month, officials say more tree trimming alongside state highways is needed.

Connecticut Department of Transportation Commissioner James Redeker
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Two months after the state Department of Transportation halted more than 400 road projects in Connecticut because of budget issues, there’s still no resolution in sight.

Connecticut Department of Transportation Commissioner James Redeker
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut's transportation system is facing some problems. Weathered infrastructure, scant funds, an inert legislature -- can these hurdles ever be cleared?

This hour, James Redeker, Commissioner of the Department of Transportation, joins us. We take an in-depth look at the state's ongoing transit issues and talk about solutions.

Jason D. Neely

This hour: the origin of the Connecticut Valley Railroad. Author and historian Max R. Miller takes “along the valley line” -- sharing stories from the railroad’s past.

But first: on the heels of last month’s devastating Amtrak derailment in Washington state -- a look at what lies ahead for the nation’s aging transportation infrastructure

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Malloy administration is halting work on hundreds of transportation infrastructure projects, because the state’s Special Transportation Fund has run out of money. 

Adam E. Moreira / Creative Commons

Parts of the rail lines across the Northeast still don’t have Positive Train Control, also known as PTC. Officials said that the system could have prevented an Amtrak train derailment in Washington state that killed at least three people Monday.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

The National Transportation Safety Board says an Amtrak passenger train that derailed from an overpass south of Tacoma, Wash., leaving three people dead, was traveling at 80 mph in a 30 mph zone.

Updated at 12:30 a.m. ET Tuesday

Officials say three people are confirmed dead in the derailment of an Amtrak passenger train that plummeted off an overpass in Washington state. Part of the train was left dangling over a busy freeway between Olympia and DuPont at the height of the morning commute Monday.

Evan Kalish / Postlandia

When Alexis de Tocqueville toured America in the early 1830's to gather observations that he would later put on the pages of Democracy in America, he was impressed with the efficiency of our American Postal Service.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

WNPR’s Jeff Cohen and Ryan Caron King are back on the ground in Puerto Rico.

This hour: an update from The Island Next Door. We get the latest on local recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. 

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