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Marco Arment (Flickr Creative Commons)

The University of Connecticut has come out with a new study on violent video games. It looked specifically at whether video games that pit players against human looking characters provokes more violent thoughts in the player than fighting non-human creatures.

When players fight human looking characters, "they're later more verbally aggressive and they have more aggressive thoughts," said Kirstie Farrar, who is an associate professor of communication and lead researcher of the study.

Drunk Tank Pink

May 16, 2013
peapodsquadmom/flickr creative commons

Today: The way the thoughts we have and the decisions we make are influenced by forces that aren't always in our control.

Chion Wolf

Suicide rates have risen dramatically for middle-aged Americans in the last 10 years. The highest jump is for men aged 50-54. In a report released last week, the CDC says that more people aged 35-64 die from suicide than from car accidents, and they have been since 2009.

This hour, we look at what might be behind this trend, and what resources are available for Connecticut residents struggling with mental health issues.

New research finds that abnormalities in an infant’s placenta at birth may signal that the baby is at risk for developing autism. This could help families intervene earlier to improve outcomes for autistic kids.

By the time a child is diagnosed with autism, they’re usually at least three or four years old.

But a new study finds that by examining a newborn’s placenta under a microscope, you can predict whether the child is at risk for developing the disorder.

Photo courtesy of Flickr CC by Adkp

Waterbury police are collaborating with mental health professionals in a pilot program that aims to reduce traumatic stress in children.  The program is meant to provide support to children after the arrest of a parent or caregiver.

Asians and the "Model Minority" Myth

Apr 22, 2013

Asian Americans have been dealing with the "model minority" myth for decades. And it's playing a role in high suicide rates. The idea of Asians as a model minority dates back to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Scholars began publishing articles that argued against themes of social reform.

Tambako the Jaguar, Creative Commons

We all know the story. Monkeys in a science lab, top secret research, something goes terribly wrong. It’s no surprise that most cinematic attempts to depict research like this ends up focusing on what happens to the humans.

But what about the ethics of this research, and what it means for the test subjects? In many cases, chimpanzees have been seen as viable in research because of their close relationship to humans.

Salt Could Be Behind Rise In Autoimmune Diseases

Mar 7, 2013

Dr. David Hafler is chairman of Yale's Department of Neurology. He's been studying multiple sclerosis for several decades. His lab looks at T-cells known as "helper cells," which are meant to assist the immune system, but do the opposite in diseases like Type 1 diabetes. He says the cells went wild when they removed them from blood and added salt: "The surprise of the study was the degree to which salt could induce as much inflammation both in the mouse and in vitro."

Jonathan McNicol photo

How to Find Out Anything: Our guest, Don MacLeod, explains how to find what you're looking for quickly, efficiently, and accurately—and how to avoid the most common mistakes of the Google Age. From top CEO’s salaries to police records, you’ll learn little-known tricks for discovering the exact information you’re looking for. Whether researching for a term paper or digging up dirt on an ex, MacLeod’s advice arms you with the sleuthing skills to tackle any mystery.

Diane Orson

Wednesday marks the grand opening of the Yale University Art Gallery, following its 14-year renovation.  

Yale University Art Gallery Director Jock Reynolds is our guide. Time is short and with more than 200,000 objects in the museum’s collection we’re warned that its going to be a whirlwind tour. 

"You see here a great display of things from Mayan and Aztec cultures."

There’s a figure carved from manatee bone, colorful textiles and ceramics from Mexico and Costa Rica. I could spend all afternoon here, but gotta move on.

A group of Yale University engineers say they have made a major breakthrough in the mass production of micro fuel cells.

Micro fuel cells work much like their bigger counterparts that power buildings and buses. André Taylor is an assistant professor of chemical and environmental engineering at Yale, and lead investigator of the research.

A fuel cell takes a fuel source, it could be an alcohol, it could be a hydrogen gas, it could be methane and it converts that fuel using an electric chemical process into electricity.

Jonathan McNicol photo

How to Find Out Anything: Our guest, Don MacLeod, explains how to find what you're looking for quickly, efficiently, and accurately—and how to avoid the most common mistakes of the Google Age. From top CEO’s salaries to police records, you’ll learn little-known tricks for discovering the exact information you’re looking for. Whether researching for a term paper or digging up dirt on an ex, MacLeod’s advice arms you with the sleuthing skills to tackle any mystery.

When Lonesome George -  the famous giant Galapagos tortoise - died earlier this year, it was believed that he was the  last of his species.  But Yale University researchers say other tortoises of the same species may still be alive.

During his long life on the Galapagos Island of Pinta, Lonesome George was an icon of the conservation movement.  He was described by the Guinness Book of Word Records as "the rarest living creature".  

Lonesome George died last summer. 

Connecticut's "Transportation Gap"

Jul 16, 2012
Chiyeuk (Wikimedia Commons)

New research from the Brookings Institution's Metropolitan Policy program finds a stark disparity in public transit options between Connecticut’s bigger cities and their surrounding areas.

Brookings researcher Adie Tomer spent two years running transportation models in 100 metro regions across America. He says having data on commuting times is crucial in figuring out how to jumpstart struggling economies.

“Public transportation is a critical cog in actually making sure our metropolitan economies function to the peak of their abilities," Tomer says.

An Archeologist and a team of college students are spending the summer uncovering a little known chapter in Connecticut history.

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