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Long before the 19th Amendment recognized them as voters, a small group of women gathered at Howard University to create the first service Sorority founded by and for African American women. Alpha Kappa Alpha is part of a rich tradition of historically Black fraternities and sororities known as the Divine Nine.

Mamata.mulay / Creative Commons

We’re inching closer to the end of the fiscal year and Connecticut lawmakers at the state capitol still haven’t been able to reach a budget agreement. Meanwhile at the nation’s capitol, Senate Republicans are postponing a vote on their controversial health care bill.

This hour: a tale of gridlock in Hartford and Washington. 

Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas/CT Mirror

Martha Stone is a lawyer for the plaintiffs in the Sheff v. O'Neill case, which settled over 20 years ago. She said the state's current position threatens to harm Hartford students. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The long-running Sheff vs. O’Neill school desegregation case heads back to court this week. 

Public Domain

Known as “Blind Tom,” Thomas Wiggins was a slave from Columbus, Georgia. He was born with a condition that today might be diagnosed as autism. Blind Tom was also a musical prodigy, as a pianist and composer, and was referred to as the greatest pianist of his age.

WCN 24/7 / Creative Commons

Connecticut's anti-racial profiling law requires police officers to record the details of every traffic stop they initiate -- things like the time of day the stop occurred, the reason for the stop, and the race of the stopped driver. 

At the same baseball game that saw Boston Red Sox fans make amends with a player targeted by racial slurs at Fenway Park, one fan reportedly used a slur to comment on a singer — and that fan has now been banned from the stadium.

"Yes, it was a racial comment," Red Sox club President Sam Kennedy said, according to the team. "It was a racial comment used to describe the national anthem that was taking place, the performance of the national anthem. It was sickening to hear."

Demos

This hour, we tackle issues involving race, policy, and U.S. democracy with Demos President Heather McGhee.

Plus: a look at efforts to establish paid leave in Connecticut. If passed, how might new legislation impact the state's women of color? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Yale University

Yale University is making the transition from Calhoun College to Grace Murray Hopper College. Although the name change won't be official until July 1, changes are underway at the residential college, including a plan to replace a number of stained glass windows to better reflect the legacy of Grace Hopper.

Steve Lyon / Creative Commons

An audit by the Connecticut Racial Profiling Prohibition Project showed that the Hartford Police Department neglected to report thousands of traffic stops last year as was required by law.

This hour: segregation in the aftermath of Sheff v. O'Neill.

It's been more than 20 years since the landmark state Supreme Court ruling. We find out what two reporters uncovered about its impact on Hartford schools.

Sumit Chachra / Creative Commons

Recent hate crimes against Indians living in the U.S. have — again — sparked debate within South Asian communities, recalling memories of similar attacks after 9/11.

This hour, we hear reaction from Indians living in Connecticut. What’s the best way to respond to incidents of hate?

Connecticut Democrats Propose Hate Crime Legislation

Mar 16, 2017
TiAnna Taylor / WNPR

After recent high-profile incidents in Connecticut, Democratic lawmakers and local advocates hope to strengthen Connecticut’s hate crime laws. 

Victor Björkund/ Creative Commons

It's been 20 years since Connecticut's landmark Sheff v. O'Neill ruling, which said that segregation in Hartford schools was unconstitutional. This hour, we dive into an investigation by The Hartford Courant about how some neighborhood schools are still struggling, and how Sheff didn't solve the challenge of school integration. 

Fighting For The Vote

Mar 8, 2017
FBI/wikimedia

Fifty-two years ago this week, 600 peaceful protesters gathered in Selma, Alabama for what would become known as The Bloody Sunday March. Their goal was to draw attention to the importance of protecting the vote, not just for African Americans, but all Americans. 

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