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Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Advanced Placement test scores continue to rise in Connecticut, as does the number of students taking them.

James Boyes / Creative Commons

After Naomi Osaka won the first set against Serena Williams during Saturday's U.S. Open Women's Final, chair umpire Carlos Ramos gave Williams a warning for receiving help from her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, who was sitting in the stands. She asked Ramos to take it back. She told him she doesn't cheat. Ramos didn't take it back. After that, it got ugly.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

A white Hartford police sergeant who was caught on a citizen’s video saying he was “trigger happy” has been demoted and is fighting for his job, city officials said Thursday. 

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Julissa Mota can recall the exact moment when squash — the preppy racquet sport — entered her consciousness.

Visitors had stopped by Julissa's fifth-grade class at M.D. Fox School, a neighborhood school in Hartford's South End. Capitol Squash, an urban squash program, was new and recruiting kids in 2014, so the executive director brought along a coach and a big blue box with racquets inside for the children to pass around.

Portrait of Tim Parrish
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

From Charleston to Charlottesville, white supremacy still has roots in some communities. What draws some Americans to embrace extreme, hateful racist ideologies?

We talk with Tim Parrish, a Connecticut resident with firsthand perspective. Now a college professor, Tim joined an extremely violent and racist crowd as a high school student in Louisiana.

Colin Kaepernick's allegation that the NFL colluded to deny him a contract as punishment for his lead role in player protests will get a formal hearing after an arbitrator denied the league's request for a summary judgment.

Kaepernick's lawyer, Mark Geragos, tweeted out a photo of the letter received from arbitrator Stephen Burbank on Thursday. ESPN reports that the league declined to comment.

Matthew Straubmuller / Creative Commons

 

Many of us hoped the white nationalist movement that instigated last year's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, would suffer a fatal blow. The majority of Americans condemned both the blatant bigotry displayed by the protesters and the president's failure to single out the nationalists as the perpetrators of the "hatred, bigotry and violence." He instead, said he saw that violence "on many sides."

That's not what happened.

Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

Students from Parkland, Florida travelled to Newtown Connecticut—the site of the Sandy Hook massacre—to rally against gun violence this weekend.  But the problem of gun violence is not just confined to mass shootings.

Anthony Crider / Creative Commons

To mark the one-year anniversary of the Charlottesville, Virginia rally, the Anti-Defamation League is looking to spread awareness surrounding acts of hate, with a new tool they’re calling a H.E.A.T. (Hate, Extremism, Anti-Semitism, and Terrorism) map.

The Chronicle Magazine / Creative Commons

As legalization of marijuana continues to be debated on the campaign trail, Hartford City Council held a forum this week that focused on the effects that legalization can have on marginalized communities.

Despite Progress, HIV Racial Divide Persists

Jul 23, 2018
Arthur Harris Jr.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

By the time Arthur Harris Jr. turned 17, he had already endured a childhood of grinding poverty in Hartford’s North End, the death of his mother, and the rejection of a community that viewed homosexuality as a sin. It should have come as no surprise to anyone, then, that he went searching for love and acceptance wherever he could find it — a search that landed him in the arms of a man nearly twice his age and, later, in the kinds of risky situations he’d been warned about in his high school health class.

Bob Adelman / Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline

This Independence Day, Connecticut residents will flock to the shoreline, raising umbrellas and spreading towels along the state's beaches.

Yet, behind this sunny imagery hides a somber history -- a story of coastal ownership and exclusivity.

This hour, University of Virginia professor and Free the Beaches author Andrew Kahrl joins us. We reflect on the impact of Connecticut’s private and restricted beaches and learn about a 20th-century crusade to unlock the state’s coast. 

In the first lawsuit of its kind, the NAACP and Yale Law School are suing the State of Connecticut for the use of prison gerrymandering.

Mrs. Charles Stephenson (Grace Murray) / Wikimedia Commons

Next Tuesday is “Juneteenth”, a holiday that marks the day that slavery finally ended in Texas--two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. This hour, we learn more about Juneteenth and how the holiday came to be commemorated nationwide. The Amistad Center will explain why this day is still relevant today.

Many people think of American slavery as a Southern problem, but there were in fact enslaved people in Connecticut until 1848. We take a look at the history and legacy of slavery right here in Connecticut.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

A sign taped to the door told customers that Story and Soil Coffee was closing early for a staff training.

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