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Politics

Connecticut Has A Surplus - For Now

Aug 20, 2018
Office of Policy and Management Secretary Ben Barnes
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

State government’s new budget year is off to a healthy start, but there’s good news and bad news in the numbers.

In a series of tweets over the weekend, President Trump responded to a story published in The New York Times that detailed extensive cooperation between White House counsel Donald McGahn and the inquiry by special counsel Robert Mueller into obstruction of justice and possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Zack and Gillian Petrarca aren’t old enough to vote. But the teenage siblings say they are Team Hayes all the way.

Updated at 5:07 p.m. ET

The top Democrat on the House Oversight Committee is demanding an explanation of President Trump's decision this week to revoke the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan

In a letter to White House chief of staff John Kelly, Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., asked for a detailed briefing on the decision and suggested Trump may have failed to follow proper procedures.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

It didn’t take long for the gloves to come off in the race to be Connecticut’s next governor.

David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

Two self-funding millionaires Tuesday secured their spots at the top of the ballot in the November 6 election.

Ned Lamont, now the undisputed Democratic Party nominee for governor, trounced Joe Ganim in a race that was called by The Associated Press just 30 minutes after primary polls closed at 8 p.m.

Updated at 12:30 a.m. ET

Vermont voters made history on Tuesday as Christine Hallquist, a transgender woman, won the Democratic primary for governor.

Hallquist, who will now face Vermont Republican Gov. Phil Scott in the general election, becomes the first openly transgender person to ever win a major party's nomination for governor in U.S. history. If she wins in November, she'd be the nation's first transgender governor.

GOP Voters Choose Corey To Challenge Murphy

Aug 15, 2018
Matthew Corey accepting the GOP endorsement for U.S. Senate.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Matthew Corey has defeated fellow Republican Dominic Rapini for the chance to run against Connecticut’s most heavily financed and formidable political opponent — Democratic U.S. Senator Chris Murphy.

Ryohei Noda / Creative Commons

Hannah Arendt's 576-page magnum opus, The Origins of Totalitarianism, is a densely-written book about the rise of anti-Semitism up to the outbreak of World War I. The book sold out on Amazon within one month of the 2016 election in which America elected Donald Trump as their next president. 

Lamont, Stefanowski Win Party Nominations For Governor; Hayes Upsets In 5th District

Aug 14, 2018
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Updated at 11:30pm

Political rookie Jahana Hayes has pulled off an upset in the Democratic primary in the 5th Congressional District. Her opponent Mary Glassman conceded the race, congratulating Hayes as a "tough competitor" who ran a good race. Hayes is a former National Teacher of the Year. She will face former Meriden mayor Manny Santos in November.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's Primary Day in Connecticut! We know a lot of people can't vote in today's primaries because they're either not registered with one of our two major political parties, they're one of the millions of Americans on vacation during one of our final weeks of summer, or they just don't know about it. Maybe, it's all of the above.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

After months of candidate debates, interviews, and campaign ads, it’s time for Connecticut residents to cast their ballots in the state's primary elections.

This hour, we take a look at what we can -- and cannot -- expect at the polls this Primary Day. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill expects voter turnout in Tuesday’s statewide primary elections to be greater than the 20-to-25 percent of the party-affiliated voters that usually come out for the August primaries.

Matthew Straubmuller / Creative Commons

 

Many of us hoped the white nationalist movement that instigated last year's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, would suffer a fatal blow. The majority of Americans condemned both the blatant bigotry displayed by the protesters and the president's failure to single out the nationalists as the perpetrators of the "hatred, bigotry and violence." He instead, said he saw that violence "on many sides."

That's not what happened.

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